Developing LGBTQ programs for perpetrators and victims/survivors of domestic and family violence

Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety, 2020

Developed under the guidance of a project reference group comprised of key academics, clinicians and researchers in the areas of LGBTQ theory and practice, domestic and family violence interventions and social work practice, this research highlights the need to support the LGBTQ community in developing readiness to recognise domestic and family violence, and then seek support.

Identifying and responding to LGBTQ DFV/IPV can present specific challenges.

Key findings:
  • DFV/IPV in LGBTQ relationships can be difficult to identify and understand due to the “heterosexual face” of domestic violence.
  • DFV/IPV in LGBTQ relationships can involve unique tactics of abuse, including identity-based abuse.
  • Trauma from discrimination and stigma (minority stress) impact experiences of DFV/IPV for LGBTQ community members, but are not directly causal.
  • LGBTQ community readiness to recognise DFV/IPV and seek support, as well as service responses to LGBTQ people experiencing DFV/IPV, must be strengthened.

 

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IDAHOBIT 2020: South Australian community event (free)

South Australian Rainbow Advocacy Alliance and South Australian Department of Human Services, April 2020

17 May is IDAHOBIT – the International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia, Intersexphobia and Transphobia. IDAHOBIT’s theme for 2020 is “Breaking the Silence”, and that’s precisely what we’re going to do!

Although we might not be able to meet together in person to recognise this important date due to COVID-19, the South Australian Department of Human Services and the South Australian Rainbow Advocacy Alliance have joined together to host a special online event for the South Australian LGBTIQ+ community via Zoom.

Join us on Sunday 17 May for a Q&A session featuring LGBTIQ+ people from several diverse backgrounds as we discuss what “Breaking the Silence” means for our rainbow communities.

The Q&A session will feature:

  • Zac Cannell, TransMasc SA & transgender community leader
  • Sarah K Reece, LGBTIQ+ disability advocate
  • Neha MadhokDemocracy in Colour

We are also delighted to welcome Michelle Lensink MLC, Minister for Human Services, to speak with us at the event, as well as Jason Tuazon-McCheyne (founder of The Equality Project) to tell us about the Better Together LGBTIQ+ conference that is coming to Adelaide in 2021.

SARAA acknowledges the Kaurna people as the traditional custodians of the Adelaide Plains. We also acknowledge other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their continued connection to their lands throughout Australia.

FAQs

How can I submit a question for the Q&A session?

Questions can be submitted via Zoom during the event, or you can submit a question in advance by emailing chairsaraa@gmail.com

How do I join the webinar?

After registering on Eventbrite, you will receive an email with instructions on how to join the Zoom webinar. Simply follow the link provided and you’ll be able to join on 17 May.

Do I need to be part of the LGBTIQ+ community to attend?

Not at all! Allies are welcome to join us and learn more from our amazing speakers!

Providing safe and remote services to LGBTIQ people due to the impact of COVID-19

Rainbow Health Victoria, April 2020

We would like to acknowledge the difficult time we all face with the current public health crisis caused by coronavirus (COVID-19). Overall, older people and those with underlying health conditions are more at risk. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ) communities are known to have significant health disparities, which might influence disease outcomes. These include a greater risk for HIV, certain cancers, asthma, obesity and cardiovascular disease, and higher smoking rates.

Accessing available health and community support services is more important than ever for LGBTIQ communities. But barriers to accessing services – for example, expecting or experiencing discrimination – may be heightened at times of stress and upheaval. Rainbow Health Victoria has created this tip sheet to assist in providing safe and inclusive remote services to LGBTIQ people due to the impact of COVID-19.

Respect@Work: Sexual Harassment National Inquiry Report

Australian Human Rights Commission, March 2020

This Inquiry examined the nature and prevalence of sexual harassment in Australian workplaces, the drivers of this harassment and measures to address and prevent sexual harassment.

Since 2003, the Australian Human Rights Commission has conducted four periodic
surveys on the national experience of sexual harassment. The most recent survey showed that sexual harassment in Australian workplaces is widespread and pervasive.

One in three people experienced sexual harassment at work in the past five years.

Underpinning this aggregate figure is an equally shocking reflection of the
gendered and intersectional nature of workplace sexual harassment. As the 2018
National Survey revealed, almost two in five women (39%) and just over one in
four men (26%) have experienced sexual harassment in the workplace in the past
five years. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were more likely to have
experienced workplace sexual harassment than people who are non-Indigenous (53%
and 32% respectively).

Tough man stereotype can hurt women and men: report

Our Watch, November 2019

Men who conform only to rigid stereotypes of how to be a man are more likely to have sexist attitudes and behaviours, which in turn makes them more likely to perpetuate violence against women, according to a new report by Our Watch and the Victorian Office for Women.

The landmark study, Men in focus, is an extensive review of Australian and international research evidence on the topic, which aims to build a deeper understanding of masculinity, as well as providing guidance for those working with men and boys to prevent violence against women.

Cultural Safety workshops with Khadija Gbla (free event)

Morella Community Centre in collaboration with Khadija Gbla, October 2019

WHAT IS CULTURAL SAFETY?

Cultural safety is identified as “an environment that is safe for people: where there is no assault, challenge or denial of their identity, of who they are and what they need. It is about shared respect, shared meaning, shared knowledge and experience, of learning, living and working together with dignity and truly listening”.

Culturally safe practices include actions which recognize and respect the cultural identities of others and safely meet their needs, expectations and rights. Alternatively, culturally unsafe practices are those that “diminish, demean or disempower the cultural identity and well-being of an individual”.

Through these workshops, participants will develop an understanding of cultural safety and how to apply cultural safety principles into their work and personal life.

WORKSHOP TOPICS:
SESSION 1: Friday 8th November – Introduction to Cultural Safety
SESSION 2: Friday 22nd November – Cultural Safety, an Educational context*
*This session is aimed for anyone working in an education setting
SESSION 3: Friday 6th December – Cultural Safety for Service Providers

TIME: 10am -11:30am for all workshop topics.

LOCATION: MORELLA COMMUNITY CENTRE
90 Kings Road, Parafield Gardens SA 5107

COST: Free

FACILITATOR: Khadija Gbla is a very passionate and inspiring African-Australian woman. She is an award-winning human rights activist, leader and inspirational speaker.
Khadija Gbla was born in Sierra Leone, spent her youth in Gambia, and as a teenager put down roots in Australia. Khadija was just 3 years old when the war broke out in her country, Sierra Leone and 10 years later they attained refugee status and resettled in Adelaide.
Khadija continues to provide advocacy, training, speaking on domestic and family violence, child protection, racism, human rights, refugees and cultural diversity through her cultural consultancy. She is the co-founder of The Desert Flower Centre and foundation Australia. The Desert Flower Australia is the first centre in Australia and the Asia pacific region that specialises in providing medical care and reconstructive surgery for women impacted by female genital mutilation. Khadija is a TEDX speaker with close to 2 million views on her talk, “My mother’s strange definition of empowerment”. She has represented Australia in the international arena at the Harvard National Model United Nations, Commonwealth Youth Forum and Australian and African Dialogue, Commonwealth heads of states Women’s forum etc. she has displayed great courage and determination in achieving her aspiration of giving women, youth and minority groups a voice at local, state and international level.