Phylogenetic clustering networks among heterosexual migrants with new HIV diagnoses post-migration in Australia

Phylogenetic clustering networks among heterosexual migrants with new HIV diagnoses post-migration in Australia

Rachel Sacks-Davis  et al

PLOS One

Published: September 1, 2020

https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0237469

Background:

It is estimated that approximately half of new HIV diagnoses among heterosexual migrants in Victoria, Australia, were acquired post-migration. We investigated the characteristics of phylogenetic clusters in notified cases of HIV among heterosexual migrants.

Conclusion:

Migrants appear to be at elevated risk of HIV acquisition, in part due to intimate relationships between migrants from the same country of origin, and in part due to risks associated with the broader Australian HIV epidemic. However, there was no evidence of large transmission clusters driven by heterosexual transmission between migrants. A multipronged approach to prevention of HIV among migrants is warranted.

 

Changing Epidemiology of Gonorrhea in Adelaide, South Australia

Ellis SL, Tsourtos G, Waddell R, Woodman R, Miller ER.

Changing Epidemiology of Gonorrhea in Adelaide, South Australia.

Sex Transm Dis. 2020 Jun;47(6):402-408. doi: 10.1097/OLQ.0000000000001162.

Abstract

Background: Gonorrhea is a significant public health concern. The changing epidemiology of gonorrhea in Australia has highlighted the need for detailed examination of surveillance data to determine population groups at greatest risk for infection.

Methods: We analyzed deidentified gonorrhea notification data for the years 2012 to 2017, in Adelaide (N = 3680), calculating age-adjusted notification and antibiotic resistance rates. Age, gender, year, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status were assessed for associations with gonorrhea notifications using negative binomial, log binomial and spatial autoregressive models. Maps were generated to examine spatial localization of gonorrhea rates in Adelaide.

Results: Gonorrhea notification rates in Adelaide increased annually, with a 153% adjusted increase in rates from 2012 to 2017, localized to specific areas and inversely associated with income levels. The increase in rates in 2016 and 2017 was associated with young heterosexuals from low income areas. Azithromycin-resistant notifications increased significantly in 2016 in young heterosexuals. Reinfections were significantly more likely in men who have sex with men than other population groups.

Conclusions: This study demonstrates the changing epidemiology of gonorrhea in Adelaide from a largely men who have sex with men profile toward an increase in young heterosexual gonorrhea. This could be seen as a harbinger for future increases in heterosexually transmitted HIV and other sexually transmitted infections in Australia.

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RACGP offers new suite of IUD resources

RACGP, 25th August 2020

The newly released suite consists of five intrauterine device (IUD) resources, including a checklist and patient confirmation form, patient pre- and post-insertion checklist, practitioner checklist and disclaimer. Current evidence-based options for pain relief during IUD procedures are provided as an appendix.

Dr Amy Moten, Chair of the RACGP Specific Interests Sexual Health Medicine network, led development of the resources, which she says are designed to provide guidance and support to all Australian practitioners.

SAMESH cooking class presents: Classic Egg and Bacon Pie

SAMESH, 18/09/2020

SAMESH have still not been able tor resume their face to face cooking classes for PLHIV & older LGBTIQ+ community members, so Paul is continuing to develop recipes for you to try at home.

This week he brings us is a classic easy pie that “tastes great, is quick to make, can be eaten hot or cold, and uses a few simple fillings”.

“If you love bacon & eggs you will love this pie”, says Paul.

This recipe will make 1 large or 4 individual pies.

Gay Asian Proud free online event this Friday 18th September

Thorne Harbour Health, 16th September 2020

Gay Asian Proud (GAP) is excited to organise an online chat, Questioning Stereotypes And Assumptions, this Friday, 18 September, 6.00 PM – 8.00 PM pm AEST (5.30 PM  – 7.30 PM SA time). 

We welcome all GAP members, and Asian same-sex attracted men (cis and transgender).

If you are not a GAP member yet, please email gap@thorneharbour.org to be placed on our mailing list. We will invite you to upcoming events.

We want to hear your experience with stereotypes about Asian gay and bisexual men, the assumptions we make based on our cultural upbringing, our inherent bias, and how we could address them in a respectful way that facilitates intercultural understanding. This is your platform. We want to hear you talk.

Facilitated by James & Amirul, Coordinators of Gay Asian Proud (GAP), a social support group for Asian gay & bisexual men (cis and transgender).

Sign up now at Eventbrite to claim your FREE ticket! We can’t wait to see you this Friday! 

 

Disparities in characteristics in accessing public Australian sexual health services between Medicare‐eligible and Medicare‐ineligible MSM

Disparities in characteristics in accessing public Australian sexual health services between Medicare‐eligible and Medicare‐ineligible men who have sex with men

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health

Anysha M. Walia, Christopher K. Fairley, Catriona S. Bradshaw, Marcus Y. Chen, Eric P.F. Chow

First published: 31 August 2020
https://doi.org/10.1111/1753-6405.13029
Abstract:

Objectives: Accessible health services are a key element of effective human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sexually transmitted infection (STI) control. This study aimed to examine whether there were any differences in accessing sexual health services between Medicare‐eligible and Medicare‐ineligible men who have sex with men (MSM) in Melbourne, Australia.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective, cross‐sectional study of MSM attending Melbourne Sexual Health Centre between 2016 and 2019. Demographic characteristics, sexual practices, HIV testing practices and STI diagnoses were compared between Medicare‐eligible and Medicare‐ineligible MSM.

Results: We included 5,085 Medicare‐eligible and 2,786 Medicare‐ineligible MSM. Condomless anal sex in the past 12 months was more common in Medicare‐eligible compared to Medicare‐ineligible MSM (74.4% vs. 64.9%; p<0.001) although the number of partners did not differ between groups. There was no difference in prior HIV testing practices between Medicare‐eligible and Medicare‐ineligible MSM (76.1% vs. 77.7%; p=0.122). Medicare‐ineligible MSM were more likely to have anorectal chlamydia compared to Medicare‐eligible MSM (10.6% vs. 8.5%; p=0.004).

Conclusions: Medicare‐ineligible MSM have less condomless sex but a higher rate of anorectal chlamydia, suggesting they might have limited access to STI testing or may be less willing to disclose high‐risk behaviour.

Implications for public health: Scaling up access to HIV and STI testings for Medicare‐ineligible MSM is essential.