More than half of Aussie men report experiencing sexual difficulties

The Conversation, March 22, 2019

One in two Australian men aged 18 to 55 have experienced sexual difficulty in the past 12 months, according to data released this week.

The findings are drawn from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health, which included more than 12,000 men. Overall, 54% of sexually active men reported having at least one specific sexual problem lasting three months or more.

The men reported a range of difficulties.

What to know about bipolar disorder and sex

Medical News Today, 

Bipolar disorder causes a person to experience intense shifts in moods, sometimes from a manic state to a depressed state, for example. These shifts can occur with changes in sexual desire, confidence, or sexual function.

Though the symptoms vary from person to person, bipolar disorder can disrupt several aspects of a person’s life, including their sexuality.

In this article, we discuss sexual symptoms of bipolar disorder and ways to manage them.

New report about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women’s experience of violence

Australian Bureau of Statistics, 19 February 2019

The extent of family and domestic violence experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women has been revealed in a new Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) report using previously unpublished data from the 2014-15 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey. 

ABS Director of the Centre of Excellence for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Statistics, Debbie Goodwin said “Of those women who had experienced violence, more than two-thirds (72 per cent) identified an intimate partner or family member as a perpetrator in their most recent experience. This was twice the rate reported by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men (35 per cent).

More Support for Young People with Complex Mental Health Needs

Adelaide phn, February 7 2019

Adelaide PHN and Sonder have opened the doors to emerge – a new, free service in Adelaide’s outer northern and outer southern metropolitan regions, specifically created to help people from 16-25 years old who are experiencing or at risk of experiencing severe and complex mental illness.

The program aims to help young people who might otherwise “fall through the cracks”.

Commissioned and funded by Adelaide PHN as part of a suite of mental health services across the metropolitan region, emerge has a specific focus on young people dealing with anxiety, depression, eating disorders, bipolar disorder, psychosis, trauma and borderline personality disorder, where these conditions are having a significant impact on their lives.

Emerge will provide these young people with access to client and family-centred treatment that is specialised, clinical and evidence-based.

Within the new program, the young person, their family, clinicians, peer workers, care coordinators etc. will work as a team towards the goal of wellness and recovery.

Emerge will operate from Sonder-run headspace centres – Edinburgh North and Onkaparinga – with services commencing on 11 February 2019.

Referrals can be received from GPs and other primary health care providers. Alternatively, young people can self-refer or be referred through a school or community worker. Families, carers or friends can also refer on behalf of the young person, however these referrals must take place with the person’s consent.

Adelaide PHN has also provided funding for additional youth mental health services at headspace Adelaide and Port Adelaide, and will announce further mental health services for Aboriginal youth in the coming months.

For further information about emerge, please contact Sonder on (08) 8209 0700 or visit the website www.sonder.net.au.

For more information about Adelaide PHN visit  adelaidephn.com.au.

Policy Consultation Forum: LGBTIQ and youth community feedback sought

SHINE SA, August 2018

LGBTIQ and youth community feedback is sought on SA Health Equity and Access in Health Care Policy Directive & Southern Adelaide Local Health Network (SALHN) Adult Community Mental Health Model of Care. 

Members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ) communities and young people (under 30) are invited to an information session to learn about the draft Equity and Access in Health Care Policy Directive for SA Health as well as the draft SALHN Adult Community Mental Health Model of Care. SA Health and SALHN, in partnership with SHINE SA, are facilitating an information and feedback session about these important documents. We look forward to hearing your views on the policy and model of care.

The SA Health Policy aims to provide a comprehensive overarching framework which consolidates equity and access requirements for South Australia’s diverse health consumers consistent with the South Australian Government Universal Access and Inclusion Guidelines (the Guidelines). The Policy is intended to provide strategic direction to SA Health employees, or persons who provide health care services on behalf of SA Health, to ensure that access to public health services is equitable for all South Australian health consumers.

The central purpose of the SALHN Adult Community Mental Health Model of Care is to provide high level guidance pertaining to the provision of safe and high quality care to Southern Adelaide Local Health Networks diverse mental health consumers. The core principles speak to the provision of person centred, evidence based recovery oriented care that is provided by an appropriately diverse multi-disciplinary team. Strong emphasis has been placed upon care delivery within the context of a culturally and linguistically safe service that engenders strong collaborative partnerships across agencies and between consumers, carers and health professionals. A Service Plan is being developed to operationalise the Model of Care, and both elements will be implemented in parallel once development is complete.

Tuesday, August 28 at 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM

At SHINE SA, 57 Hyde Street, Adelaide 5000

Free event

Light refreshments will be provided

Image may contain: 2 people, people smiling, hat and textmodel of care

Using Chosen Names Reduces Odds of Depression and Suicide in Transgender Youths

The University of Texas at Austin, Tue, April 3, 2018

In one of the largest and most diverse studies of transgender youths to date, researchers led by a team at The University of Texas at Austin have found that when transgender youths are allowed to use their chosen name in places such as work, school and at home, their risk of depression and suicide drops.     

“Many kids who are transgender have chosen a name that is different than the one that they were given at birth,” said author Stephen T. Russell, professor and chair of human development and family science. “We showed that the more contexts or settings where they were able to use their preferred name, the stronger their mental health was.”