Forum: Engaging Marginalised Populations in Hepatitis C Treatment

Hepatitis SA, January 2018

Hepatitis SA invites you to The 2018 HepLINK Forum:
Engaging Marginalised Populations in Hepatitis C Treatment

Thjis will be held on Thursday, 1 March, 11am–2pm (lunch provided), at the Education Development Centre (EDC), 4 Milner St, Hindmarsh.

  • Keynote speaker:
    Dr Phillip Read, Director, Kirketon Road Centre
    Dr Phillip Read is a sexual health physician and the Director of the Kirketon Road Centre in Sydney’s Kings Cross. Kirketon Road is a primary health care facility involved in the prevention, treatment and care of HIV, hepatitis and STIs among people who inject drugs, sex workers and at-risk young people.
    PLUS
  •  Rosalie Altus, Practice Consultant Viral Hepatitis Liaison Nurse, Flinders Medical Centre
  • Panel discussion with guest speakers representing the Aboriginal, youth, regional, multicultural and CNP sectors across South Australia

Please RSVP to admin@hepatitissa.asn.au by Friday 23 February, 2018.

For further information about the event, please phone Tess on 8362 8443.

The stigma of sex work comes with a high cost

The Conversation, August 10, 2017

Stigma is a mark of disgrace, a social discrediting, or a spoiled identity. For sex workers, legal, cultural and social discourse is characterised by “prurience, titillation, outrage and disgust”.

Narratives of sex work as undesirable and sex workers as disposable victims are heavily steeped in our cultural imagination.

Examining the individual and institutional treatment of sex workers reveals how sexuality is organised and stratified, and how certain kinds of intimacies are rewarded or punished.

What is Sexual and Reproductive Justice?

NYCHealth, Nov 2017, Updated Feb 2017

Sexual and reproductive justice (SRJ) exists when all people have the power and resources to make healthy decisions about their bodies, sexuality and reproduction.

SRJ means that every person has the human right to:

  • Choose to have or not have children
  • Choose the conditions under which to give birth or create a family
  • Care for their children with the necessary social support in a safe and healthy environment
  • Control their own body and self-expression, free from any form of sexual or reproductive oppression

The term “reproductive justice” was coined by a group of black women in 1994. From this group, a framework and Sister Song, a collective led by indigenous women and women of colour, emerged.

NYCHealth has made a video explaining this.

OMID magazine for Afghan and Farsi speaking LGBT people

PEACE Multicultural Services, RASA, 2016

OMID is a new magazine for our Afghan and Farsi speaking friends around the world, who are same-sex attracted, trans-gendered or who are questioning their sexuality and/or gender. Whether you live in Australia, Afghanistan, Iran or anywhere else in the world, we hope that this magazine reaches you, provides you with valuable information and touches your heart. OMID (meaning hope), like a beacon of light at the end of a dark tunnel, is what keeps us going even in the toughest of times.”

OMID has a strong focus on health and well-being and is filled with stories, poems, personal experiences, film reviews and artworks. If you have a client, a friend or a family member that would like to contribute to the magazine in future or would like to know more about what PEACE Multicultural Services of Relationships Australia SA do and the support they offer, please email them on omid@rasa.org.au . The current issue is of OMID is November 2016.

  • Read, download or subscribe to issues of OMID here 

Landmark indigenous suicide report paves way for LGBTI recognition

Star Observer, Oct 14, 2016

A FEDERAL report which has revealed the shocking rate of suicide in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations has also been hailed as revolutionary for LGBTI people by Indigenous advocates.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Evaluation Project (ATSISPEP) was released today as a way to address the suicide crisis in Indigenous communities as Federal Health Minister Sussan Ley, Indigenous affairs Minister Nigel Scullion and Ken Wyatt plan to attend a roundtable with Indigenous leaders and community organisations to address the issue.

 

Relationships & Sexual Health Program for workers in CALD/multicultural services

SHine, July 2016

Do you work with culturally and linguistically diverse / multicultural communities?

Do you want to be confident speaking about sexual health with your clients?

Do you want to understand how sexual health affects the overall health of your clients?

If so, then the Relationships & Sexual Health Program is for you.

This course provides you with opportunities to explore your attitudes towards sexual health and relationships education. You will gain the skills to be better placed to support your clients to make sense of their sexual health. This is a great opportunity for professional development and networking. It is important that workers promote and support the sexual and reproductive health of their clients as well as reducing the barriers to improved sexual and reproductive health.

Who would benefit from this course? Youth workers; sexual health workers; CALD health workers; reproductive and sexual health service providers; domestic violence workers; settlement workers; allied health workers; anyone who works with CALD communities.

A further optional day includes assessment which allows you to apply for a sexual health focused competency that may contribute towards a Certificate or Diploma in Community Services.

WHEN: 5, 12 & 19 September 2016
WHERE: SHine SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville
TIME: 9am – 5pm
COST: $399 (Student Concession: $199 / Early Bird Concession: 10% off if registered 2 months ahead)

TOPICS INCLUDE:
Sexuality & Sexual Health/Culture
Sex & the Law
Cultural Sexual Violence
Sexual Diversity
Anatomy & Physiology
Contraception
Sexually Transmitted Infections
Contradictions of Pleasure & Culture
Client Stories
Attitudes to Sex & Sexuality
Female Genital Mutilation
Resources