More needs to be done for LGBTIQ+ inclusion across Australia, ANZ research shows

ANZ, February 20, 2019

New ANZ research1 shows that almost half a million LGBTIQ+ community members (1 in every 4) in Australia are still not comfortable being their true selves and discussing their sexuality and gender identity with their loved ones or friends.

ANZ commissioned the research to mark its 13 year relationship with the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras.

ANZ’s Group Executive Australia, Mark Hand, who is also Chair of ANZ’s Diversity Council, said: “Being open about your whole identity is something that all Australians should be comfortable doing, and yet our research shows that this is not the case.”

Key research findings:

  • 84% of LGBTIQ+ community members believe there are still parts of Australia where it is unsafe to be LGBTIQ+. And 68% of non- LGBTIQ+ think so too.
  • 68% of Aussies support efforts to improve LGBTIQ+ equality.
  • LGBTIQ+ community members are still twice as likely to experience some form of harassment, discrimination or open prejudice because of their sexual orientation.
  • 52% of LGBTIQ+ community members would not open up about their sexuality with their manager at work.

 

 

 

 

 

Out at Work: from Prejudice to Pride report

RMIT University, 16 Aug 2018

Less than a third of LGBTIQ+ employees in Australia are out to all their colleagues and this significantly compromises their wellbeing and work performance, new research has found.

According to the Out at Work: from Prejudice to Pride report released today, roughly 25 per cent of employees were out to some people and almost 40 per cent were out to most people at work.

The report was based on an online survey of more than 1,600 LGBTIQ+ workers about their experiences, as well as face-to-face think tanks with more than 60 LGBTIQ+ employees working at various levels across a range of organisations and industries.

The joint RMIT and Diversity Council Australia (DCA) report highlighted the complexities related to coming out at work – from coming out multiple times a day, week or year; coming out to some colleagues but not others; and being outed against their will.

Workplace culture, genuine bold leadership and policies were identified as the keys to creating an environment where LGBTIQ+ staff felt safe to come out.

Startling Data Reveals Half of LGBTQ Employees in the U.S. Remain Closeted at Work

Human Rights Campaign, June 25, 2018

The HRC Foundation released the results of a survey of employees across the USA, revealing the persistent daily challenges that have led nearly half of LGBTQ people to remain closeted at their workplaces — a rate largely unchanged over the past decade. 

A Workplace Divided: Understanding the Climate for LGBTQ Workers NationwideHRC’s third national workplace study over the past decade, shines a light on the often-intangible, nuanced issues in the workplace that keep LGBTQ workers “separate,” leaving many feeling distracted, exhausted or depressed, and believing they have nowhere to turn for help.

The survey of both LGBTQ and non-LGBTQ workers reveals that, despite significant progress in recent years — including the Supreme Court of the United State’s decision embracing marriage equality in 2015, as well as corporate policies and practices that increasing embrace LGBTQ inclusion, substantial barriers to full inclusion. Many of these barriers exist within interpersonal workplace connections, including non-work conversations or outings among coworkers.

  • The full report, A Workplace Divided: Understanding the Climate for LGBTQ Workers Nationwide, can be found here.

Release of the results of the 2015 -16 Rainbow Survey

Department for Communities and Social Inclusion  (SA)August 25, 2017

Today Department for Communities and Social Inclusion has released the results of the 2015-16 Rainbow Survey. The Rainbow Survey is the South Australian government’s general survey of the lives, opinions and experiences of LGBTIQ South Australians. The 2015-16 survey is the second Rainbow Survey, providing further insight and updated information on our LGBTIQ communities and the issues that are important to them. The survey recorded responses to 50 questions that examined demographics, health/wellbeing and transgender health, experiences of discrimination and abuse, police services and accessing services.

Results fill crucial gaps in public knowledge about LGBTIQ communities created by their ‘invisibility’ in the ABS Census and bring the lives of LGBTIQ people to greater prominence.

Key findings include:

  • South Australia’s LGBTIQ community is complex and diverse
  • most respondents are positive about their lives and health in general
  • transgender people experience dissatisfaction with health services
  • LGBTIQ people mask their identities in a range of public places to avoid discrimination
  • few respondents seek recourse to incidents of abuse
  • identifying perceived barriers to accessing services in the community

To download a copy of the survey follow this link.

Shh…No talking: LGBT-inclusive Sex and Relationships Education in the UK (report)

Terrence Higgins Trust, July 2016

‘SRE: Shh… No Talking’ report, published in July 2016, highlighted that sex and relationships education (SRE) is inadequate or absent in many schools in the UK. The report was published following a survey of over 900 young people aged 16-24 and it revealed that:

  • 99 per cent of young people surveyed thought SRE should be mandatory in all schools
  • 97 per cent thought it should be LGBT inclusive
  • one in seven respondents had not received any SRE at all
  • over half (61 per cent) received SRE just once a year or less
  • half of young people rated the SRE they received in school as either ‘poor’ or ‘terrible’
  • just 2 per cent rated it as ‘excellent’ and only 10 per cent rated it as ‘good’
  • 95 per cent were not taught about LGBT relationships

Meanwhile, several key topics were conspicuously absent from respondents’ experiences of SRE:

  • 75 per cent of young people were not taught about consent
  • 95 per cent had not learned about LGBT sex and relationships
  • 89 per cent were not taught about sex and pleasure
  • 97 per cent missed out on any discussion around gender identity
  • three out of five respondents either didn’t remember receiving information on HIV in school (32 per cent) or didn’t receive information on HIV in school (27 per cent)

In this report THT defines LGBT-inclusive SRE as SRE which covers essential topics of relevance to LGBT people as well as heterosexual people, so as to better inform them and to promote better social tolerance and understanding of difference. This includes, but is not exclusively limited to: LGBT relationships, sex and families, coming out, the promotion of good sexual health and issues of gender identity – including how to support someone who may be transitioning.

Download report (PDF, 52 pages) here

Stepping Out: free workshops at SAMESH (for young same-sex attracted men)

SAMESH, March 2016

SAMESH is running its first Stepping Out workshop for 2016.

Working in partnership with the team at MOSAIC services, this FREE workshop provides a space for same sex attracted men, 18 – 26 to gather and talk about sexuality, sex and sexual health.

Workshops will run once a week for 6 weeks, commencing April 26. (Numbers limited to 12 participants).

Workshops will run between 6.00pm – 9.00pm, and provide an opportunity to discuss a variety of topics in a safe environment, including:

  • Self Esteem & Stereotypes
  • Lifestyle & Community
  • Relationships
  • HIV & STIs
  • Coming Out
  • Sex & Pleasure

Free dinner is provided for all participants.

Should you have any questions at all regarding these resources or the workshops, feel free to contact Matt Davies on 7099 5311 or Emma Williams on 0421 103 319.

You can also find more information at the SAMESH website www.samesh.org.au where individuals can also register their interest.

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