The Evidence for U=U: Why Negligible Risk Is Zero Risk

August 10, 2017

Over the last year, hundreds of HIV organisations have joined a new campaign to endorse the statement that HIV transmission does not occur when viral load is undetectable on ART.

And while the dramatic impact of ART on reducing HIV transmission has been known for a long time, it is new to say ART stops transmission completely.

Syphilis Outbreak in Northern South Australia

SA Health, Communicable Disease Control Branch (CDCB),15/5/17

The Communicable Disease Control Branch (CDCB) has been closely monitoring infectious syphilis notifications in South Australia in light of a multi-jurisdictional outbreak of syphilis occurring across northern Australia. It appears that this outbreak has spread to South Australia, with sustained transmission occurring in Port Augusta, and there is the potential for spread to other regions of South Australia.

 

HIV prevention drug PrEP being tested on high-risk adolescents

Sydney Morning Herald, July 21 2016

A preventative HIV drug being used by thousands of gay men in Australia is being tested on teenagers at high risk of the virus.

Studies have shown that PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) offers near complete protection against HIV if taken properly every day. Researchers are now testing it on young people in South Africa and the US.

Read more here

Decision-making about infant feeding among African women living with HIV in the UK

“It pains me because as a woman you have to breastfeed your baby”: decision-making about infant feeding among African women living with HIV in the UK

Sex Transm Infect 2016;92:331-336 doi:10.1136/sextrans-2015-052224

Abstract

Objectives UK guidance advises HIV-positive women to abstain from breast feeding. Although this eliminates the risk of postnatal vertical transmission of HIV, the impact of replacement feeding on mothers is often overlooked. This qualitative study examines, for the first time in the UK, decision-making about infant feeding among African women living with HIV.

Methods Between 2010 and 2011, we conducted semistructured interviews with 23 HIV-positive African women who were pregnant or had recently given birth. We recruited participants from three HIV antenatal clinics in London.

Results Women highlighted the cultural importance of breast feeding in African communities and the social pressure to breast feed, also describing fears that replacement feeding would signify their HIV status. Participants had significant concerns about physical and psychological effects of replacement feeding on their child and felt their identity as good mothers was compromised by not breast feeding. However, almost all chose to refrain from breast feeding, driven by the desire to minimise vertical transmission risk. Participants’ resilience was strengthened by financial assistance with replacement feeding, examples of healthy formula-fed children and support from partners, family, peers and professionals.

Conclusions The decision to avoid breast feeding came at considerable emotional cost to participants. Professionals should be aware of the difficulties encountered by HIV-positive women in refraining from breast feeding, especially those from migrant African communities where breast feeding is culturally normative. Appropriate financial and emotional support increases women’s capacity to adhere to their infant-feeding decisions and may reduce the emotional impact.

Read article (open access) here

 

People with HIV can conceive naturally without infecting partner or child

The Conversation, 24 April 2015, 2.36pm AEST

A new pill could enable people living with HIV to conceive children through sex without risking the health of their HIV-negative partner.

HIV and pregnancy is not a topic we hear a lot about in Australia.

Read more here

Kenya court urges change to law criminalizing women who pass HIV to baby

Reuters, Tue Mar 31, 2015 8:45am EDT

Human rights groups have welcomed moves to change a Kenyan law passed to curb the spread of HIV/AIDS, which criminalizes pregnant women who pass HIV/AIDS to their babies, saying it discouraged people from finding out their status.

Read more here