New sexual health videos in English, Arabic, Karen and Punjab

Health Translations Directory (Victorian Government of Australia), February  2018
Health Translations Directory has now added some new audiovisual files in English, Arabic, Karen and Punjab, developed by Family Planning Victoria. These are part of a series of videos about periods, pregnancy and contraception, for newly arrived migrant and refugee women in Australia.

The videos provide general information.lease speak to a health professional for appropriate individual advice.

(Note: These links may not work in all browsers – Internet explorer/Edge recommended)

 

Temporary migration and family violence: an analysis of victimisation, support and vulnerability

Monash University / InTouch Multicultural Centre Against Family Violence, 2017

Family violence does not discriminate. However, it is known that for various subsets of the population, both the experience of family violence and the support and response options do vary, in some cases significantly. The Victorian Royal Commission into Family Violence (VRCFV) acknowledged the importance of recognising these points of differentiation among key groups.

This report presents the results of the first comprehensive study of a subset of the immigrant and refugee community: temporary migrants. This group is comprised of those who are in Australia on temporary visas, which include partner-related visas, as well as working, student, visitor and other temporary visas.

Temporary migration status matters in the context of family violence because, in addition to the acknowledged levers of financial, emotional, technological, physical and sexual abuse that occur across situations of family violence, uncertainty of migration status creates additional leverage for violence and control.

This report draws on detailed cases of 300 women who sought the support service of InTouch Multicultural Centre Against Family Violence over 2015–16. The findings lay the ground for a range of potential interventions and improved responses for this group of women, on the basis of significant data that details the specific impact of migration status on the experience of family violence and access to support.

In summary, this report urges recognition of the following:

  • Temporary migration status impacts women regardless of whether or not they are eligible to apply for the family violence provision
  • On the one hand, migration status is prioritised over and above the experience of family violence. The response and support made available is dependent on migration status first and foremost, rather than risk and need in relation to experiencing family violence. This is most evident in relation to the limits on access to financial and housing support for women with temporary migration status.
  • On the other, migration status is often not factored into assessment of risk. The failure to recognise, understand and assess risk pertaining to migration status results in limited recognition of violence, abuse and coercion in all their forms, and their impact.
  • As a nation we are only just coming to grips with the complexity of family violence, the interventions required to better understand and manage risk, what is required to prevent family violence and what we need to do to ensure a comprehensive, impactful and efficient response. It is critical that we respond to family violence first and foremost, in its various manifestations across Australia, and that we recognise and support all victims equally, regardless of migration status or any other point of difference.

Access full report (PDF): Temporary Migration and Family Violence: An analysis of victimisation, vulnerability and support 

Shame, secrecy and silence hobble migrant women’s sexual health, new research suggests

Sydney Morning Herald, August 5th 2017

Shame, secrecy, silence and fear were keeping many new migrant women in the dark about their own sexual and reproductive health, found a recent study published in the Archives of Sexual Behavior.

Cultural and religious beliefs were major barriers to many women accessing health services, warned the researchers who held focus groups with 169 single, married, divorced and widowed women who arrived in Australia or Canada from Sudan, South Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Afghanistan, Sri Lanka, India and Latin America within the past six years.

Managing Chronic Hepatitis B – Advice for GPs (SHINE SA video)

SHINE SA, July 2017

Today, July 28th, is World Hepatitis Day.

There are no ‘healthy carriers’ of hepatitis B!

SA Health & SHINE SA are promoting a 6-minute video providing advice for general practitioners in diagnosing, managing and contact tracing patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), to assist in preventing serious liver disease.

It is now known that people who were previously considered to have ‘unresolved hepatitis B virus carrier state’ in fact have CHB. CHB requires lifelong recall and monitoring for disease progression, even when asymptomatic. It is estimated that South Australia has 14,400 people with CHB, 6,600 (46%) who are undiagnosed.  Current clinical guidelines recommend that patients with CHB should be monitored at least annually by their GP for disease progression and suitability for anti-viral treatment.

This video provides clinical advice from the Royal Adelaide Hospital, Viral Hepatitis Centre Co-Directors Dr Edmund Tse (Head of Hepatology) and Dr David Shaw (Head of Infectious Diseases), Margery Milner (Viral Hepatitis CPC) and Dr Sam Elliott, a GP and Hepatitis B s100 Community Prescriber.

More Training Needed for Australian Doctors to Identify and Treat FGM Patients

AMA, 23 Mar 2017

Training for doctors in how to identify and treat patients who have undergone female genital mutilation (FGM) should be included in tertiary medical curricula, the AMA said today.

Releasing the AMA’s Position Statement on Female Genital Mutilation 2017, AMA President, Dr Michael Gannon, said that while FGM is only practised in about 30 countries, and is illegal in Australia, Australian women are affected by the practice.

 

Forum: How to effectively use interpreters

SHINE SA, 18 April 2017

Our upcoming ReFRESH Forum is on how to use interpreters effectively.

Interpreters play an important role in our multicultural society, especially in their contribution to appropriate delivery of health care services. An interpreter’s role is to act as a conduit, conveying information in an understandable format between parties who do not share a common language.

Interpreters are a valuable asset when working with clients from diverse backgrounds. Ensuring that we are communicating effectively with our clients depends on how
and when we use interpreters.

This forum aims to explore and enhance the ways in which workers and services can effectively use interpreters.

When 2 June 2017
Where SHINE SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville
Time 1.30 – 3.30 pm
Cost $50 (Student Concession $45), light refreshments included.