International consensus on testosterone treatment for women

Jean Hailes, 2 September 2019

The first Global Position Statement on the use of testosterone in the treatment of women, led by the International Menopause Society (IMS), was published in four leading international medical journals today.

The statement has been authored by a diverse team of leading experts based around the world and has been endorsed by internationally-esteemed medical societies.

It follows years of debate regarding testosterone therapy for women and, for the first time, provides agreement among experts and medical societies about how testosterone could be prescribed for women.

Access the statement: 

Clinical Education Forum: Menopause, mood and missing mojo

SHINE SA, 15/01/2019

SHINE SA is pleased to present the following Clinical Education Forum on the topic of ‘Menopause, mood and missing mojo’.

This forum is available free of charge, and will also be recorded for future access.

This forum will cover management of menopause and a discussion of perimenopausal mood disorder and sexual dysfunction.

PRESENTER: Dr Amy Moten, SHINE SA Coordinator: Medical Education.

COST: Free. Light meal will be provided.
DATES: 5 February 2019
TIME: 6pm registration, 6.30 – 8.30pm
LOCATION: SHINE SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville

CPD points are awarded on completion of this forum

Enrol now via this page https://www.shinesa.org.au/events/education-forums/

 

 

 

New free MOOC from Adelaide Uni: Sex and Human Reproduction

University of Adelaide, June 2018

AdelaideX’s Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) offer learners free to study university-level online courses on a variety of topics.  AdelaideX’s latest MOOC, Sex and Human Reproduction, will launch on Thursday 12 July and enrolments are now open. 

Led by Professor Mario Ricci (Adelaide Medical School), and made in collaboration with experts from the Robinson Research Institute, this five-week course will cover all things related to sex and reproduction – from puberty to menopause, to fertility and contraception. The course focuses on underlying human biology, common myths, and the latest medical advances.

What you’ll learn

  • Structure and function of the male and female reproductive systems
  • Regulation of reproductive processes and cycles
  • Common reproductive disorders
  • Methods of contraception and assisted reproduction
  • Real world application of cutting-edge research in reproductive medicine

This MOOC is free (with a $50 fee for a verified certificate if desired).

 

 

Do Estrogen Therapies Affect Sexual Function in Early Postmenopause?

JAMA Internal Medicine, 2017

Transdermal estrogen therapy delivered through the skin modestly improved sexual function in early postmenopausal women, according to an article published by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Declining estrogen levels around the menopausal transition are commonly associated with sexual dysfunction, which can be an important determinant of women’s health and quality of life.

In the new article, Hugh S. Taylor, M.D., of the Yale School of Medicine, and his coauthors report on an ancillary study of a clinical trial that examined changes in sexual function in recently postmenopausal women.

 

Sex drive: Understanding why low libido is a common problem in middle-aged women

While it’s hard to know exactly how many women experience low libido, it seems it might be more common than previously thought.

Almost 70 per cent of Australian women aged 40-65 years old reported a lack of sexual desire in a recent study published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

The authors noted this was “somewhat higher” than estimates from previous studies, which used different survey methods.

 

Results of the Jean Hailes Women’s Health Survey 2016

Jean Hailes for Women’s Health, August 2016

In 2016, Jean Hailes for Women’s Health conducted the second annual Women’s Health Survey to understand the health information needs and behaviours of women living in Australia.

The survey set out to explore the health information needs of women and also identify trends in health behaviours, body image, mental health and health screening behaviours.
The 2016 Jean Hailes Women’s Health Survey was a national survey of 3236 women and health professionals of differing ages, cultural backgrounds and from a range of metropolitan, regional, rural and remote locations across Australia.
A selection of the key findings are outlined below:
Health concerns and information needs
• Women reported five main health concerns. These health concerns included weight
management, female-specific cancers, mental and emotional health, menopause and chronic pain.
• Nearly half of all women reported that they wanted more information on healthy eating and nutrition. Women also reported they wanted more information on mental health, weight management and memory.
• Women residing in metropolitan locations reported different health information needs to
women in regional and rural Australia.
Health checks and screening
• On average women visited the doctor 3-5 times per year, with only a small number of women not visiting the doctor at all in the last 12 months.
• Most women felt confident to ask their doctor questions and discuss health issues that were of concern. Only a small group reported that they were not confident to ask questions.
• Health professionals reported family violence, followed by painful sex and sexual health problems as health topics that their female patients found difficult to discuss.
• Most women reported engaging in general health checks as well as pap screening, breast screening and bowel screening. However, many women reported that they were not engaging in sexual health screening for STIs.
Download report (PDF) here