Strategies for inclusion and equality – ‘norm-critical’ sex education in Sweden

Sex Education, 2019,  DOI: 10.1080/14681811.2019.1634042
Abstract:
This article examines the tactical (counter) politics of inclusive and ‘norm-critical’ approaches in Swedish sex education, focusing on the enactment of this critical agenda in sex education practices and how teachers interpret and negotiate the possibilities and pitfalls of this kind of work.
The analysis draws on participant observation in sex education practices and in-service teacher training, as well as interviews with educators.
Three recurrent strategies lie at the centre of the analysis: the sensitive use of language to achieve inclusion; the organisation and incorporation of ‘sensitive’ content to resist stigmatisation; and the use of different modalities to produce a specific knowledge order.
The analysis shows how these strategies are grounded in norm-critical ideals, which become partly inflicted with tensions and discomforts when acted out in practice. The  analysis further shows how an inclusive and norm-critical agenda runs the risk of becoming static, in the sense of providing students with the results of critique rather than engaging them in it.

Sexual minority women face barriers to health care

The Conversation, October 23, 2019 9.25pm AEDT

Stigma and discrimination are common experiences that people who identify as LGBT or sexual minority face when accessing health services. One report found that one in seven LGBT people in the UK avoided seeking healthcare for fear of discrimination from staff. As many as one in four also experienced negative remarks against LGBT people from healthcare staff.

 

Understanding the experiences of Culturally Diverse LGBTIQ+ Talent at Work

Diversity Council Australia, 2019

While many workplaces have developed LGBTIQ+ inclusion programs, they are not currently specifically addressing the cultural diversity of LGBTIQ+ people.

DCA, along with Pride in Diversity, is undertaking research to help better understand the experiences of Culturally Diverse LGBTIQ+ Talent at Work.

This project will help with understanding of the experiences of people of LGBTIQ+ people from culturally diverse backgrounds, and will assist in providing informed advice to workplaces about how to make inclusion initiatives work.

  • Are you or one of your colleagues an LGBTIQ+ person from a non-Anglo or a non-Main English speaking country cultural background?
  • Can you share your insights to help develop workplace guidance for Australian organisations wanting to better harness the skills and talents of LGBTIQ+ people from culturally diverse backgrounds?

What do I need to do?

He, she, or … ? Gender-neutral pronouns reduce biases – study

The Guardian, Tue 6 Aug 2019 

A new study has found that using a gender-neutral pronoun reduces mental biases that favour men, and boosts positive feelings towards women and LGBT people.

The finding marks an easy win, the researchers believe, and shows how a minor change in language can help chip away at long-standing gender inequities.

 

Disrupting gender norms in health systems: making the case for change

The Lancet, Gender Equality, Norms, and Health Steering Committee, Published May 30, 2019

Summary

Restrictive gender norms and gender inequalities are replicated and reinforced in health systems, contributing to gender inequalities in health.
In this Series paper, we explore how to address all three through recognition and then with disruptive solutions.
We used intersectional feminist theory to guide our systematic reviews, qualitative case studies based on lived experiences, and quantitative analyses based on cross-sectional and evaluation research.
We found that health systems reinforce patients’ traditional gender roles and neglect gender inequalities in health, health system models and clinic-based programmes are rarely gender responsive, and women have less authority as health workers than men and are often devalued and abused.
With regard to potential for disruption, we found that gender equality policies are associated with greater representation of female physicians, which in turn is associated with better health outcomes, but that gender parity is insufficient to achieve gender equality. We found that institutional support and respect of nurses improves quality of care, and that women’s empowerment collectives can increase health-care access and provider responsiveness.
We see promise from social movements in supporting women’s reproductive rights and policies. Our findings suggest we must view gender as a fundamental factor that predetermines and shapes health systems and outcomes. Without addressing the role of restrictive gender norms and gender inequalities within and outside health systems, we will not reach our collective ambitions of universal health coverage and the Sustainable Development Goals. We propose action to systematically identify and address restrictive gender norms and gender inequalities in health systems.

More needs to be done for LGBTIQ+ inclusion across Australia, ANZ research shows

ANZ, February 20, 2019

New ANZ research1 shows that almost half a million LGBTIQ+ community members (1 in every 4) in Australia are still not comfortable being their true selves and discussing their sexuality and gender identity with their loved ones or friends.

ANZ commissioned the research to mark its 13 year relationship with the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras.

ANZ’s Group Executive Australia, Mark Hand, who is also Chair of ANZ’s Diversity Council, said: “Being open about your whole identity is something that all Australians should be comfortable doing, and yet our research shows that this is not the case.”

Key research findings:

  • 84% of LGBTIQ+ community members believe there are still parts of Australia where it is unsafe to be LGBTIQ+. And 68% of non- LGBTIQ+ think so too.
  • 68% of Aussies support efforts to improve LGBTIQ+ equality.
  • LGBTIQ+ community members are still twice as likely to experience some form of harassment, discrimination or open prejudice because of their sexual orientation.
  • 52% of LGBTIQ+ community members would not open up about their sexuality with their manager at work.