HIV Futures 9: deadline extended, last chance to participate, closes 28th May

The Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, May 2019

HIV Futures is a survey about health, treatments, work, finances, sex and relationships of people living with HIV (PLHIV).

HIV Futures is run by the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and
Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, who are still seeking participants for HIV Futures 9.

If you are aged over 18 years and living with HIV, please fill in the online survey, it takes about 25 minutes.

HIV Futures is the largest and most influential Australian study of people living with HIV. It has been running for 21 years, and directly informs quality of life indicators in the National HIV strategy and is used for HIV community service planning and advocacy.

Schools Coordinator vacancy at SHINE SA

SHINE SA, November 2018

  • Immediate start
  • 37.5 hours per week
  • ASO5 position – permanent hourly rate of $37.57 – $40.59 ( $73,496 to $79,413 per annum)
  • Excellent Salary Sacrificing Scheme – (PBI status)
  • Based at our Woodville office

SHINE SA is the leading sexual health agency in South Australia. We are a not-for-profit, non-government organisation working in partnership with government, health, education and community to improve the sexual and reproductive health and relationship wellbeing of South Australians.

We have an exciting opportunity for a suitably qualified and enthusiastic person to join our Schools Education and Support Team based at our Woodville office but working with schools across South Australia.  In this role, you will be responsible for increasing the capacity of principals, teachers and school communities by delivering professional development to teachers in:

  • Teaching it Like it is: Relationships and Sexual Health Curriculum and Education Courses
  • The South Australian Department for Education’s Keeping Safe: Child Protection Curriculum

This role will require you to work as part of a team to:

  • Develop, implement and evaluate best practice approaches to relationships and sexual health issues in schools.
  • Work collaboratively with the Department for Education and other relevant agencies.
  • Plan, implement and evaluate professional education courses for teachers.
  • Develop and evaluate curricula and resources for students from primary, secondary and disability sectors.
  • Actively participate in SHINE SA’s Health Promotion strategies.

To be eligible for this position you must:

  • Have a tertiary qualification in Education and be registered or able to register with the Teachers’ Registration Board of South Australia.
  • Have a current, full driver’s license and be able to undertake intra-state travel

If you are interested in this role, you must submit a covering letter with your CV which must include the details of three (3) referees.

Click on the following link to download the job and person specification.

For further information about the position contact Heidi Drummond on 08 8300 5353 or email 

Applications should be submitted electronically through seek website or via form below.

Applications close at 5.00pm Wednesday 28th November 2018

This appointment will be subject to a satisfactory Child-Related Employment Screening.

SHINE SA is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes all applications including those from our communities of interest which include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, LGBTI people, people with disabilities including mental health, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, sex workers, people living with HIV, people living in regional, rural and remote SA.

Apply for this position here

 

Connecting country: busting myths about Indigenous Australians (podcast)

Diversity Council of Australia, 2 Oct 2018

This 20-minute episode doesn’t just feature a beautiful Welcome to Country, but also attempts to connect Country by exploring the cultural and professional gaps that exist for Indigenous Australians at work and asking: where do these issues come from? Why do they persist? And what can we do to finally close the gap?

Helping answer these questions is Linda Burney – the first Aboriginal woman to serve in the House of Representatives, and the first Aboriginal person to serve in the NSW Parliament – as well as Karen Mundine, CEO at Reconciliation Australia.

Researched and hosted by: Andrew Maxwell. Produced and written by: Andrea Maltman Rivera. Executive produced by: Lisa Annese. Contributions from: Catherine Petterson and Simone Empacher Earl. Special thanks to Audiocraft. Welcome to Country by Aunty Norma Ingram.peer

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander listeners are warned.  The following podcast may contain voices of deceased people.

Landmark report tells stories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders with disability

 

Preventing sexual violence against young women from African backgrounds

Prof. Donna Chung, Prof. Colleen Fisher, Dr. Carole Zufferey & Dr. Ravi K Thiara
Australian Institute of Criminology
Trends & issues in crime and criminal justice No. 540, June 2018

This study explored how young women from African refugee and migrant backgrounds understand and experience sexual coercion and violence.

Data was gathered from young women from African backgrounds and a wide range of agencies in two Australian states, Western Australia and South Australia, to better understand the extent of their awareness of and concern about sexual coercion and assault and document how agencies respond to these issues.

The paper concludes it is necessary to improve policy, practice, professional development and training to better respond to the sexual violence experienced by these young women, and raise awareness of the issue in their communities in a culturally sensitive way.

Startling Data Reveals Half of LGBTQ Employees in the U.S. Remain Closeted at Work

Human Rights Campaign, June 25, 2018

The HRC Foundation released the results of a survey of employees across the USA, revealing the persistent daily challenges that have led nearly half of LGBTQ people to remain closeted at their workplaces — a rate largely unchanged over the past decade. 

A Workplace Divided: Understanding the Climate for LGBTQ Workers NationwideHRC’s third national workplace study over the past decade, shines a light on the often-intangible, nuanced issues in the workplace that keep LGBTQ workers “separate,” leaving many feeling distracted, exhausted or depressed, and believing they have nowhere to turn for help.

The survey of both LGBTQ and non-LGBTQ workers reveals that, despite significant progress in recent years — including the Supreme Court of the United State’s decision embracing marriage equality in 2015, as well as corporate policies and practices that increasing embrace LGBTQ inclusion, substantial barriers to full inclusion. Many of these barriers exist within interpersonal workplace connections, including non-work conversations or outings among coworkers.

  • The full report, A Workplace Divided: Understanding the Climate for LGBTQ Workers Nationwide, can be found here.