The Experience of International Students Before and During COVID-19: Housing, work, study, and wellbeing

 University of Technology Sydney, Australian Research Council study (DP190101073),

International students’ experience of renting accommodation in Australia is a crucial but overlooked determinant of their wellbeing, which has been brought into stark relief by the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

This report is based on two surveys of international students in the private rental sector (PRS). The first survey was conducted in the second half of 2019, before the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the second survey in June and the first week of July 2020, during the pandemic.

The findings of the first survey show that a substantial proportion of international students were already in a precarious situation before the pandemic.

The second survey reveals the various impacts of the pandemic on international students in the private rental sector and the extent to which their circumstances have deteriorated.

The report also draws on data from the initial stage of the qualitative component of the study – semi-structured in-depth interviews with international students conducted between April and July 2020. Quotes from some of the 26 semi-structured interviews conducted thus far, are presented alongside the survey data evidence that follows.

Although the focus is on the experiences of private renting, the report has taken a broader sociological approach to student housing problems and, as such, it offers wider insights into the wellbeing, employment, and income situations of international students at a crucial turning point for the Australian higher education sector

Job vacancy at SHINE SA: Mental Health Clinician / Team Leader, Gender Wellbeing Service

SHINE SA, August 2020

Mental Health Clinician and Team Leader – Gender Wellbeing Service

  • PO3 Level (hourly rate of $44.29 – $46.97 based on experience), Part-time (0.5 FTE)
  • Fixed-term contract to 30 June 2021 with possibility of extension
  • Excellent Salary Sacrificing Scheme

SHINE SA is a leading not-for-profit provider of primary care services and education for sexual and relationship wellbeing. We work in partnership with government, health, education and community agencies, and communities to improve the sexual and reproductive health and relationship well-being of the community. We have an opportunity for a Mental Health Clinician (see Job and Person Specification for the appropriate qualifications) to lead the Gender Wellbeing Service, based in the CBD at our Hyde Street site.

In this role you will provide psychological therapies for gender questioning, trans and gender diverse people in the metropolitan area of Adelaide with mild to moderate mental health concerns.  You will work closely with the Intake and Peer Support Coordinator and Administrative Support worker in the team and have responsibility for overseeing a lived-experience peer support program for volunteers.

This is will be a challenging and rewarding role for the right person, offering a competitive salary and the ability to salary package under the generous conditions available only to not-for-profit organisations.

If you are interested in this role, you are required to address the essential minimum requirements as outlined in the Job and Person Specification available on our SHINE SA web site at the link below.

  • Find out more or apply here: 

Mental Health Clinician and Team Leader – Gender Wellbeing Service

COVID-19 Impact and Response for Sex Workers

Scarlet Alliance, 2020

STATEMENT OF IMPACT

Sex workers throughout Australia have been devastatingly hit by the impact of coronavirus. As a workforce, sex workers are predominantly a mixture of precarious workers and the self-employed, being independent contractors who work in or for sex industry businesses, or sole traders who work independently for themselves. As such sex workers are particularly marginalised in terms of the impact of the coronavirus and many will still be excluded from the stimulus packages announced by the government.

While we welcome the announcement that from 27 April 2020 sole traders are included in the government’s Economic Response to the coronavirus, many sex workers will still be left without financial support.

Read more here

There are fears coronavirus is stopping Australia’s migrant women from accessing abortions

SBS News, 26th April 2020

Vulnerable pregnant women could lose access to abortion throughout Australia because of increased financial hardship caused by the coronavirus pandemic, reproductive health providers have warned. 

A combination of widespread job losses, differing abortion laws around the country, and patchy access to Medicare, could mean more women need financial assistance to terminate unwanted pregnancies or will face carrying their pregnancies to term.

Some providers even fear a return to people attempting unsafe abortions if women cannot afford legal terminations.

Resources Project Officer: job vacancy at NAPWHA

The National Association of People With HIV Australia (NAPWHA), March 2020

NAPWHA is seeking a Resources Project Officer to join their team in Newtown, Sydney and deliver two education projects in 2020.

The ideal applicant will have experience developing online learning resources, ideally in the community health sector and for people living with HIV. They will have experience in project management, working with and managing committees, and delivering projects on budget within a clear deadline. They will also be well-versed in the principles of adult education.

If you have high level resource development skills and enjoy working autonomously and collaboratively within a small team, this may be the job for you. People living with HIV are particularly encouraged to apply.

This four-day a week position is for a 12-month fixed-term contract and carries a total salary package of 60-70K pro rata. Salary packaging is also available.

  • Read more about applying for this job, which closes at 4.00pm on Thursday 9 April 2020, at the PDF here: Resources job ad

Respect@Work: Sexual Harassment National Inquiry Report

Australian Human Rights Commission, March 2020

This Inquiry examined the nature and prevalence of sexual harassment in Australian workplaces, the drivers of this harassment and measures to address and prevent sexual harassment.

Since 2003, the Australian Human Rights Commission has conducted four periodic
surveys on the national experience of sexual harassment. The most recent survey showed that sexual harassment in Australian workplaces is widespread and pervasive.

One in three people experienced sexual harassment at work in the past five years.

Underpinning this aggregate figure is an equally shocking reflection of the
gendered and intersectional nature of workplace sexual harassment. As the 2018
National Survey revealed, almost two in five women (39%) and just over one in
four men (26%) have experienced sexual harassment in the workplace in the past
five years. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were more likely to have
experienced workplace sexual harassment than people who are non-Indigenous (53%
and 32% respectively).