Rules about sex: getting them right – upcoming training day

SHINE SA, September 2018

This stand-alone workshop introduces participants to a wide range of education resources that may be borrowed from SHINE SA and provides permanent access to an electronic resource on CD that can be applied immediately in the workplace.

The CD based resource has been produced to assist workers and carers to assess knowledge and teach rules about touch and sexual behaviour and strategies for sexual safety and improved relationships.

In this practical full-day module, you will be supported to apply the resource practically and ethically, using your own laptop.

The aims are to:
> reduce sexual victimisation of people with disability
> reduce the incidence of sexual behaviours which may cause offence to others
> prevent vulnerable people with a disability from involvement with the law and possible long-term consequences of this

Suitable participants include: developmental educators, service coordinators, special
education workers, therapists, disability advocates, police and parents.

Important: Please bring a laptop computer with a CD drive, installed with MS Word,
MS Powerpoint, or equivalent. An external plug-in mouse will be an advantage.

Details:
When – Monday 22 October 2018
Where – SHINE SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville
Time – 9:30am – 4:30pm
Cost – $175

 

The everyday experiences of LGBTI people living with disability

GLHV@ARCSHS, La Trobe University,  July 2018

This report documents the effects of systemic discrimination on the health and wellbeing of LGBTI people with disability.

It is divided into two key sections. The first reviews the national and international research and policy literatures on the impacts of systemic discrimination, disadvantage and social exclusion on the health and wellbeing of LGBTI people with disability and their access to services.

The second, smaller section presents preliminary analyses of unpublished data on LGBT people with disability from Private lives 2: The second national survey of the health and wellbeing of LGBT Australians (2012).

KEY FINDINGS:

The review found that research, policy and practice on the health and wellbeing of LGBTI people with disability in Australia is fragmented, under-resourced and relies on different, sometimes contrary definitions of ‘disability’.

The review documents higher rates of discrimination and reduced service access among LGBTI people with disability compared with people with disability and LGBTI people without disability; greater restrictions on freedom of sexual expression (particularly for LGBTI people with intellectual disability); and reduced social support and connection from both LGBTI and disability communities.

It documents a lack of professional training, resources and support for disability and allied health care workers for LGBTI people with disability. It also found that many disability services and workers are unwilling to address the sexual and gender identity rights and freedoms of LGBTI people with disability.

Sexual activity and sexual health among young adults with/without intellectual disability

BMC Public Health 201818:667

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-5572-9

Abstract

Background

There is widespread concern about the sexual ‘vulnerability’ of young people with intellectual disabilities, but little evidence relating to sexual activity and sexual health.

Method

This paper describes a secondary analysis of the nationally representative longitudinal Next Steps study (formerly the Longitudinal Survey of Young People in England), investigating sexual activity and sexual health amongst young people with mild/moderate intellectual disabilities. This analysis investigated family socio-economic position, young person socio-economic position, household composition, area deprivation, peer victimisation, friendships, sexual activity, unsafe sex, STIs, pregnancy outcomes and parenting.

Results

Most young people with mild/moderate intellectual disabilities have had sexual intercourse by age 19/20, although young women were less likely to have sex prior to 16 than their peers and both men and women with intellectual disabilities were more likely to have unsafe sex 50% or more of the time than their peers. Women with intellectual disabilities were likely to have been pregnant and more likely to be a mother.

Conclusion

Most young people with mild/moderate intellectual disabilities have sex and are more likely to have unsafe sex than their peers. Education and health services need to operate on the assumption that most young people with mild/moderate intellectual disabilities will have sex.

SHINE SA’s FRESH Course: Disability and Mental Health Focus

SHINE SA, October 2017

This dynamic 3-day course aims to update workers to include relationships and sexual health education and support in their work.

On completion of the FRESH Course you will have:side
• an increased level of confidence working with people in the area of sexual health and  relationships
• a better understanding of how values and beliefs may influence your practice in this area of work
• a new vocabulary about sexual health and relationships to use in practice
• skills to support sexual health needs
• developed an understanding of current resources available and how to use them effectively

Topics covered:

• History of Sexuality & Disability
• Contraception & Pregnancy Options
• STIs & Safer Sex
• Healthy Relationships
• Sex & The Law
• Impact of psychotropic medications
• Sexual Violence & Safety
• Sexual & Gender Diversity
• Assessment tools
• Resource exploration
• Communicating about sexuality

WHEN: 14–16 November 2017 (Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday)
WHERE: SHINE SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville
TIME: 9.00 am – 5.00 pm
COST: $399 Student Concession: $359

Rules about sex: getting them right (Training module & CDs): full-day practical module

 

SHine SA, February 2017

A CD-based resource has been produced to assist workers and carers to assess knowledge and teach rules about touch and sexual behaviour and strategies for sexual safety and improved relationships. In this practical full-day module, you will be supported to apply the resource practically and ethically, using your own laptop.

The aims are to:

> reduce sexual victimisation of people with disability

> reduce the incidence of sexual behaviours which may cause offence to others

> prevent vulnerable people with a disability from involvement with the law and possible long-term consequences of this

Suitable participants include: developmental educators, service coordinators, special education workers, therapists, disability advocates, police and parents.

The first CD contains a printable manual including information sheets that help interpret South Australian laws about sexual behaviour in plain English using CAN and SHOULD NOT statements and questions. These relate to consent, age of consent, private places, sexual harassment, sexual abuse, assault and safer sex.

Both CDs contain line drawings which can be used individually, in sequence, or layered electronically or manually to create new resources which are tailored to individual needs.

Facial expressions can be altered to change the emotional tone of illustrations. Images can be combined with photographs of real places and real faces. Potential resources to be produced include flashcards to assist conversation, illustrated social stories, comic strip resources or posters. Final products can be easily sent to users as an email attachment.

The module emphasises sensitive and ethical use of the images as well as practical application to solve the educational needs of individuals.

Important: Please bring a laptop computer with a CD drive, installed with MS Word, MS Powerpoint, or equivalent. An external plug-in mouse will be an advantage.

When 1 March 2017

Where SHine SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville

Time 9:30am – 4:30pm

Cost $175 Student Concession: $157

Enquiries Phone 8300 5356 / Email chelsea.nickels@shinesa.org.au

 

 

More sex please: ending barriers in the bedroom [for people with physical disabilities]

Sydney Morning Herald, November 11, 2015

Now 23, Ariane was born with cerebral palsy spastic quadriplegia, which means she has reduced muscle tone in parts of her body and uses a wheelchair.

It also means, like many people with physical disabilities, she has relied on assistance in the past to lead a normal adult sexual life; including help getting undressed before hopping into bed with her boyfriend at the time (who also had a physical disability).

“There’s this idea that we’re not allowed to have sex, that it’s gross,” says Ariane.

  • Read more of this article here
  • Read about the Deakin University study here