Social housing landlords use domestic violence as reason to evict victims – study

Guardian Australia, Thu 13 Jun 2019 

Social housing landlords are evicting low-income domestic violence survivors because the abuse they suffer can be considered a “nuisance” breach under existing tenancy laws, a new study has found.

Researchers from two universities analysed lease terminations data, nearly 100 state tribunal and court decisions, as well as case studies from housing providers to assess the impact on the nation’s most vulnerable tenants.

 

New Family, Domestic, and Sexual Violence Statistics Directory

Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), 19 December 2018

For the first time, sources of family, domestic and sexual violence statistics have been collated into a central directory by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

The new ‘Directory of Family, Domestic, and Sexual Violence Statistics’ aims to improve the awareness and utilisation of family, domestic, and sexual violence statistics by providing an integrated repository of national and state and territory data sources.

First criminal prosecution of female genital mutilation in Queensland goes to trial today

ABC News, 21/05/18

The first couple to be prosecuted on female genital mutilation charges in Queensland have pleaded not guilty to allegedly taking two girls aged nine and 12 to Africa to undergo the procedure.

The African man and woman—who cannot be named for legal reasons—were charged in 2015 on two counts each of removing a child from the state for female genital mutilation.

Their case is being heard today at a Beenleigh sitting of the District Court.

Challenging misconceptions about sexual offending: report (Link fixed)

Australian Institute of Family Studies, 2017

Reports of sexual offences crimes have increased over the last six years. Despite the prevalence of sexual offending in our communities, there is a lack of understanding about these crimes.

Myths and misconceptions about sexual offending are common. This is understandable, because sexual offending is a profoundly hidden crime. Much of what we know about sexual crime is imagined or gained through mainstream media

Most people would not be fully aware of the vast body of scientific literature regarding sexual offending. This is despite the fact that specialist knowledge is the key to effectively responding to sexual crime in the criminal justice system .

The purpose of this resource is to synthesise over 40 years of research evidence to present an accurate and updated picture of sexual offending. With specialist knowledge, we can work towards improving criminal justice responses
and outcomes in cases of sexual crime.

» This reference booklet addresses some of the most significant myths and misconceptions about adult rape and sexual offences, as well as child sexual abuse.
» The evidence has been collated from an analysis of the psychological and criminological literature.
» It provides a clear picture of what should be considered a misconception, alongside the current evidence of what is considered “typical” and “common” behaviour in both offenders and victims.
» There are multiple ways that this resource could be used. It may be useful as a guide to assist fact finders at different stages of the criminal justice process.

 

Trump-Pence Administration Asserts Civil Rights Laws Won’t Apply to LGBQ People

The Human Rights Campaign, July 26, 2017

Today, HRC issued the following statement in response to an amicus brief filed by the Department of Justice arguing that Title VII does not protect lesbian, gay, or bisexual people on the basis of sex:

“Attacks against the LGBTQ community at all levels of government continue to pour in from the Trump-Pence Administration,” said Sarah Warbelow, HRC Legal Director. “In one fell swoop, Trump’s DOJ has provided a roadmap for dismantling years of federal protections and declared that lesbian, gay, and bisexual people may no longer be protected by landmark civil rights laws such as the Fair Housing Act, Title IX, or Title VII. For over a decade, courts have determined that discrimination on the basis of LGBTQ status is unlawful discrimination under federal law. Today’s filing is a shameful retrenchment of an outmoded interpretation that forfeits faithful interpretation of current law to achieve a politically-driven and legally specious result.”

What does the Anna Stubblefield case teach us about sentencing and sexual assault?

A former chair of philosophy at Rutgers University had sex with a man who can’t speak. The resulting court battle raised questions about when and why suffering matters in sentencing — and Anna Stubblefield went to jail.

Stubblefield had slept with a man known only by the pseudonym DJ, who has cerebral palsy and to this day has never spoken.

That’s not to say he can’t communicate, though it’s not to say he can, either — that’s what is at issue.

Read more here