Evidence Check Review for STI Interventions

Sax Institute for the Centre for Population Health, NSW Ministry of Health, October 2015

This Evidence Check Review reports on the effectiveness of interventions which aim to reduce the transmission of three Sexually Transmissible Infections (STIs): chlamydia, gonorrhoea and syphilis.
This rapid review was commissioned by the Centre for Population Health, New South Wales (NSW) Ministry of Health and the Sax Institute to inform the development of the NSW Sexually Transmissible Infections Strategy 2016–2020.
The focus of this review is on the effectiveness of interventions aiming to reduce the transmission of Sexually Transmissible Infections (STIs) in different settings. Consistent with the developing NSW STI strategy, this review focuses on interventions in relation to testing, treatment, partner notification and prevention of re-infection of three priority STIs (chlamydia, gonorrhoea and syphilis), in five priority settings (primary health care; sexual health services; Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services; antenatal services; and services for young people) for five priority populations (gay and other men who have
sex with men (MSM); gay men living with HIV; young people aged 16–29 years; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and people involved in sex work).
The review was also tasked with identifying evidence for the effectiveness of interventions in additional settings (including but not limited to drug and alcohol services, emergency departments, mental health services and correctional services).

Substantial evidence for the effectiveness of a broad range of interventions is identified. There are wide variations in the level of resources which are required, with the more expensive interventions not always shown to be the most effective.

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