Gay Asian Proud free online event this Friday 18th September

Thorne Harbour Health, 16th September 2020

Gay Asian Proud (GAP) is excited to organise an online chat, Questioning Stereotypes And Assumptions, this Friday, 18 September, 6.00 PM – 8.00 PM pm AEST (5.30 PM  – 7.30 PM SA time). 

We welcome all GAP members, and Asian same-sex attracted men (cis and transgender).

If you are not a GAP member yet, please email gap@thorneharbour.org to be placed on our mailing list. We will invite you to upcoming events.

We want to hear your experience with stereotypes about Asian gay and bisexual men, the assumptions we make based on our cultural upbringing, our inherent bias, and how we could address them in a respectful way that facilitates intercultural understanding. This is your platform. We want to hear you talk.

Facilitated by James & Amirul, Coordinators of Gay Asian Proud (GAP), a social support group for Asian gay & bisexual men (cis and transgender).

Sign up now at Eventbrite to claim your FREE ticket! We can’t wait to see you this Friday! 

 

Life satisfaction and mental health among transgender students

Life satisfaction and mental health among transgender students in Norway

Anderssen, N., Sivertsen, B., Lønning, K.J. et al.

BMC Public Health 20, 138 (2020)

Background

Social attitudes to transgender persons and other gender minorities vary around the world, and in many cultures, prejudices and social stigma are common. Consequently, transgender persons face challenges related to discrimination and negative attitudes among the public. The purpose of this study was to compare life satisfaction, loneliness, mental health, and suicidal behavior among transgender students with cisgender students’ experiences in a nationwide sample of Norwegian students pursuing higher education.

Methods

In total,50,054 full-time Norwegian students completed an online questionnaire (response rate 30.8%), of whom 15,399 were cisgender males, 34,437 cisgender females, 28 individuals who reported being binary transgender (12 transwomen and 16 transmen), and 69 individuals non-binary transgender persons. The measures included questions concerning gender identity, life satisfaction (Satisfaction With Life Scale), loneliness (The Three-Item Loneliness Scale), mental health problems (Hopkins Symptoms Check List), mental disorders, and suicidal ideation, suicidal behavior, and self-harm. Chi-square tests, Independent-Samples Kruskal-Wallis tests, and logistic regression analyses were used to examine differences between gender identities.

Results

Transgender students reported significantly more psychosocial burdens on all measures. There were no significant differences in any of the measures between the binary and non-binary transgender students.

Conclusion

The findings call for increased awareness about welfare and health for transgender students in Norway. Higher education institutions need to consider measures at various levels to establish a learning environment that is more inclusive for gender minorities.

How pregnancy can be made more difficult by maternity care’s notions of ‘normal’

The Conversation, October 8, 2019 10.04pm AEDT

Maternity records in the UK have spaces only for the expectant mother and the baby’s father. This inflexibility can cause difficulties for the pregnant person, their partner, and their unborn baby if they do not fit into these boxes.

Over the last decade there has been a significant increase in the number of people conceiving outside of the traditional model of a heterosexual couple, so this affects an increasing number of parents.

Research shows that problems occur when heteronormativity – the perception that heterosexuality is the normal, default, or preferred sexual orientation – is communicated either overtly or subtly in the way healthcare staff treat patients, the way leaflets are worded, or the assumptions made in the way administration systems are designed.

Hyde Street Practice: a service of SHINE SA

SHINE SA, September 2019

Hyde Street Practice is a service of SHINE SA. We offer affordable appointments with friendly and non-judgemental staff.

We are a safe and inclusive practice with general practitioners, specialist services, sexual health and relationship wellbeing services.

Services include:

  • General Practitioners

General GP services, including support for diabetes and cardiovascular health, Pre and post exposure HIV prevention (PEP and PrEP), HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C prescribing, STI testing and management

  • Sexual Health Services

SHINE SA sexual health services including contraception, STI testing and management, HIV, PEP & PrEP

  • Sexual Health Physician

A private specialist sexual health and HIV service available by referral

HIV, sexual health, PEP & PrEP, hepatitis C, transgender medicine, LGBTI health

  • Rapido – Rapid HIV Testing

Walk in and Wait service, peer led with results in 20 minutes

  • Psychologist and Counselling

General psychological services and sexual health counselling

  • Gender Wellbeing Service

Professional, peer support and information services for people who are questioning their gender or who identify as trans or gender diverse

  • SAMESH

Support services for gay men, MSM (men who have sex with men), trans men and people living with HIV and people at risk of HIV and STIs, health promotion and education

  • Bobby Goldsmith Foundation

Financial assistance for health related issues to people living with HIV on low incomes

Details:

57 Hyde Street, Adelaide
Call 7099 5320
Monday – Friday 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Fees available on hydestreet.com.au
To make an appointment visit
www.hydestreet.com.au

or call 7099 5320

Rapido – Rapid HIV Testing
Mondays 3:00 – 6:00 pm
(except Public Holidays)

Sexual Health Service
Walk in and Wait
Fridays 1:00 – 4:00 pm

Clean Needle Program
Monday – Friday 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

STIs among transgender men and women attending Australian sexual health clinics

Med J Aust. 2019 Aug 29. doi: 10.5694/mja2.50322. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

Objectives

To estimate rates of HIV infection, chlamydia, gonorrhoea, and infectious syphilis in transgender men and women in Australia; to compare these rates with those for cisgender people.

Design

Cross‐sectional, comparative analysis of de‐identified health data.

Setting, participants

We analysed data for 1260 transgender people (404 men, 492 women, 364 unrecorded gender), 78 108 cisgender gay and bisexual men, and 309 740 cisgender heterosexual people who attended 46 sexual health clinics across Australia during 2010–2017.

Main outcome measures

First‐visit test positivity for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), stratified by patient group and year; demographic and behavioural factors associated with having STIs.

Results

14 of 233 transgender men (6.0%) and 34 of 326 transgender women (10%) tested during first clinic visits were chlamydia‐positive; nine transgender men (4%) and 28 transgender women (8.6%) were gonorrhoea‐positive. One of 210 tested transgender men (0.5%) and ten of 324 tested transgender women (3.1%) were diagnosed with infectious syphilis; 14 transgender men (3.5%) and 28 transgender women (5.7%) were HIV‐positive at their first visit. The only significant change in prevalence of an STI among transgender patients during the study period was the increased rate of gonorrhoea among transgender women (from 3.1% to 9.8%). Compared with cisgender gay and bisexual men, transgender men were less likely (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.46; 95% CI, 0.29–0.71; P = 0.001) and transgender women as likely (aOR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.73–1.32; P = 0.92) to be diagnosed with a bacterial STI; compared with heterosexual patients, transgender men were as likely (aOR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.46–1.13; P = 0.16) and transgender women more likely (aOR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.16–2.10; P = 0.003) to receive a first‐visit bacterial STI diagnosis.

Conclusions

The epidemiology of STIs in transgender people attending Australian sexual health clinics differs from that of cisgender patients. Gender details must be captured by health data systems to facilitate appropriate delivery of sexual health care.

Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer Men’s Attitudes and Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Assault

Sorting it out: Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer Men’s Attitudes and Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Assault

Sexualities and Genders Research (SaGR), Western Sydney University & ACON, May 2019

This research on Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer (GBTIQ) men’s attitudes and experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual assault (SA) was undertaken in 2017-2018.

Sexualities and Genders Research (SaGR), at Western Sydney University was commissioned to undertake the survey by ACON (formerly known as AIDS Council of New South Wales), who collaborated in the survey design and analysis. An online survey was completed by 895 GBTIQ-identifying men, primarily focusing on IPV in same-sex relationships.

However, the survey included questions about SA, with some men providing additional
information on SA in the open-ended questions in the survey.

The survey did not ask specific questions about criminal victimisation or perpetration in relationships but was instead focused on men’s views and experiences of healthy and unhealthy relationships.

Overview of findings:
• GBTIQ men want healthy and safe relationships for themselves, their friends and community.
• GBTIQ men are certain about the illegality and unacceptability of sexual assault and
domestic violence