Free workshop series on Sexuality and Intellectual Disability

South Australian Council on Intellectual Disability, July 2020

Sexuality and Relationships is an essential area of learning for people with an intellectual disability. Adults with intellectual disability say they want to learn together in their own right. Parents and carers can make a big difference in small ways by improving their own knowledge and using supportive approaches.

These interactive workshops will be presented in both the northern and southern suburbs of Adelaide. All workshops are free of charge.

Handouts and resources will be provided during the workshops.

Workshops for parents of people with intellectual disability: Each region will have a set of four 1-day education workshops for parents. The introductory workshop Sexuality and Disability is offered three times. It is recommended that you try to attend one of these sessions before attending others. You can enrol in one or more of the workshops. The Puberty and Adolescence Workshop will be held at the Special Education Resource Unit of the Department of Education in Henley Beach (SERU). This is so that parents of school-age children can become familiar with the range of resources available to them and their children for use at home and at school.
Other sessions will be held in a variety of venues. Parents will have first priority and support workers may also attend if numbers allow.

There will also be a series of four workshops for adults with intellectual disability.

Please see flyer for more information.

Information about Gender-Based Violence for People with Disabilities

What to do if someone hurts you or does bad things to you: Information about Gender-Based Violence for People with Disabilities

Human Rights Watch, March 2015

Women and girls with disabilities are too often the victims of violence, yet get too little information on where to go for help. Information on gender-based violence needs to reach the people who need it most, especially women and girls with disabilities. This resource, produced in easy to read language was developed by Human Rights Watch in collaboration with disabled persons’ organisations (DPOs) and gender-based violence service providers. The resource shows how to recognise, prevent, and protect against gender-based violence, including by distinguishing between “good” and “bad” touch, and explains how to seek legal, medical, and psychosocial support.

Download resource (PDF) via the following link: Gender based violence ETR final