Sex and gender: modifiers of health, disease, and medicine

The Lancet, Volume 396, Issue 10250, 22–28 August 2020, Pages 565-582
Mauvais-Jarvis, F., et al

Clinicians can encounter sex and gender disparities in diagnostic and therapeutic responses. These disparities are noted in epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, disease progression, and response to treatment. This Review discusses the fundamental influences of sex and gender as modifiers of the major causes of death and morbidity. We articulate how the genetic, epigenetic, and hormonal influences of biological sex influence physiology and disease, and how the social constructs of gender affect the behaviour of the community, clinicians, and patients in the health-care system and interact with pathobiology. We aim to guide clinicians and researchers to consider sex and gender in their approach to diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases as a necessary and fundamental step towards precision medicine, which will benefit men’s and women’s health.

 

Online training: Hepatitis C in Primary Care

ASHM, August 2020

This training aims to provide participants with the knowledge and confidence to pursue the management of HCV in their primary care setting.

Primary care providers can play a critical role in the elimination of hepatitis C in Australia by 2030.

This workshop will provide an overview of the management of HCV in primary care
settings, including case finding, testing, patient assessment and treatment.

Learning Objectives:

• Identify priority populations for HCV screening
• Order and interpret tests appropriately to diagnose chronic HCV infection
• Describe the recommended pre-treatment assessment
• Demonstrate understanding of antiviral therapy for treatment of HCV
• Communicate confidently with patients about HCV

Webinar Presenter: Dr Alireza Ahmavand, General Practitioner, Arafura Medical Clinics – Casuarina

Target Audience:
General Practitioners, Nurse Practitioners, nurses, primary care-based practitioners
and other health care workers.

When: Wednesday 19 August 2020 7.30pm – 9.00pm AEST  (7 – 9.30 pm ACST)

Delivered online, free

This activity is allocated 3 activity points in the RACGP QI&CPD Program for the
2020-2022 Triennium.

For further details or assistance contact: Molly Stannard

 

Case report: HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder & myelopathy in patient with preserved CD4, but high viral load

HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder and HIV-associated myelopathy in a patient with a preserved CD4, but high viral load-a rarely reported phenomenon: a case report and literature review. 

Ayele, B.A., Amogne, W. & Gemechu, L.

BMC Infect Dis 20, 574 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12879-020-05297-9

This case supports the current understanding regarding the persistent occurrence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder and HIV-associated myelopathy even decades after introduction of cART. Therefore, it’s important to screen HIV+ patients for the HAND and HAM even if they have relatively preserved immunity.

Because patient can be easily shifted to ART drugs with better CNS penetrating potential to achieve acceptable virological suppression level, to observe sound clinical improvement.

Abnormal Uterine Bleeding – RACGP seminar by Dr Amy Moten

RACGP, August 2020

SHINE SA’s Sexual Health Practitioner, Dr Amy Moten will be presenting an online webinar on behalf of the RACGP on Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.  

Abnormal uterine bleeding is a common presentation in general practice with heavy menstrual bleeding affecting 25% of people who are menstruating. This presentation will discuss the common causes of heavy menstrual bleeding and other menstrual irregularities and describe appropriate investigation and management of abnormal uterine bleeding.

COST: FREE (for RACGP Members)
DATE: Tuesday 11 August 2020
TIME: 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm ACST

 

Marie Stopes Australia seeks signatories to open letter re changes to telehealth

July 2020
 
There are changes to Telehealth from Monday, July 20th which mean that clients who have not attended a service within the last 12 months – that is, new clients or clients who have not used a service in the last 12 months – will no longer be eligible for a Telehealth appointment.
 
Marie Stopes Australia has written an open letter about the impact of this change access to sexual and reproductive health services. If you are interested in endorsing the letter, you can add your name as a private individual or an organisation. 
 

Stigma towards people who inject drugs and sex workers prevalent, according to new Australian study

Centre for Social Research in Health, UNSW, July 2020

Priority groups at risk of blood borne viruses and sexually transmissible infections are still likely to experience negative behaviour from the general public and in healthcare settings according to a recent report from the Stigma Indicators Monitoring Project.

86% of the general public sampled self-reported that they would behave negatively towards people who inject drugs to some extent, as did 56% of healthcare workers and 55% of healthcare students. Additionally, 64% of the general public, and 36% and 31% of healthcare workers and students respectively, self-reported likely negative behaviour (to some extent) towards sex workers.