Could It Be HIV? Video for GPs

Thorne Harbour Health, November 2017

‘Could it be HIV?’ features of the story of Abby Landy, whose story is all-too-common for the many individuals who are given a late HIV diagnosis.

Produced with the support of ViiV healthcare, this video encourages clinicians and doctors to ‘consider HIV’. This clip also features Professor Jenny Hoy from Alfred Health.

“This video is vital. We shouldn’t be missing opportunities to diagnose HIV. With a late diagnoses, there is already substantial damage to the immune system. Diagnosing HIV in a timely manner is paramount — for the benefit of the individual as well as the benefit of the broader community’s health and wellbeing.” – Jenny Hoy

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What’s new in HIV and hep C? An update for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers

Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine (ASHM), June 2019

This Deadly Sex Update webinar provides Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and community workers with an introduction and the latest news in hepatitis C and HIV.

The information presented supports health workers to discuss key messages with clients and the community around hep C and HIV, including testing, prevention, current treatments and management.

Presenter: Dr Darren Russell, Director of Cairns Sexual Health.
Presented on: Monday 10 June 2019

What’s new in HIV and hep C? An update for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers. Dr Darren Russell, June 2019 from ASHM on Vimeo.

HIV and viral hepatitis disclosure [in South Australia] – factsheet

SA Health, updated 2019

Deciding to disclose your HIV or viral hepatitis (hepatitis B or hepatitis C) status is a personal choice. There are few situations where you are legally required to disclose your HIV or viral hepatitis status, however, there may be times when it’s in your best interests to disclose your status even if you are not legally required to do so.

 

Koala retrovirus leads scientists to discover ‘second immune system’

ABC Science, 12/10/2019

The retrovirus spreading through the koala population is bad news. But studies of the koala infection have led scientists to a surprising discovery: a “second immune system” in the species, according to research published on Saturday in the journal Cell.

This system, which the researchers think exists in all mammals, has a role fighting off viruses that are in the same class as deadly human diseases such as HIV. This “second immune system” may illuminate new ways to treat HIV, said Damian Purcell, who heads up virology research at the Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity.

In contrast to Australia’s success with hepatitis C, our response to hepatitis B is lagging

The Conversation, October 15th, 2019

Around one-third of Australians living with hepatitis C have been cured in the last four years. Australia’s response to hepatitis C is seen as a leading example around the world, and the elimination of the disease as a major public health threat is looking like an increasingly achievable goal.

But the situation is much less promising for Australians living with hepatitis B, which is now the most common blood-borne viral infection in Australia. It affects more people than hepatitis C and HIV combined.

STI and BBV control in remote communities: Clinical practice and resource manual

SAHMRI / Young Deadly Free, 2019

This manual was developed by SAHMRI as part of the Young Deadly Free project, to support clinicians in efforts to boost STI and BBV testing rates for young people living in and visiting remote communities.

The manual provides tips on offering STI and BBV testing as part of routine consults with young people; collates the various STI and BBV clinical guidelines relevant to regional and remote communities; catalogues induction and training resources; and features Young Deadly Free health promotion resources for use in community education. The manual is designed as an induction and training kit, and for daily use by doctors, nurses and Aboriginal Health Workers.