Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer Men’s Attitudes and Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Assault

Sorting it out: Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer Men’s Attitudes and Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Assault

Sexualities and Genders Research (SaGR), Western Sydney University & ACON, May 2019

This research on Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer (GBTIQ) men’s attitudes and experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual assault (SA) was undertaken in 2017-2018.

Sexualities and Genders Research (SaGR), at Western Sydney University was commissioned to undertake the survey by ACON (formerly known as AIDS Council of New South Wales), who collaborated in the survey design and analysis. An online survey was completed by 895 GBTIQ-identifying men, primarily focusing on IPV in same-sex relationships.

However, the survey included questions about SA, with some men providing additional
information on SA in the open-ended questions in the survey.

The survey did not ask specific questions about criminal victimisation or perpetration in relationships but was instead focused on men’s views and experiences of healthy and unhealthy relationships.

Overview of findings:
• GBTIQ men want healthy and safe relationships for themselves, their friends and community.
• GBTIQ men are certain about the illegality and unacceptability of sexual assault and
domestic violence

Informed consent, individual care vital to ensure reproductive rights of transgender Australians

The Conversation

By Damien Riggs

July 11, 2018 6.02am AEST

For any person needing medical care, informed consent is vital. Yet for transgender people, informed consent may be hindered by how medical professionals share information. This is especially the case in the context of reproductive health, where speaking about reproductive materials is often highly gendered.

Both the World Professional Association for Transgender Health Standards of Care and the Royal Children’s Hospital’s Standards of Care and Treatment Guidelines for Trans and Gender Diverse Children and Adolescents emphasise the importance of discussing fertility preservation as an option for transgender people. Yet little guidance is given on how to do so in ways that are inclusive.

SAMESH Newsletter Spring 2017

SAMESH, 20/09/2017

The Spring newsletter is now available from SAMESH: South Australia Mobilisation + Empowerment for Sexual Health.

SAMESH provides support, education and training about Sexual Health and HIV for men who have sex with men and people living with HIV, as well as services for the broader LGBTIQ community, in South Australia. It is a joint program of SHine SA and VAC.

The updated 2017 ASHM HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) Guidelines

Journal of Virus Eradication, 2017; 3: 168–184

Daily use of co-formulated tenofovir and emtricitabine for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) by populations at high risk of HIV infection is now recommended in guidelines from the United States, Europe and Australia and globally through the 2015 WHO guidelines. 

These 2017 Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine‘s (ASHM) PrEP Guidelines are an updated adaptation of the 2014 US Centers for Disease Control‘s PrEP guidelines and are designed to:

    • Support the prescription of PrEP using forms of coformulated tenofovir and emtricitabine that have been registered in Australia by the Therapeutic Goods Administration and other bioequivalent generic drugs that are available in Australia through self-importation, private prescription or Australian PrEP clinical trials
    • Assist clinicians in the evaluation of patients who are seeking PrEP
    • Assist clinicians in commencing and monitoring patients on PrEP including PrEP dosing schedules, management of side-effects and toxicity, use of PrEP in pregnancy and in chronic hepatitis B infection and how to cease PrEP

Daily PrEP with co-formulated tenofovir and emtricitabine, used continuously or for shorter periods of time, is recommended in these guidelines as a key HIV-prevention option for men who have sex with men (MSM), transgender men and women, heterosexual men and women, and people who inject drugs (PWID) at substantial risk of HIV acquisition.

Working with a transgender man who is pregnant

The Nurse Path blog, February 10., 2017

Some men have vaginas. 

It probably wouldn’t happen very often but if you are a health professional who cares for people during pregnancy and birth (ie a Midwife or Doctor), you may come across a transgender man who is pregnant.

This can be really challenging for people who may not have come across transgender people or issues. This is a guide to maybe help you in that situation. You’re welcome.

Read more here 

 

Invitation to to parents, carers, support people, friends & family of someone who is a trans man

Below is an open invite from FTMen-SA to parents, carers, support people, friends and family to someone who is a trans man. Please RSVP via FTMen-SA@hotmail.com if you would like to attend.

Are you a parent, carer, partner, support person, best friend etc. to someone who is FTM (female to male) transgender, a transman or transmasculine?

Do they attend the FTMen-SA meetings or have been thinking about coming along?

If you answered yes to both of these questions then we invite you to attend an FTMen-SA meeting with your transman/transmasc person.

Meeting details:

  • Wednesday the 21st of September.
  • 6.30-8.30pm
  • 57 Hyde Street, Adelaide 5000 (SAMESH)
  • There is no minimum or maximum age for participants, all are welcome.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander Persons and those from Culturally Diverse backgrounds are encouraged to come along.
  • Facilitators are trained human service workers with Police and DCSI clearances.

 FTMen-SA would like to gently remind those wishing to attend that these meetings are normally closed to the greater community to respect the privacy and confidentiality of participants. Those wishing to attend are asked to please respect the confidentiality of those present including not disclosing their gender status, discussions and images outside the meeting space. 

We encourage this as a great way for those unsure about coming along to have a chance to meet some of the group members, meet the facilitators and explore the SAMESH site and its services. Some members will be happy to answer respectful questions and to share their journey; its a great way to learn from lived experience!

If you have any questions please email ftmen-sa@hotmail.com

ftmensa