Sexual & Reproductive Health Resource Kit for Aboriginal young people

Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council of New South Wales, 2018

The AH&MRC has developed a new vibrant Sexual and Reproductive Health Resource Kit for workers to use with Aboriginal young people named “DOIN ‘IT’ RIGHT!”.

DOIN IT RIGHT! provides workers who work with young Aboriginal people (including non-sexual health and non-Aboriginal workers) with step by step instructions on delivering sexual and reproductive health activities appropriately.

Although the statistics are sobering, ongoing education and health promotion will assist young Aboriginal people to make informed choices about their sexual and reproductive health. Given the decreasing age of first sexual experience, high rates of STIs and teen pregnancy, it is important that age and culturally appropriate information and education is provided to young people from an early age.

Contents:

Introduction
Introduction to Sexual and Reproductive Health ……………………………….. 6
Sexual and Reproductive Health in an Aboriginal Context …………………. 7
Aboriginal Cultural Considerations and the Worker’s Role in Sexual
and Reproductive Health Education …………………………………………………. 9
Working with Aboriginal Young People …………………………………………….. 11
Disclosure ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 13
Organisational Philosophy, Policies and Procedures ………………………… 14
How to Generate Conversations ……………………………………………………….. 15
How to use this Kit …………………………………………………………………………… 19
Welcome to Country and Acknowledgment of Country………………………. 21
Group Agreement …………………………………………………………………………….. 23
Opportunity for Anonymous Questions to be Asked Safely………………… 24

1 Looking After Me
Section Introduction ………………………………………………………………………… 27
Changes When Growing Up
Changing Bodies …………………………………………………………………….. 28
Knowing Your Reproductive System and How It All Works ………. 33

2 My Sexuality and How I Feel About Myself

Section Introduction………………………………………………………………………….. 47
Sexuality and me
Sexuality and Sexual Diversity. Step Forward, Step Back ………….. 48
Myths and Stereotypes about Sexuality ……………………………………. 63
Sexuality and Popular Culture ………………………………………………….. 67
Self Esteem
Self Esteem. I Like Me! …………………………………………………………….. 69

3 Sex, Pregnancy and Keeping Safe
Section Introduction …………………………………………………………………………. 76
Sexual Health – What’s Safe and What’s Not
Healthy Vs Unhealthy ………………………………………………………………. 77
High Risk, Low Risk, No Risk …………………………………………………… 87
Sexually Transmissible Infection Information Sheets ………………… 97
Safer Sex STI & Pregnancy Prevention
Contraception and Safer Sex. Methods and Myths ……………………. 113
Using a Condom – DOIN ‘IT’ RIGHT! …………………………………………. 118
Contraception and Safer Sex Information Sheets ……………………… 125

4 Coming to a Decision
Section Introduction …………………………………………………………………………. 142
Sexual and Other Important Decisions
What’s Most Important …………………………………………………………….. 143
Values and Decisions ………………………………………………………………. 152
Decision Tree and Me ………………………………………………………………. 155
I Can Say No!……………………………………………………………………………. 159
What’s Drugs Got To Do With It?
Are You Thinking What I’m Thinking? ………………………………………. 168
Sex, Drugs and Your Choices ………………………………………………….. 175

5 Evaluation
Section Introduction …………………………………………………………………………. 180
What is evaluation …………………………………………………………………… 181
Types of program evaluation …………………………………………………… 182
Planning your evaluation …………………………………………………………. 183
Data collection methods ………………………………………………………….. 185
Documenting activities ……………………………………………………………. 189
Participant feedback ………………………………………………………………… 191
Further evaluation resources …………………………………………………… 192

6 Additional Resources and Information Pages
Section Introduction ………………………………………………………………………… 194
Glossary of Terms ……………………………………………………………………………. 195
Resources and Organisation Contact Details ……………………………………. 202
Broad Sexual and Reproductive Health Information and
Resources……………………………………………………………………………….. 204
Information and Resources for Parents and Carers…………………… 208
Puberty Information and Resources …………………………………………. 209
Contraceptives Information and Resources ……………………………… 211
Pregnancy and Parenting Information and Resources……………….. 213
Sexually Transmissible Infections Information and Resources…… 215
Sexting Information and Resources…………………………………………… 219
Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Information and
Resources……………………………………………………………………………….. 220
Alcohol and Other Drugs Information and Resources ……………….. 221
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex, Queer (LGBTIQ)
and Same Sex Couples Information and Resources…………………… 224
Blood Borne Viruses: HIV and Hepatitis Information and
Resources……………………………………………………………………………….. 226
Social Emotional Wellbeing Health Information and Resources…. 229
Legal Information and Resources………………………………………………. 231
References ………………………………………………………………………………………. 233

 

Resource Kit – Young People and Sexual Health

NSW STI Programs Unit, 2017

The Resource Kit contians tools, fact sheets, activities and protocols for working with young people around sexual health.

Tools supporting organisations to engage in sexual health

Sexual health tools and fact sheets for workers

Fun games to start the sexual health conversations

SHINE SA’s FRESH Course: Disability and Mental Health Focus

SHINE SA, October 2017

This dynamic 3-day course aims to update workers to include relationships and sexual health education and support in their work.

On completion of the FRESH Course you will have:side
• an increased level of confidence working with people in the area of sexual health and  relationships
• a better understanding of how values and beliefs may influence your practice in this area of work
• a new vocabulary about sexual health and relationships to use in practice
• skills to support sexual health needs
• developed an understanding of current resources available and how to use them effectively

Topics covered:

• History of Sexuality & Disability
• Contraception & Pregnancy Options
• STIs & Safer Sex
• Healthy Relationships
• Sex & The Law
• Impact of psychotropic medications
• Sexual Violence & Safety
• Sexual & Gender Diversity
• Assessment tools
• Resource exploration
• Communicating about sexuality

WHEN: 14–16 November 2017 (Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday)
WHERE: SHINE SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville
TIME: 9.00 am – 5.00 pm
COST: $399 Student Concession: $359

Consent flowchart – education tool

Planned Parenthood Toronto, [2015?]

The consent flowchart has been designed to help young people understand how consent is negotiated.

People follow the instructional bubbles until they reach the end. They can continue each time they choose a consent option. If they choose an option where consent is not given, they land on an orange bubble and must go back to the beginning and start over. 

Yellow bubbles show different possible reposes to lack of consent.

Consent is not just about sex, as this chart shows.

Queering Sex Ed (QSE), which created this resource, is a project at Planned Parenthood Toronto, developing sex ed resources with and for LGBTQ youth. They create resources which are:

 

  • Inclusive
  • Accessible
  • Sex-positive
  • Includes trans* and cis people
  • Asexual positive
  • Doesn’t assume identity
  • Youth positive
  • Body positive
  • Empowering, not fear/shame based
  • Opens rather than closes possibilities
  • Accounts for pleasure
  • Awesome

Download the consent flowchart (PDF) here 

Grindr, virtual reality and vlogging: new ways to talk about sexual health

The Guardian, July 21st, 2017

Almost half the world’s population is online and billions of young people use social media. So why doesn’t more sex education happen across these channels?

The first Global Advisory Board for Sexual Health and Wellbeing brings together a group of individuals from across the world who are using innovative ways to reach more people with information about sex and relationships. Here are some of the projects they’ve been working on.

Young, deadly, STI and BBV free: resources

South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, 2017

This website is a one-stop shop for resources about STIs and BBVs. Rates of STIs and BBVs in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities have been way too high for way too long – especially affecting young people in regional and remote communities.

It’s time to turn this around. This means making regular sexual health checks a normal part of life for sexually active young people – without stigma and without shame. We need to encourage people in remote communities to test for STIs and BBVs. This starts with educating people in remote communities about STIs and BBVs and getting whole communities involved in getting rates down.

These resources have been developed and collated by the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute as part of two initiatives funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health:

  • the Remote STI and BBV Project, Young, deadly, STI and BBV free
  • the Young, deadly, syphilis free campaign

There are resources for young people in remote Aboriginal communities, as well as resources for parents, Elders, teachers and other community leaders – with tips on how the whole community can work with young people to encourage STI and BBV testing, and knockout STIs and BBVs.

SAHMRI is also developing resources for clinicians working in remote communities, providing links to testing and treatment guidelines and practical tips on engaging with young people on difficult topics such as sex, sexuality, and drug and alcohol use.