Disability Support Toolkit for frontline workers – violence and abuse

1800RESPECT, March 2020

The Disability Support Toolkit has resources for front line workers supporting people with disability who have been impacted by violence and abuse.

People with disability are 1.8 times more likely to experience violence and abuse, including more varied forms of abuse. (Source: AIHW Report 2019.) They are also less likely, and take longer to reach out for support.

This Toolkit includes:

  • Research paper on best practice to implement the disability toolkit
  • Videos to share with clients on how to contact the 1800RESPECT service and how the service works
  • Easy English booklets that can be downloaded or ordered free from 1800RESPECT.

This Toolkit can be used in conjunction with information provided on our website on Inclusive Practice: Supporting people with disability.

‘Putting it into practice’ Guidelines

The ‘Putting it into Practice’ guidelines are a resource to support access and inclusion. The guidelines provide information on:

  • General principles
  • Engaging women with disabilities, including language
  • Using specialist resources

 

  • Download the guidelines in Word or PDF.

Scope Videos

This set of 3 videos were co-developed by Scope and 1800RESPECT. They are designed to be viewed by people with disability, and include information on how to contact 1800RESPECT, and how the service works.

  • Watch the videos here

Easy English booklets

The Easy English booklets have been developed as part of the Disability Pathways Project and with Women with Disabilities Australia. They are evidence based, user group tested and easy to use.

Sunny app

Sunny is 1800RESPECT’s app for women with disability who have experienced violence and abuse. Sunny has been co-designed with women with disability to make sure it provides the very best support for the people who use it. Learn more about Sunny. Sunny is free to download and is free to use on your phone.

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Female genital mutilation in children presenting to Australian paediatricians

Arch Dis Child doi:10.1136/archdischild-2016-311540

Abstract

Objective The WHO reports that female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is an ancient cultural practice prevalent in many countries. FGM/C has been reported among women resident in Australia. Our paper provides the first description of FGM/C in Australian children.

Design Cross-sectional survey conducted in April–June 2014.

Setting Paediatricians and other child health specialists recruited through the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit were asked to report children aged <18 years with FGM/C seen in the last 5 years, and to provide data for demographics, FGM/C type, complications and referral for each case.

Participants Of 1311 eligible paediatricians/child health specialists, 1003 (76.5%) responded.

Results Twenty-three (2.3%) respondents had seen 59 children with FGM/C and provided detailed data for 31. Most (89.7%) were identified during refugee screening and were born in Africa. Three (10.3%) were born in Australia: two had FGM/C in Australia and one in Indonesia. All parents were born overseas, mainly Africa (98.1%). Ten children had WHO FGM/C type I, five type II, five type III and six type IV. Complications in eight children included recurrent genitourinary infections, menstrual, sexual, fertility and psychological problems. Nineteen children (82.6%) were referred to obstetrics/gynaecology: 16 (69.9%) to social work and 13 (56.5%) to child protection.

Conclusions This study confirms that FGM/C is seen in paediatric clinical practice within Australia. Paediatricians need cultural awareness, education and resources to help them identify children with FGM/C and/or at risk of FGM/C, to enable appropriate referral and counselling of children, families and communities to assist in the prevention of this practice.

Access full text (open access) here

Respectful and Inclusive Work Practices (LGBTI Communities and Sex Workers): Workshop

SIN and SHIne SA, Jnaury 2017

Respectful and Inclusive Work Practices (LGBTI Communities and Sex Workers): Workshop for Health and Community Workers, GPs, Nurses and Midwives

LGBTI Communities: 

This workshop aims to provide health workers with the knowledge and skills to incorporate into their practice a culture of safety and respect for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) staff, clients or other stakeholders.
Implementing such an approach benefits the practitioner, the client and organisations as a whole by creating a culture that values and upholds diversity of all kinds.

Sex Worker Sensitivity Training:

It is estimated that 1 in 64 South Australian women will engage in sex work at some point in their life. Sex Industry Network (SIN) is a South Australian peer organisation, offering support services to local sex workers. Come along and be educated by the experts around all aspects of sex work, and how to engage respectfully with sex workers, in order to provide the best possible services to this marginalised group of people.

When
Friday 10 February 2017
10.00 am – 4.00 pm
Where
SHine SA
64c Woodville Road, Woodville
Cost
$150 (Student concession $110)
Includes lunch & refreshments

Enquiries
Email: shinesacoursesATshinesa.org.au

Forum this Friday – intersectional diversity: CALD and LGBTIQ

SHine SA, July 2016

Our identities often fall into several groups at one time. We call this intersectionality. This can lead to particular issues for people.
What are the issues faced by culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) people who also identify as LGBTIQ?
Join us as we explore the issues faced by CALD LGBTIQ people, including:
> Homophobia
> Racism
> Invisibility
> Stigma and discrimination
> Exclusion and isolation
> Impact on health and wellbeing

We will discuss personal and professional experiences.

The session will be facilitated by Khadija Gbla. Panel members include:
> Ben Yi (Community Support Worker, PEACE Multicultural Services)
> Anisa Varasteh (Community Service Coordinator, PEACE Multicultural Services)
> Leah Sarkanj (Social Worker, Multicultural Youth SA)
> Sharna Ciotti (Senior Social Worker, Families SA)

When 15 July 2016 (Friday)
Where SHine SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville
Time 1.30 – 4.30 pm
Cost $50 (Student Concession $25) – Light refreshments provided.

There are still places left, online enrolment here:
www.shinesa.org.au/events/refresh-forums

Enquiries Phone 8300 5317 / Email shinesacourses@shinesa.org.au

New website for FGM information in Australia

August 2015

No FGM Australia is a not-for-profit organisation which aims to protect Australian girls from female genital mutilation, and to support and empower survivors of FGM. They have recently launched their new website, which contains information resources, and a reporting mechanism for suspected FGM on Australian girls. 

Their resources are tailored to specific professions:

  • social workers
  • GPs
  • teachers
  • child care workers nurses & midwives
  • police
  • immigration officers
  • lawyers

There is also information on FGM and the law.

  • Access professional resources here
  • Access FAQs about FGM here
  • Report a suspected case of FGM involving a child – information here