Factsheet on the new The Marriage Law Survey (Additional Safeguards) Bill 2017

The Equality Campaign, 18/09/2017

The Marriage Law Survey (Additional Safeguards) Bill 2017 was introduced into parliament (and passed) at the end of last week. Included as a part of the bill was a series of temporary measures to protect people from vilification, harassment or threats of harm during the current postal survey campaign.

Also included as a part of the bill is a series of requirements in relation to campaign materials (including any form of external communication) and advertising, that are papplicable to any individual or organisation during the postal survey campaign period.

Measures and requirements that have been introduced into the bill are only applicable until the date in which the Australian Bureau of Statistics is due to announce the results of the Marriage Law Postal Survey, on 15 November 2017.

The attached fact sheet has been prepared by the Equality Campaign to assist stakeholders with activities for the upcoming campaign period. Included are the responsibilities and considerations that organisations need to review prior to distributing any material or communicating in any form that has the intent of encouraging participation in the Marriage Law Postal Survey or encouraging a vote one way or the other. The fact sheet contains essential information and new requirements that are applicable for the next eight weeks. Please note that these provisions took effect from Thursday 14 September 2017.

Same-sex marriage survey sparks spike in access of LGBTI mental health support

ABC News, 18/8/2017

A national mental health service for young people and their parents say they have experienced a spike in clients accessing LGBTI support services during the highly charged same-sex marriage postal survey period.

ReachOut CEO Jono Nicholas said there had been a 20 per cent increase in people accessing LGBTI support services with many contacting them with anxiety over the same-sex marriage survey results.

Summary of results: Trans Pathways: the mental health experiences and care pathways of trans young people

Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, September 1, 2017

Trans Pathways is the largest study ever conducted of the mental health and care pathways of trans and gender diverse young people in Australia (859 participants). It is also the first Australian study to incorporate the views of parents and guardians of trans young people (194 participants).

What did Trans Pathways tell us?

  • Trans young people are at very high risk for poor mental health, self-harming and suicide attempts
  • Trans young people found it difficult to access health services
  • Many trans young people have experienced negative situations that affect their mental health such as peer rejection, bullying, issues with school, university or TAFE, and a lack of family support
  • Participants told us they used music and art, peers and friends, activism, social media and pets to make themselves feel better and take care of their mental wellbeing

The authors have provided a list of recommendations for governments and health providers, as well as guidance for schools, parents, peers and young trans people.

Download report:

If you or anyone you know needs help:

‘Revenge porn’: one in five report they have been victims in Australian survey

Guardian, Monday 8 May 2017

The first comprehensive research on so-called revenge porn has shed light on the “mass scale of victimisation” across Australia and its sometimes devastating impact.

A survey of nearly 4,300 people led by RMIT University and Monash University revealed that 20% of respondents had had images or videos of a nude or sexual nature taken without their consent; 11% had had them share, and 9% had received threats that images of themselves would be shared.

Men and women were equally likely to be victims but the rate was higher among younger people: one in three teenagers aged 16 to 19 and one in four aged 20 to 29 reported at least one form of image victimisation. Marginalised groups – Indigenous and gay, lesbian and bisexual Australians, and those with a disability – were especially vulnerable.

 

Gender inequality is a problem, say 69% of young Australian women

The Guardian, Tuesday 11 October 2016

Like a recent report from the UK, a new report has found young Australian women also believe sexism to be preventing them from fulfilling their potential.

Plan International Australia and Our Watch surveyed 600 girls and young women aged between 15 and 19 on their inexperiences of inequality between December 2015 and February 2016.

Girls’ & Young Womens’ Attitudes Survey

Girlguiding, 2016

The Girlguiding charity has been asking girls what they think every year since 2009 through our Girls’ Attitudes Survey. They collect the views of over 1,600 girls and young women aged 7 to 21 across the UK. 

This year girls and young women reported that they feel held back by gender stereotypes, sexism, and anxiety about how they look. They think they may not achieve their aspirations because they don’t feel safe, they’re facing double standards on what behaviour is acceptable because they’re girls and they don’t feel the same roles are open to them compared to boys.

Themes of the report:

Girls and young women spoke about the challenges they’re facing and what they want to change in relation to:

Download full report here