Gender Sexuality and Faith toolkit

Sexuality, Poverty and Law Programme, Institute of Development Studies, 2016

The Gender, Sexuality and Faith toolkit has been developed with individuals, communities and leaders practising faith. It is a user-friendly, free and interactive resource that seeks to support faith communities and leaders working to promote social justice in relation to gender and sexuality. The toolkit includes resources on:

  • Terminology
  • Key issues
  • Case studies
  • Activities

These resources have been designed for use with faith-based groups, including those of mixed faith, and they are included alongside a wide range of further resources and information produced by others, that people may find useful.

Access toolkit here

 

 

Stepping Out: free workshops at SAMESH (for young same-sex attracted men)

SAMESH, March 2016

SAMESH is running its first Stepping Out workshop for 2016.

Working in partnership with the team at MOSAIC services, this FREE workshop provides a space for same sex attracted men, 18 – 26 to gather and talk about sexuality, sex and sexual health.

Workshops will run once a week for 6 weeks, commencing April 26. (Numbers limited to 12 participants).

Workshops will run between 6.00pm – 9.00pm, and provide an opportunity to discuss a variety of topics in a safe environment, including:

  • Self Esteem & Stereotypes
  • Lifestyle & Community
  • Relationships
  • HIV & STIs
  • Coming Out
  • Sex & Pleasure

Free dinner is provided for all participants.

Should you have any questions at all regarding these resources or the workshops, feel free to contact Matt Davies on 7099 5311 or Emma Williams on 0421 103 319.

You can also find more information at the SAMESH website www.samesh.org.au where individuals can also register their interest.

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New teaching resource: Practical Guide To Love, Sex And Relationships

The Age, February 18, 2016 – 1:17AM

Did the word “pleasure” ever crop up in your sex education class at school? Chances are that, between ripping condoms off bananas and examining the vast array of sexually transmitted diseases, the notion that sex could be pleasurable, didn’t exactly leap to mind.

But a new, progressive, sex education resource for secondary students, created by the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society at La Trobe University, is aimed at reshaping the way that sex, gender, and relationships will be discussed in Australian schools.

Why Reproductive Health Can Be A Special Struggle For Women With Disabilities

ThinkProgress, Oct 1, 2015 11:14am

For many women, getting a pap smear or a birth control prescription at a doctor’s office is relatively effortless. Perhaps a little uncomfortable, yes, but only temporarily — with important, beneficial results. However, not all women in need of reproductive health care find themselves able to be accommodated in a standard doctor’s office.

Women with disabilities are far less likely to make essential appointments regarding their reproductive health due to the physical and emotional hurdles they encounter in a typical clinic. From inaccessible exam tables to assumptions that disabled women are not sexually active, barriers in the medical field can leave women discouraged and uneducated about their own health.

The downloadable guide is meant specifically for women in the Chicago area — but only because it rates local hospitals and clinics for their accessibility. The rest covers more universal issues, including a patient’s accommodation rights and general information on sexually transmitted infections. A portion of the guide also specifically focuses on empowering women to stand up for themselves.

  • Read more here
  • Download Take Charge: Reproductive Health Guide (PDF) here

Sex and disability: breaking the taboo

Stats and research on young people’s sexual health

YEP Project, November 22, 2014

The following reports and articles can be really useful when you’re looking for facts about sexual health [and young people]. They can also be useful when you’re looking for data to justify allocating funds and resources to your sexual health programs, or can be used as resources when planning sexual health education programs.

Read more here