Trans health and the risks of inappropriate curiosity

BMJ, September 9, 2019

Care providers need to be aware of the damage of inappropriate curiosity when working with people who are transgender, say Adam Shepherd, Benjamin Hanckel, and Andy Guise.

Encountering inappropriate curiosity is a common experience among people who identify as LGBT. This kind of behaviour shouldn’t happen in a healthcare facility, yet recent reports from Stonewall and the government’s Equalities Office confirm that this is a problem in healthcare and that it particularly affects people who are transgender.

What do we mean when we say that a healthcare provider is showing “inappropriate curiosity?” Researchers provided insight into what this is in a study where they describe trans participants being asked intrusive questions about their personal lives and being subjected to invasive physical examinations. Participants felt that these were irrelevant to why they had sought out medical care, and that their only purpose was to satisfy the personal interest of the healthcare practitioner. Imagine, for example, going to your GP for a chronic cough and being asked what genitals you have, or going for a foot X-ray and the radiographer making comments about your breasts.

Hepatitis C Virus – for GPs, Nurses and Allied Health Professionals

Sonder, October 2018

In this education session, presenters Dr Dep Huynh, Ms Margery Milner and Mr Jeff Stewart will provide attendees with an update on the risk factors associated with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and the management options available.

The presenters will also provide information on liver cirrhosis tests and how to choose and initiate the most appropriate HCV treatment for patients.

Learning objectives

  • Identify and understand the risk factors for HCV screening;
  • Perform correct diagnosis of chronic HCV using reflexive testing;
  • Assess and manage patients for liver cirrhosis using non-invasive tests;
  • Improve patient safety by choosing the most appropriate HCV treatment according to the patient’s characteristics and co-medications;
  • Discuss and improve your understanding on how to initiate HCV treatment.

Presented by

Dr Dep Huynh, Gastroentrologist & Staff Specialist at Queen Elizabeth Hospital,
Clinical Lecturer, University of South Australia

Margery Milner & Jeff Stewart, Nurses at Queen Elizabeth Hospital

Agenda

6.30pm – 7.00pm Registration and dinner
7.00pm – 8.00pm Presentation by Dr Dep Huynh, Gastroentrologist & Staff Specialist at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Clinical Lecturer, University of South Australia8.00pm – 8.10pm Tea/coffee break
8.10pm – 9.10pm Presentation by Margery Milner & Jeff Stewart, Nurses at Queen Elizabeth Hospital
9.10pm – 9.30pm Questions, evaluation & close

RACGP QI & CPD Category 2, 4 Points

DATE AND TIME

Mon. 5 November 2018

6:15 pm – 9:30 pm ACDT

LOCATION

Arya Restaurant

30/81 O’Connell Street

North Adelaide, SA 5006

This program is funded by the Adelaide Primary Health Network - an Australian Government initiative