STI/BBV testing tool for asymptomatic people

NSW STI Programs Unit, ASHM & Qld. Govt.,  2019

This resource has charts and information about how routine STI/BBV testing can be offered, who to, and how to follow up.

Developed by NSW STI Programs Unit, NSW Australia, and reproduced with permission by the Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service, ASHM and Communicable Diseases Branch.

 

 

Increased screening for syphilis and HIV in SA – new advice for clinicians (video)

SHINE SA,  

SHINE SA have released a short video resource for health professionals providing advice on the current syphilis outbreak in South Australia.

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection (STI). It presents a serious public health issue as it causes harm to the developing foetus and increases the transmission and acquisition of HIV.

The 5 minute video SA Syphilis Outbreak – Advice for Clinicians urges health professionals to be aware that syphilis is increasing rapidly in SA and that there is a need to respond with increased screening.

Newly available: WHO HIV PrEP Implementation Tool Mobile App

World Health Organization, August 1, 2018

The WHO PrEP Implementation Tool App for Health Workers App is now available.

On-the-go access to the following modules from the WHO PrEP Implementation Tool:

  • Clinical: for clinicians, including physicians, nurses and clinical officers
  • Counsellors: for staff who counsel people as they consider or start taking PrEP, and support them in coping with side effects and adherence strategies
  • Pharmacists: for pharmacists and people working in pharmacies; to provide information on the medicines used in PrEP as well as storage conditions
  • Testing providers: for people who provide testing services at PrEP sites and laboratories
  • PrEP users: for people taking PrEP and people interested in taking PrEP to reduce their risk of acquiring HIV; to support them in their choice and use of PrEP.

For more information and to download app, click here 

You can also visit these two websites:

‘People are scared’: the fight against a deadly virus no one has heard of

Guardian Australia, Tue 24 Apr 2018 

An Aboriginal woman – we’ll call her B – is sitting in a dry creek bed outside her community and telling the world “this is a very bad disease. But we have to talk in a way not to shame people. Not telling them straight out. Telling them gently and quietly.”

B is talking about a sickness that has killed her family member and is a potential tragedy facing Aboriginal communities in central Australia, who have the world’s highest rates of a fatal, human immune virus for which there is no current cure, no treatment and no coordinated public health response.

Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is transmitted through sexual contact, blood transfusion and from mother to child by breastfeeding. It can cause a rapidly fatal form of leukaemia. Some people die within weeks of diagnosis. HTLV-1 also causes inflammation of the spinal cord leading to paralysis, severe lung disease known as bronchiectasis and other inflammatory disease.

In five communities around Alice Springs, more than 45% of adults tested have the virus, a rate thousands of times higher than for non-Indigenous Australians.

Public health and HIV viral load suppression

UNAIDS, 19 JULY 2017

Key messages:

1. There is growing scientific consensus that people living with HIV who are taking effective antiretroviral therapy and whose virus is suppressed to undetectable levels will not transmit HIV sexually.

2. Treatment is first and foremost about enabling the person living with HIV to regain and maintain good health. Globally, there needs to be better access to viral load assays at affordable prices, combined with effective laboratory systems and robust health services. Stronger efforts should be in place to ensure that all people living with HIV have access to treatment as soon as they are diagnosed.

3. The Positive Health, Dignity and Prevention10 framework of the Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+) and UNAIDS lays out important principles for involving people living with HIV and ensuring that everyone is responsible for prevention, irrespective of their HIV status. The framework calls for ending stigma, discrimination and unjust criminalisation that violate human rights and deter people living from HIV from accessing HIV prevention, treatment and care services.

4. The UNAIDS Fast-Track approach and the 2016 United Nations Political Declaration on Ending AIDS lay out recommendations that address the primary prevention and structural changes required to reach everyone affected and to provide accessible and affordable treatment for all people living with HIV.

5. Male and female condoms and other combination prevention strategies remain a key part of the HIV response as primary prevention tools. Stronger condom programming is essential to ensure sexual and reproductive health in general, not just HIV.

 

Increased screening for syphilis boosts detection of early latent infections among Australian gay men

nam/aidsmap,  Published: 03 May 2017

Increased syphilis testing among gay men increased detection of early latent infections and was accompanied by a fall in the proportion of cases involving secondary syphilis, investigators report in the online edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

  • Read more here 
  • Access article abstract here (for full text, see your librarian)