Webinar: Syphilis Outbreak in the Indigenous Community

SHINE SA, posted May 14, 2020

This free education session is presented by Adelaide Sexual Health Centre and will provide an update on syphilis.

General practitioners, nurses and/or midwives, Aboriginal Health Practitioners and Aboriginal Health Workers are encouraged to register for this training.

COURSE DETAILS

Date: 16 June 2020
Time: 7:00pm – 9:00pm

The webinar will cover:

  • Update on epidemiology
  • Review of diagnosis, staging and management of syphilis cases
  • How to interpret syphilis serology
  • Syphilis in pregnancy
  • Approaches to Partner Notification
  • Introduction to the South Australian Syphilis Register

Presenters:
Dr Alison Ward, Senior Consultant Sexual Health Physician
Njirrah Rowe, Aboriginal STI Education Coordinator and Partner Notification Officer

This activity is pending RACGP approval for 4 CPD activity points

This session is part of the Syphilis Outbreak Response and is a partnership between SHINE SA and Adelaide Sexual Health Centre.

No cost to attend.

Internet-based self-sampling for Chlamydia trachomatis testing

Söderqvist JGullsby KStark L, et al
Internet-based self-sampling for Chlamydia trachomatis testing: a national evaluation in Sweden

Abstract:

Objective Internet-based testing for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) with self-sampling at home has gradually been implemented in Sweden since 2006 as a free-of-charge service within the public healthcare system. This study evaluated the national diagnostic outcome of this service.

Methods Requests for data on both self-sampling at home and clinic-based sampling for CT testing were sent to the laboratories in 18 of 21 counties. Four laboratories were also asked to provide data on testing patterns at the individual level for the years 2013–2017.

Results The proportion of self-sampling increased gradually from 2013, comprising 22.0% of all CT tests in Sweden in 2017. In an analysis of 14 counties (representing 83% of the population), self-sampling increased by 115% between 2013 and 2017 for women, compared with 71% for men, while test volumes for clinic-based sampling were fairly constant for both sexes (1.8% increase for women, 15% increase for men). In 2017 self-sampling accounted for 20.3% of all detected CT cases, and the detection rate was higher than, but similar to, clinic-based testing (5.5% vs 5.1%). The proportion of self-sampling men was also higher, but similar (33.7% vs 30.8%). Analysis of individual testing patterns in four counties over 5 years showed a higher proportion of men using self-sampling only (67%, n=10 533) compared with women (40%, n=8885).

Conclusions Self-sampling has increased substantially in recent years, especially among women. This service is at least as beneficial as clinic-based screening for detection of CT, and self-sampling reaches men more than clinic-based testing.

STI/BBV testing tool for asymptomatic people

NSW STI Programs Unit, ASHM & Qld. Govt.,  2019

This resource has charts and information about how routine STI/BBV testing can be offered, who to, and how to follow up.

Developed by NSW STI Programs Unit, NSW Australia, and reproduced with permission by the Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service, ASHM and Communicable Diseases Branch.

 

 

Increased screening for syphilis and HIV in SA – new advice for clinicians (video)

SHINE SA,  

SHINE SA have released a short video resource for health professionals providing advice on the current syphilis outbreak in South Australia.

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection (STI). It presents a serious public health issue as it causes harm to the developing foetus and increases the transmission and acquisition of HIV.

The 5 minute video SA Syphilis Outbreak – Advice for Clinicians urges health professionals to be aware that syphilis is increasing rapidly in SA and that there is a need to respond with increased screening.

Newly available: WHO HIV PrEP Implementation Tool Mobile App

World Health Organization, August 1, 2018

The WHO PrEP Implementation Tool App for Health Workers App is now available.

On-the-go access to the following modules from the WHO PrEP Implementation Tool:

  • Clinical: for clinicians, including physicians, nurses and clinical officers
  • Counsellors: for staff who counsel people as they consider or start taking PrEP, and support them in coping with side effects and adherence strategies
  • Pharmacists: for pharmacists and people working in pharmacies; to provide information on the medicines used in PrEP as well as storage conditions
  • Testing providers: for people who provide testing services at PrEP sites and laboratories
  • PrEP users: for people taking PrEP and people interested in taking PrEP to reduce their risk of acquiring HIV; to support them in their choice and use of PrEP.

For more information and to download app, click here 

You can also visit these two websites:

‘People are scared’: the fight against a deadly virus no one has heard of

Guardian Australia, Tue 24 Apr 2018 

An Aboriginal woman – we’ll call her B – is sitting in a dry creek bed outside her community and telling the world “this is a very bad disease. But we have to talk in a way not to shame people. Not telling them straight out. Telling them gently and quietly.”

B is talking about a sickness that has killed her family member and is a potential tragedy facing Aboriginal communities in central Australia, who have the world’s highest rates of a fatal, human immune virus for which there is no current cure, no treatment and no coordinated public health response.

Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is transmitted through sexual contact, blood transfusion and from mother to child by breastfeeding. It can cause a rapidly fatal form of leukaemia. Some people die within weeks of diagnosis. HTLV-1 also causes inflammation of the spinal cord leading to paralysis, severe lung disease known as bronchiectasis and other inflammatory disease.

In five communities around Alice Springs, more than 45% of adults tested have the virus, a rate thousands of times higher than for non-Indigenous Australians.