Women taking pill may be less likely to suffer ACL injury, study finds

The Guardian,

Women and Sexual and Reproductive Health Position Paper: Second Edition, 2019

Australian Women’s Health Network Inc., 2019

The Australian Women’s Health Network first published its Women and Sexual and Reproductive Health Position Paper in 2012. Since then significant work has been undertaken across Australia in this area and a number of its recommendations have been implemented. This has resulted in a robust on going public conversation and a greater understanding of women’s sexual and reproductive ill health, its impact, what drives it and how best to prevent it. These gains have only been possible through continuing evidence-informed advocacy, research and practice development.

In light of the new knowledge and experience available, and changes to the political, organisational and social landscape in 2019, the Australian Women’s Health Network has updated its Women and Sexual and Reproductive Health paper to produce
this Second Edition.

This paper advocates for a rights-based approach to ensuring all women can access comprehensive sexual and reproductive health care appropriate to their needs,
regardless of their location, age, sexuality, financial status and religious and cultural background. It explores seven key areas through which good sexual and reproductive
health for Australian women can be achieved.

These are:

1. promoting positive and respectful attitudes to sex and sexuality

2. developing women’s health literacy

3. increasing reproductive choice

4. facilitating women’s health throughout pregnancy and birth

5. expanding prevention and treatment of reproductive cancers and menstrual issues

6. improving prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted infections (STIs)

7. equipping the health workforce to better respond to women’s health needs.

New free MOOC from Adelaide Uni: Sex and Human Reproduction

University of Adelaide, June 2018

AdelaideX’s Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) offer learners free to study university-level online courses on a variety of topics.  AdelaideX’s latest MOOC, Sex and Human Reproduction, will launch on Thursday 12 July and enrolments are now open. 

Led by Professor Mario Ricci (Adelaide Medical School), and made in collaboration with experts from the Robinson Research Institute, this five-week course will cover all things related to sex and reproduction – from puberty to menopause, to fertility and contraception. The course focuses on underlying human biology, common myths, and the latest medical advances.

What you’ll learn

  • Structure and function of the male and female reproductive systems
  • Regulation of reproductive processes and cycles
  • Common reproductive disorders
  • Methods of contraception and assisted reproduction
  • Real world application of cutting-edge research in reproductive medicine

This MOOC is free (with a $50 fee for a verified certificate if desired).

 

 

Rise of contraceptive apps sparks fears over unwanted pregnancies

Guardian, 

New sexual health videos in English, Arabic, Karen and Punjab

Health Translations Directory (Victorian Government of Australia), February  2018
Health Translations Directory has now added some new audiovisual files in English, Arabic, Karen and Punjab, developed by Family Planning Victoria. These are part of a series of videos about periods, pregnancy and contraception, for newly arrived migrant and refugee women in Australia.

The videos provide general information.lease speak to a health professional for appropriate individual advice.

(Note: These links may not work in all browsers – Internet explorer/Edge recommended)

 

Sex drive: Understanding why low libido is a common problem in middle-aged women

While it’s hard to know exactly how many women experience low libido, it seems it might be more common than previously thought.

Almost 70 per cent of Australian women aged 40-65 years old reported a lack of sexual desire in a recent study published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

The authors noted this was “somewhat higher” than estimates from previous studies, which used different survey methods.