Leadership Training Academy 2018 is coming

The Equality Project Australia, August 2018

In order to achieve meaningful social change we need to foster the training of a new generation of LGBTIQ+ advocates to lead the conversation, reshape the narrative, and ultimately, change the culture.

The Equality Project’s Leadership Training Academy (#LTA2018) is a specialised leadership and media engagement training program for LGBTIQ+ change-makers and emerging community leaders who want to build the core skills and techniques to effect positive social change.

They have compiled an exciting curriculum that includes programs from some of the largest LGBTIQ+ rights organisations in the world. These include the world-class GLAAD Media Institute and the Stonewall LGBTIQ Role Models program.

The Leadership Training Academy is designed for LGBTIQ+ advocates and emerging community leaders as well as professionals from any sector or industry who want to explore what it means to be an authentic and inclusive LGBTIQ+ role model in the workplace.

They are looking for a diverse range of participants particularly those who are from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, people of faith, people with a disability, women and non-binary people – and those at the intersections of these identities.

With the support of sponsors and training partners, the two 2-day leadership training program is one of the most affordable in the country. But if you are unable to attend due to cost they encourage you to apply for a scholarship.

Morning tea, afternoon tea and lunch included on both days.

The Leadership Training Academy will be held in October 2018 in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Adelaide, Perth and Canberra.

 

Media coverage of methamphetamine use in SA “demonising”

InDaily Adelaide, August 1, 2018

The head of South Australia’s drug and alcohol services network says recent reports on the use of methamphetamine in the workplace are misleading and could cause people to turn away from seeking treatment.

 

Surgeon Who Was Denied Disability Insurance for Taking PrEP Tells His Story

Earlier this year, urology resident Dr. Philip Cheng appeared on the front page of the New York Times. Here was the headline: He Took a Drug to Prevent AIDS. Then He Couldn’t Get Disability Insurance.

The piece understandably drew widespread attention, with sharp disapproval of the denial from ID specialists and public health officials. We couldn’t understand why someone adopting the recommended strategy for HIV prevention was being penalized.

In this Open Forum Infectious Diseases podcast, he tells us some more about himself and the events surrounding his decision.

Media release from SHINE SA: Teen Pregnancy

SHINE SA, Issued: 25 May 2018

Following the release of the Australian Institute of Health and Wellbeing’s Report, that includes the latest figures on teen birth-rates, SHINE SA believes that a decrease in the teen birth-rate as indicated in the report, is a positive outcome from the study.

“A decrease may reflect better sexual health information for young people including education in schools, and better access to sexual health services”, said Dr Amy Moten, Coordinator, Medical Education at SHINE SA.

“Increased access to Long Acting reversible Contraception for young people, as promoted by Family Planning Alliance Australia, is also a significant factor in reducing teen pregnancy rates”, Dr Moten said.

Low socio-economic status can be a marker of poor health outcomes overall. This increases with remoteness from metropolitan areas and Indigenous status. This has been shown in previous studies and also is supported by national data regarding cervical screening that shows that low socio-economic and Indigenous status reduces the rate of screening compared to people from a higher socioeconomic areas.

Social determinants of health are linked to social and economic factors that influence health. Young people from a lower socioeconomic area are likely to have poorer health literacy, lower levels of education and poorer access to health services including contraception. These have all been shown to be linked to an increased birth rate over all ages. Barriers to access health and contraceptive services such as cost and availability of these services increase with distance from metropolitan areas.

“Generally, teen mums often face increased stigma about being a parent and should be supported in their decision to continue parenting”, Dr Moten said.

“At SHINE SA, we provide pregnancy testing, counselling and advice. When a young person is pregnant they can discuss their options and be referred to appropriate services. For a young person continuing to parent we would refer them to the Metropolitan Youth Health Service for example, which has a Young Parenting program”, Dr Moten said.

SHINE SA believes that young mums should be supported to continue their education as completing secondary school after pregnancy has been shown to improve long term outcomes in both mother and child.

Dr Amy Moten, Coordinator Medical Education, SHINE SA
Issued: 25 May 2018

 

Some women feel grief after an abortion, but there’s no evidence of serious mental health issues

The Conversation, April 26, 2018 12.36pm AEST

This week, the website Mamamia published, and then quickly removed, an article about the existence of “post-abortion syndrome” – a disorder apparently experienced by many women who have had an abortion. The article claimed this disorder has been concealed from the public and that the trauma of an induced abortion can be comparable to the experience of child sexual abuse or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) suffered by war veterans.

Neither the term “post-abortion syndrome”, nor the claims about its characteristics, are supported by any national or international psychological societies. Of course, many women experience emotional responses to an abortion, which are normal reactions to a significant event.

 

 

Substance misuse – the gender divide explained

Alcohol and Drug Foundation, February 21, 2018

Men generally consume harmful substances at higher rates than women – this is true both within Australia and internationally. But while the research points to the prevalence of substance misuse disorders among women in Australia as being around half that of men, they are more likely to be socially criticised as a result of their use/misuse.

This criticism stems from the continuation of traditional gender-based roles assigned to women within our society, which in turn generates and perpetuates social and institutional stigma. One of the end results of this is a reduction in women seeking out treatment services for alcohol and other drug-related (AOD) issues. Which, in turn, has reduced the opportunity for research into many of the gender-specific factors that drive women’s AOD misuse, as well as reducing the quality and efficacy of AOD treatment services for them.