Healthcare failing transgender people

La Trobe University, 10/10/2019

Some trans and gender diverse patients would rather die than face ignorance and discrimination previously experienced in health care settings, according to La Trobe University research.

La Trobe PhD student Lucille Kerr surveyed 537 trans and gender diverse people from across Australia, asking detailed questions about their experiences in the Australian health system.

“We’ve found people being refused care, experiencing significant mistreatment, and having to educate their own doctors,” Ms Kerr said.

“Although some reported having found understanding, well-informed doctors, most of our findings are concerning, with some deeply worrying. We urgently need widespread training and education within the healthcare system.”

 

 

Report: 6th National Survey of Australian Secondary Students and Sexual Health

Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (ARCSHS), 2019

The Secondary Students and Adolescent Sexual Health survey is a national study exploring the sexual health and well-being of Australian adolescents. The anonymous survey asks questions about knowledge, behaviour and educational experiences related to sexual health and well-being.

The Commonwealth Department of Health funded study has been conducted approximately every 5 years since 1992. This is the 6th time the survey has been conducted in Australia. Results play a vital role in safeguarding the nation’s health by informing the national strategies to prevent HIV, sexually transmissible infections and blood-borne viruses as well as providing valuable information to improve service provision and education across multiple sectors.

Largest national study exploring the health and wellbeing of young LGBTIQ people

Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health & Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, 2019

This is Me is the largest national study exploring the health and wellbeing of LGBTIQ young people in Australia. Conducted by the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health & Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, this short (8-10 minute) survey asks young people a range of questions about health and wellbeing as well as who young people go to for help and support if they need it.

This is Me is the fourth study of its kind. ARCSHS has previously conducted versions of this study in 1998, 2004 and 2010, as well as a study specifically about the health and wellbeing of transgender and gender diverse young people in 2014. These studies documented high levels of harm, and examined the impact that such stigma and discrimination had on the health and wellbeing of LGBTIQ+ young people, as well as seeking to better understand who LGBTIQ+ young people turned to when in need.

The data collected from This is Me will provide important insight into the present-day lives and experiences of LGBTIQ young people. The responses young people give will help us to understand what can support LGBTIQ young people to thrive.

Evidence from the study will enable organisations, services and government to make informed decisions about how to best support the health and wellbeing of LGBTIQ young people. Findings from the study will inform the development of LGBTIQ-inclusive mainstream, and LGBTIQ-specific, youth policies, programs and services.

 

  • Please do not promote the survey via Twitter – this platform is deliberately not part of the promotion strategy.

 

  • You can let young people know the supports available to them if filling out the survey triggers any strong feelings and they want to chat about it. If you offer counselling or support, let them know. Remind young people of support options such as Qlife, headspace or Reachout. Kids Helpline on 1800 55 1800 or atkidshelpline.com.au or Lifeline on 13 11 14 or at lifeline.org.au 24 hours/day 7 days per week.

 

  • Read the FAQ here FAQs

 

 

Secondary students’ sexual health survey results

La Trobe University, 11th June 2019

The sixth National Survey of Australian Secondary Students and Sexual Health, conducted in 2018 and released today, found 47 per cent of Year 10-12 students taking the survey had engaged in sexual intercourse.  Of sexually active respondents, 76 per cent had sex at home; 65 per cent with a boyfriend or girlfriend; 62 percent often or always used a condom; and 86 per cent with somebody about the same age.

Lead researcher at La Trobe University’s Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society Dr Christopher Fisher said the survey asked 6327 Year 10-12 students in Government, Catholic and Independent schools from each state and territory, about their sexual behaviour and knowledge of sexually transmitted infections.

“Overall, young Australians have good knowledge of sexual health, are behaving responsibly and are actively seeking out trusted, reliable sources of information,” Dr Fisher said.

Responding to LGBT conversion therapy in Australia: report

GLHV@ARCSHS, La Trobe University & Human Rights Law Centre, 2018

This report highlights the nature, extent and impact of LGBT conversion therapies in Australia.

The report is designed to help government, support services and faith communities to better respond to those experiencing conflict between their gender identity or sexual orientation and their beliefs.

The everyday experiences of LGBTI people living with disability

GLHV@ARCSHS, La Trobe University,  July 2018

This report documents the effects of systemic discrimination on the health and wellbeing of LGBTI people with disability.

It is divided into two key sections. The first reviews the national and international research and policy literatures on the impacts of systemic discrimination, disadvantage and social exclusion on the health and wellbeing of LGBTI people with disability and their access to services.

The second, smaller section presents preliminary analyses of unpublished data on LGBT people with disability from Private lives 2: The second national survey of the health and wellbeing of LGBT Australians (2012).

KEY FINDINGS:

The review found that research, policy and practice on the health and wellbeing of LGBTI people with disability in Australia is fragmented, under-resourced and relies on different, sometimes contrary definitions of ‘disability’.

The review documents higher rates of discrimination and reduced service access among LGBTI people with disability compared with people with disability and LGBTI people without disability; greater restrictions on freedom of sexual expression (particularly for LGBTI people with intellectual disability); and reduced social support and connection from both LGBTI and disability communities.

It documents a lack of professional training, resources and support for disability and allied health care workers for LGBTI people with disability. It also found that many disability services and workers are unwilling to address the sexual and gender identity rights and freedoms of LGBTI people with disability.