Secondary students’ sexual health survey results

La Trobe University, 11th June 2019

The sixth National Survey of Australian Secondary Students and Sexual Health, conducted in 2018 and released today, found 47 per cent of Year 10-12 students taking the survey had engaged in sexual intercourse.  Of sexually active respondents, 76 per cent had sex at home; 65 per cent with a boyfriend or girlfriend; 62 percent often or always used a condom; and 86 per cent with somebody about the same age.

Lead researcher at La Trobe University’s Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society Dr Christopher Fisher said the survey asked 6327 Year 10-12 students in Government, Catholic and Independent schools from each state and territory, about their sexual behaviour and knowledge of sexually transmitted infections.

“Overall, young Australians have good knowledge of sexual health, are behaving responsibly and are actively seeking out trusted, reliable sources of information,” Dr Fisher said.

Responding to LGBT conversion therapy in Australia: report

GLHV@ARCSHS, La Trobe University & Human Rights Law Centre, 2018

This report highlights the nature, extent and impact of LGBT conversion therapies in Australia.

The report is designed to help government, support services and faith communities to better respond to those experiencing conflict between their gender identity or sexual orientation and their beliefs.

The everyday experiences of LGBTI people living with disability

GLHV@ARCSHS, La Trobe University,  July 2018

This report documents the effects of systemic discrimination on the health and wellbeing of LGBTI people with disability.

It is divided into two key sections. The first reviews the national and international research and policy literatures on the impacts of systemic discrimination, disadvantage and social exclusion on the health and wellbeing of LGBTI people with disability and their access to services.

The second, smaller section presents preliminary analyses of unpublished data on LGBT people with disability from Private lives 2: The second national survey of the health and wellbeing of LGBT Australians (2012).

KEY FINDINGS:

The review found that research, policy and practice on the health and wellbeing of LGBTI people with disability in Australia is fragmented, under-resourced and relies on different, sometimes contrary definitions of ‘disability’.

The review documents higher rates of discrimination and reduced service access among LGBTI people with disability compared with people with disability and LGBTI people without disability; greater restrictions on freedom of sexual expression (particularly for LGBTI people with intellectual disability); and reduced social support and connection from both LGBTI and disability communities.

It documents a lack of professional training, resources and support for disability and allied health care workers for LGBTI people with disability. It also found that many disability services and workers are unwilling to address the sexual and gender identity rights and freedoms of LGBTI people with disability.

The ‘revolutionary’ programs giving hope to LGBT domestic violence survivors

Updated 

Studies show people in same-sex relationships experience domestic violence at similar — and possibly higher — rates as opposite-sex couples.

But until recently survivors have suffered in silence and worse, been ignored and misunderstood by the health professionals and police who are supposed to help them, because of the persistent stigma and shame surrounding LGBT abuse and misconceptions that especially lesbian couples are immune from it.

Australian Sex Ed Teachers Survey

The Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health & Society La Trobe University, Oct 2017

Are you a teacher in Australia? Do you teach any aspects of sex education? If so, this is your chance to share your thoughts! Take part in this important new research from La Trobe University about the impact of the Australian Curriculum on your experiences of teaching sex education in schools.

This is the first national Australian study to focus on the implementation of national sexuality education guidelines in schools and sexuality educators’ experiences since the release of the Australian Curriculum.

You are invited to complete this survey if you are a teacher aged 18 or above who has delivered any form of sexuality education in an Australian school in the last two years. The survey takes approximately 15-20 minutes to complete.

The survey first asks some general background questions about you, such as your age and education. The survey then goes on to cover questions about your teaching experience, the current school in which you teach, your sexuality education training, and your views on and experiences teaching sexuality education in schools.

New teaching resource: Practical Guide To Love, Sex And Relationships

The Age, February 18, 2016 – 1:17AM

Did the word “pleasure” ever crop up in your sex education class at school? Chances are that, between ripping condoms off bananas and examining the vast array of sexually transmitted diseases, the notion that sex could be pleasurable, didn’t exactly leap to mind.

But a new, progressive, sex education resource for secondary students, created by the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society at La Trobe University, is aimed at reshaping the way that sex, gender, and relationships will be discussed in Australian schools.