Impact of COVID-19 on Migrant and Refugee Women and Children Experiencing DFV

Women’s Safety NSW, Published: July 31, 2020

Whilst research on the prevalence of violence against migrant and refugee women is limited, what is known is that cultural, language and systemic barriers serve to reduce access to safety and support for this group of women, and they are at higher risk of domestic homicide. (AIC 2020)

This also corresponds with lower rates of reporting amongst migrant and refugee women experiencing domestic and family violence, as distrust for authorities, limited knowledge of rights and services and concerns about both material and cultural ramifications can serve as insurmountable barriers to accessing the supports needed. (AIFS 2018)

What has not yet been investigated is the specific impact of COVID-19 on migrant and refugee women experiencing domestic and family violence. This report from Women’s Safety NSW offers the experiences and professional observations of multicultural domestic and family violence specialists supporting hundreds of these very women at this critical time. What they’ve reported is that migrant and refugee women who are experiencing domestic and family violence are at higher risk than they have ever been before and that urgent action is needed if we are going to save lives.

New service providing mental health support to people of CALD backgrounds

Relationships Australia South Australia, May 2020

ASKPEACE is available to provide mental health support to people of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds living in South Australia who have been impacted by COVID-19.

The ASK Peace Project will provide a virtual service based on counselling and case management, referrals, support and advocacy services to respond to the mental health and wellbeing of CALD individuals, families and communities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

It is not necessary to speak English to access this service.

You can refer your client to this service; they also accept self-referrals.

There is no cost for the service.

Interpreter trial ensures hospitals are no longer places where Aboriginal people ‘go to die’

ABC News, ABC Kimberley

By Matt Bamford,  

Many Aboriginal people feel like hospital is a place where they “go to die” but a groundbreaking trial is underway to change that.

Interpreters have been introduced at hospitals in Western Australia’s far north to improve patients’ relationships with medical staff.

Speaking between three and nine languages each, the 22 interpreters are being stationed at five hospitals between Broome and Kununurra in a six-month State Government partnership with Aboriginal Interpreting WA.

HIV and hepatitis pre and post test discussion in Victoria: consultation report

Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University, Nov 2017

In February 2017, the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University initiated a consultation which aimed to describe best practice in HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C pre and post test discussion in the Victorian context.

Building on existing evidence, and guided by the National Testing Policies, the purpose of this consultation was to better understand the components of a quality testing encounter in the era of elimination, with particular emphasis on the non-medical needs of people around the time of testing and diagnosis.

The focus of this consultation was to identify best practice in pre and post test discussion for HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C. A range of health and community providers and researchers discussed the fundamentals of best practice at length, and provided a great many insights into the components of quality testing services.
Importantly, most participants acknowledged that while best practice is a valuable notion, it is not attainable in all health care settings. Best practice, therefore, needs to be flexible enough to be able to fit into any setting where HIV, hepatitis B or hepatitis C testing may occur.

 

Forum: How to effectively use interpreters

SHINE SA, 18 April 2017

Our upcoming ReFRESH Forum is on how to use interpreters effectively.

Interpreters play an important role in our multicultural society, especially in their contribution to appropriate delivery of health care services. An interpreter’s role is to act as a conduit, conveying information in an understandable format between parties who do not share a common language.

Interpreters are a valuable asset when working with clients from diverse backgrounds. Ensuring that we are communicating effectively with our clients depends on how
and when we use interpreters.

This forum aims to explore and enhance the ways in which workers and services can effectively use interpreters.

When 2 June 2017
Where SHINE SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville
Time 1.30 – 3.30 pm
Cost $50 (Student Concession $45), light refreshments included.

 

Training for accredited, unaccredited or aspiring interpreters of African background (free)

Relationships Australia, Monday, 1 February 2016

Free Training For African Communities

PEACE Multicultural Services of Relationships Australia SA is offering a learning opportunity for accredited, unaccredited or aspiring interpreters of African background.

This program will provide an opportunity for individuals to develop and enhance their interpreting skills, improve their knowledge base on appropriate health terminologies and learn how to promote meaningful practice in working within the blood borne virus sector.

Lunch will be provided and Certificates will be awarded upon completion of this training.
Places are limited and registration is essential.

Dates: Saturdays, 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30 April 2016
Time: 11.00am – 3.30pm
Venue: Relationships Australia SA
49a Orsmond Street, Hindmarsh 5007

For further information or to register for this program, please contact Laura Adzanku on 8245 8133 or on email Laura l.adzanku@rasa.org.au

Download flyer below InterpreterTraining