Child Living with HIV Maintains Remission Without Drugs Since 2008

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), July 24, 2017

A nine-year-old South African child who was diagnosed with HIV infection at one month of age and received anti-HIV treatment during infancy has suppressed the virus without anti-HIV drugs for eight and a half years, scientists reported today at the 9th IAS Conference on HIV Science in Paris. This case appears to be the third reported instance of sustained HIV remission in a child after early, limited anti-HIV treatment.

Syphilis Outbreak in Northern South Australia

SA Health, Communicable Disease Control Branch (CDCB),15/5/17

The Communicable Disease Control Branch (CDCB) has been closely monitoring infectious syphilis notifications in South Australia in light of a multi-jurisdictional outbreak of syphilis occurring across northern Australia. It appears that this outbreak has spread to South Australia, with sustained transmission occurring in Port Augusta, and there is the potential for spread to other regions of South Australia.

 

Young Parents’ Fight To Keep Baby Aria Reignites Debate Over Teenage Parents

The Conversation, 19/04/2017 10:04 AM AEST | Updated 20/04/2017 10:53 AM AEST

Two New South Wales teenagers’ fight to get their baby daughter back has reignited debate over teenage pregnancy, and how young is too young to care for a child.

While experts may agree that teen pregnancies are less than ideal, there is disagreement about what should happen in the case of the young couple — some saying authorities made the right decision, while others argue that Jayden and Jenifer should have been supported in caring for their daughter.

Decision-making about infant feeding among African women living with HIV in the UK

“It pains me because as a woman you have to breastfeed your baby”: decision-making about infant feeding among African women living with HIV in the UK

Sex Transm Infect 2016;92:331-336 doi:10.1136/sextrans-2015-052224

Abstract

Objectives UK guidance advises HIV-positive women to abstain from breast feeding. Although this eliminates the risk of postnatal vertical transmission of HIV, the impact of replacement feeding on mothers is often overlooked. This qualitative study examines, for the first time in the UK, decision-making about infant feeding among African women living with HIV.

Methods Between 2010 and 2011, we conducted semistructured interviews with 23 HIV-positive African women who were pregnant or had recently given birth. We recruited participants from three HIV antenatal clinics in London.

Results Women highlighted the cultural importance of breast feeding in African communities and the social pressure to breast feed, also describing fears that replacement feeding would signify their HIV status. Participants had significant concerns about physical and psychological effects of replacement feeding on their child and felt their identity as good mothers was compromised by not breast feeding. However, almost all chose to refrain from breast feeding, driven by the desire to minimise vertical transmission risk. Participants’ resilience was strengthened by financial assistance with replacement feeding, examples of healthy formula-fed children and support from partners, family, peers and professionals.

Conclusions The decision to avoid breast feeding came at considerable emotional cost to participants. Professionals should be aware of the difficulties encountered by HIV-positive women in refraining from breast feeding, especially those from migrant African communities where breast feeding is culturally normative. Appropriate financial and emotional support increases women’s capacity to adhere to their infant-feeding decisions and may reduce the emotional impact.

Read article (open access) here

 

Boy, girl or …? Dilemmas when sexual development is atypical

The Conversation, March 11, 2016 6.19am AEDT

Some babies are born with a genetic variant that leads to atypical sexual development. It can result in the child being neither a typical boy nor girl.

Estimates of this occurring range from one in 1,500 or 2,000 births, to 4% of all births, depending on what definitions are used.

Read more here

Should Doctors Operate On Intersex Babies?

Buzzfeed,

M.C. was born with ambiguous genitalia, a rare condition that doctors addressed with surgery. Now, in a landmark lawsuit, M.C.’s parents are challenging the medical mainstream: Why does a surgeon decide what sex a child should be?

Read more here