Decriminalisation of sex work in south Australia (SHINE SA Media Release)

SHINE SA,  

On 31 May 2019, the Sex Industry Network (SIN) will gather at Parliament House to rally for the decriminalisation of the South Australian sex industry and to recognise International Sex Workers Day.

In South Australia sex work is criminalised, prohibiting sex work so that those engaging in relevant activities can be prosecuted for criminal offences. SIN and Scarlet Alliance (Australian Sex Workers Association) advocate for decriminalisation which is seen as a best practice model by sex workers and community-based organisations.

In a recent statement SIN said:

“Sex work is skilled labour. We deserve the same industrial protections as any other worker in South Australia and, currently, what sets us apart is the criminalisation of the industry within which we CHOOSE to work.”

Natasha Miliotis, Chief Executive of SHINE SA said:

“We support the work of SIN and their advocacy for the decriminalisation of sex work in SA.

Amnesty International, the United Nations and the World Health Organization have all called for the full decriminalisation of consensual sex work as the scientific evidence is now clear – criminalisation itself leads to harm¹.

From a public health perspective decriminalisation is important to not only reduce stigma and discrimination, but to improve the health and safety of workers, clients and the broader community².”

For more information on SIN’s celebration of International Sex Workers Day and the rally for the decriminalisation of the South Australian sex industry visit www.sin.org.au.

For further information contact Tracey Hutt, Director Workforce Education and Development via email  or via telephone on 0434 937 036

 

 

¹ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30532209

² https://theconversation.com/new-report-shows-compelling-reasons-to-decriminalise-sex-work-83955

Evaluating the cost-effectiveness of existing needle and syringe programmes in preventing hepatitis C transmission in PWID

Drug and Alcohol Findings (UK), 2019

What would happen to rates of infection with hepatitis C if we closed down all the needle exchanges? Research has established that needle/syringe programmes are a cost-effective way to reduce spread of HIV, but just two studies have considered the same issue in relation to hepatitis C.

In three UK municipalities, the answers were predicted to be more infections, lost low-cost opportunities to improve and save lives, and in two of the areas, greater health-related costs overall. Conclusion was that these services are among the best investments UK health services can make.

Upcoming forum – Call me by any name: the facts on meth and Hep A, B and C

SAMESH & Hepatitis SA, August 2018

Crystal? Ice? Tina? Have questions about methamphetamines?

Want to know the facts? How to look after yourself and others?

Curious about hepatitis A, B or C? Want to know more about transmission and treatment?

Come to our community forum & have your questions answered by experts.

Speakers: Gary Spence & Michelle Spudic – from Hepatitis SA

FREE EVENT

Date: 30 August 2018
Time: 6.30 PM – 8 PM
Location: SAMESH, 57 Hyde Street Adelaide

RSVP Register at samesh-enquiries@samesh.org.au
or call (08) 7099 5300

Download flyer here: CMBAN_Poster

Scotland’s reduction in new HCV infections is due to harm reduction, not treatment

infohep, Published:12 June 2018

The reduction in new hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections that has taken place in Scotland since 2008 is most likely due to increased provision of needle and syringe programmes and opioid substitution therapy, rather than a reduction in the number of people with hepatitis C as a result of increased treatment of HCV infection, a modelling study published in the journal Addiction reports.

Researchers from the University of Bristol and three Scottish universities developed a model of the Scottish HCV epidemic to test the impact of varying levels of harm reduction provision.

Melbourne’s first safe injecting room, clean, sterile and ‘will save lives’

ABC News, 29.6.18

Up to 300 people a day are expected to use Victoria’s first medically supervised drug injecting room when it opens in the coming days.

The Victorian Government committed to a two-year trial at the North Richmond Community Health Centre, after three separate coroners called for a supervised space.

Mental Health Minister Martin Foley said it would save lives.

AoD and harm minimisation with Gender and Sexually Diverse (GSD) people

Mental Health Professionals’ Network, January 2018

You are invited to the next Adelaide Gender and Sexually Diverse (GSD) Mental Health network meeting:

AoD and harm minimisation

Featuring expert guest speakers from the AOD sector

Thursday, 8 February 2018

10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Glenside Hospital Learning Centre, 226 Fullarton Rd, Glenside

Light refreshments will be provided. RSVP essential.