Can diet improve the symptoms of endometriosis?

The Conversation, February 19, 2018 6.14am AEDT

By Elisabeth Gasparini, Manager of Nutrition and Food Services, The Royal Women’s Hospital

Current treatments for endometriosis, such as surgery and contraceptive pills, can be invasive or cause unpleasant side effects. So, the internet is awash with advice for alternative treatments, including acupuncture and dietary changes. Some women claim to have reduced their symptoms by eating “anti-inflammatory” foods, cutting out gluten, dairy and alcohol.

But what is the evidence behind eating or avoiding certain foods, and should women with endometriosis adhere to a specific diet?

New standards of care for trans and gender diverse children and adolescents

The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne, 2017

The first Australian Standards of Care and Treatment Guidelines for trans and gender diverse children and adolescents, led Led by the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne, have been released.

Dr Michelle Telfer, Head of Adolescent Medicine and Gender Services at the RCH, says health professionals, such as GPs, school counsellors and psychologists, from around the country often seek information from the RCH but until now only international guidelines had been available.

“With 1.2% of adolescents identifying as transgender, and referrals and requests for specialist support on the rise, there is definitely a need for Australia to have its own guidelines. Trans-medicine is a relatively new area of medical practise, and most doctors didn’t get taught how to manage the care of trans children and adolescents in medical school or in their later specialist training. These guidelines, developed by leaders in this field, will help to fill this knowledge gap,” she says.

The guidelines were developed using current evidence and the input of more than 50 specialists, and they have the endorsement of the Australian and New Zealand Professional Association for Transgender Health.

The guidelines include terminology, information about the unique clinical needs, treatment information, and the role of the various medical disciplines involved in the care.

Trans and gender diverse children and teenagers, and their parents, have also been consulted along the way.

“We frequently hear that many doctors, and other clinicians, don’t feel confident in what to do or say when they come across trans or gender diverse children or adolescents for the first time. With a guide to help them through all the stages of their care, our patients’ feel that they are likely to get better care and that others will also have a more positive experience when approaching doctors or psychologists,” she adds.

 

Design Agency ‘Frog’ Redesigns The Dreaded Gynecology Exam

co.design

Cold metal. Eerie clicking sound. Torturous duck-billed shape. Yes, I’m talking about the speculum, the anxiety-inducing device that doctors use to check  vaginal health. Despite its status as an instrument of discomfort and its dark history–involving a doctor who experimented on slave women – the speculum remains to this day one of the centerpieces of the often dreaded annual pelvic exam.

A team of four designers at the global design agency Frog is on a mission to redesign it – and reimagine what it means to go to the gynecologist in the first place.

In[ter]view: SHINE SA’s Dr Amy Moten

Verse magazine, Edition 18, September 2017

This edition we talked to Amy, SHINE SA’s Medical Educator, who is answering all your questions when it comes to the ‘what’s this’ and ‘how do I check that’ of sex.

  1. How often should people who are sexually active get tested?

You should have a test when symptoms of a Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) are first noticed or if a sexual partner is diagnosed with an STI or has symptoms of an STI. Even if you have no symptoms STI screening is recommended for any new sexual contact. Annual screening for people under 30 is recommended, but you can have a test every 3 months if you think you may be at higher risk.

 

New booklet: Vulva & vaginal irritation

Jean Hailes, Last updated 05 May 2017

Jean Hailes has just released a new patient information booklet: The vulva: irritation, diagnosis & treatment. 

Contents:

  • What is normal?
  • Causes of vulva irritation
  • Management & treatment
  • Dryness
  • ‘Good bacteria’ versus ‘bad bacteria’ in the vagina
  • Other natural therapies
  • Irritation
  • Diagnosis
  • Secretions or discharge
  • Odour
  • Probiotics
  • What is the vulva?

Download booklet (PDF) here 

 

 

Working with a transgender man who is pregnant

The Nurse Path blog, February 10., 2017

Some men have vaginas. 

It probably wouldn’t happen very often but if you are a health professional who cares for people during pregnancy and birth (ie a Midwife or Doctor), you may come across a transgender man who is pregnant.

This can be really challenging for people who may not have come across transgender people or issues. This is a guide to maybe help you in that situation. You’re welcome.

Read more here