Cultural Safety workshops with Khadija Gbla (free event)

Morella Community Centre in collaboration with Khadija Gbla, October 2019

WHAT IS CULTURAL SAFETY?

Cultural safety is identified as “an environment that is safe for people: where there is no assault, challenge or denial of their identity, of who they are and what they need. It is about shared respect, shared meaning, shared knowledge and experience, of learning, living and working together with dignity and truly listening”.

Culturally safe practices include actions which recognize and respect the cultural identities of others and safely meet their needs, expectations and rights. Alternatively, culturally unsafe practices are those that “diminish, demean or disempower the cultural identity and well-being of an individual”.

Through these workshops, participants will develop an understanding of cultural safety and how to apply cultural safety principles into their work and personal life.

WORKSHOP TOPICS:
SESSION 1: Friday 8th November – Introduction to Cultural Safety
SESSION 2: Friday 22nd November – Cultural Safety, an Educational context*
*This session is aimed for anyone working in an education setting
SESSION 3: Friday 6th December – Cultural Safety for Service Providers

TIME: 10am -11:30am for all workshop topics.

LOCATION: MORELLA COMMUNITY CENTRE
90 Kings Road, Parafield Gardens SA 5107

COST: Free

FACILITATOR: Khadija Gbla is a very passionate and inspiring African-Australian woman. She is an award-winning human rights activist, leader and inspirational speaker.
Khadija Gbla was born in Sierra Leone, spent her youth in Gambia, and as a teenager put down roots in Australia. Khadija was just 3 years old when the war broke out in her country, Sierra Leone and 10 years later they attained refugee status and resettled in Adelaide.
Khadija continues to provide advocacy, training, speaking on domestic and family violence, child protection, racism, human rights, refugees and cultural diversity through her cultural consultancy. She is the co-founder of The Desert Flower Centre and foundation Australia. The Desert Flower Australia is the first centre in Australia and the Asia pacific region that specialises in providing medical care and reconstructive surgery for women impacted by female genital mutilation. Khadija is a TEDX speaker with close to 2 million views on her talk, “My mother’s strange definition of empowerment”. She has represented Australia in the international arena at the Harvard National Model United Nations, Commonwealth Youth Forum and Australian and African Dialogue, Commonwealth heads of states Women’s forum etc. she has displayed great courage and determination in achieving her aspiration of giving women, youth and minority groups a voice at local, state and international level.

The Power of Words – Alcohol and Other Drug use

Alcohol & Drug Foundation, 2019

A resource for healthcare and other professionals

There’s power in language. By focusing on people, rather than their use of alcohol and other drugs, and by choosing words that are welcoming and inclusive, professionals working with people who use alcohol and other drugs can reduce the impact of stigma.

Stigma in the form of language and actions can make people who use, or have used alcohol and other drugs, feel unwelcome and unsafe. This can stop them from seeking the services they need, which can negatively impact their health, wellbeing, employment and social outcomes.

How to use this guide

The Power of Words contains evidence-based advice on using non-stigmatising language, and features an easy-to-navigate, colour-coded directory of alternative words and phrases to suit a range of common scenarios.

It’s important that consistent, appropriate language is used when speaking about alcohol and other drug use in all contexts, be it speaking directly to a client or through indirect communication to a broad audience.

Recognising this, the recommendations within Power of Words have been developed to be easily adopted by healthcare professionals as well as anyone working in management, people and culture, education, marketing, the media or social media.

The Power of Words has been produced by the Alcohol and Drug Foundation, Association of Participating Service Users/Self Help Addiction Resource Centre (APSU/SHARC), Department of Health and Human Services, Harm Reduction Victoria and Penington Institute, following an extensive review of evidence-based literature as well as focus groups with people with lived experience and their families.

FRESH: Aboriginal Focus course on 27-28 June

SHINE SA, 29/05/2019

The FRESH Course: Aboriginal Focus is a 2-day course for workers who wish to improve their sexual and reproductive health knowledge and address sexual and reproductive health and relationship issues within Aboriginal communities.

On completion of the FRESH course, you will:

  • have an increased level of confidence working with Aboriginal communities in the area of sexual health
  • have a better understanding of cultural sensitivities and how to engage around sexual health
  • be able to identify the sexual health issues faced by Aboriginal people in South Australia
  • be introduced to new sexual health language and communication skills to improve client/worker relationships
  • develop skills to yarn with clients about their sexual health needs
  • be exposed to appropriate Aboriginal sexual health resources

WHEN: 27-28 June 2019
WHERE: SHINE SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville
TIME: 9.00am – 5.00pm
COST: $250

Download flyer: FRESH Aboriginal Focus 2019

Policy Consultation Forum: LGBTIQ and youth community feedback sought

SHINE SA, August 2018

LGBTIQ and youth community feedback is sought on SA Health Equity and Access in Health Care Policy Directive & Southern Adelaide Local Health Network (SALHN) Adult Community Mental Health Model of Care. 

Members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ) communities and young people (under 30) are invited to an information session to learn about the draft Equity and Access in Health Care Policy Directive for SA Health as well as the draft SALHN Adult Community Mental Health Model of Care. SA Health and SALHN, in partnership with SHINE SA, are facilitating an information and feedback session about these important documents. We look forward to hearing your views on the policy and model of care.

The SA Health Policy aims to provide a comprehensive overarching framework which consolidates equity and access requirements for South Australia’s diverse health consumers consistent with the South Australian Government Universal Access and Inclusion Guidelines (the Guidelines). The Policy is intended to provide strategic direction to SA Health employees, or persons who provide health care services on behalf of SA Health, to ensure that access to public health services is equitable for all South Australian health consumers.

The central purpose of the SALHN Adult Community Mental Health Model of Care is to provide high level guidance pertaining to the provision of safe and high quality care to Southern Adelaide Local Health Networks diverse mental health consumers. The core principles speak to the provision of person centred, evidence based recovery oriented care that is provided by an appropriately diverse multi-disciplinary team. Strong emphasis has been placed upon care delivery within the context of a culturally and linguistically safe service that engenders strong collaborative partnerships across agencies and between consumers, carers and health professionals. A Service Plan is being developed to operationalise the Model of Care, and both elements will be implemented in parallel once development is complete.

Tuesday, August 28 at 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM

At SHINE SA, 57 Hyde Street, Adelaide 5000

Free event

Light refreshments will be provided

Image may contain: 2 people, people smiling, hat and textmodel of care

‘Sussing that doctor out’: Experiences of people affected by hepatitis C regarding private GPs in SA

‘Sussing that doctor out.’ Experiences and perspectives of people affected by hepatitis C regarding engagement with private general practitioners in South Australia: a qualitative study

BMC Fam Pract. 2017 Nov 29;18(1):97. doi: 10.1186/s12875-017-0669-2.

Abstract

Background: Australians with chronic hepatitis C (HCV) can access affordable Direct Acting Antiviral (DAA) treatments with high cure rates (>90%), via General Practitioners (GPs). Benefits from this treatment will be maximised if people with HCV readily disclose and engage with private GPs regarding HCV-related issues. Investigating the perceptions and experiences of people affected by HCV with GPs can allow for this pathway to care for HCV to be improved.

Methods: In 2013–2014, 22 purposively sampled participants from South Australia (SA) were interviewed. They a) had contracted or were at risk of hepatitis C (n = 10), b) were key workers who had clients affected by HCV (n = 6), and c) met both a) and b) criteria (n = 6). The semi-structured interviews were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed.

Results: People affected by HCV viewed GPs as a source of general healthcare but, due to negative experiences and perceptions, many developed a strategy of “sussing” out doctors before engaging with and disclosing to a GP regarding HCV-related issues. Participants were doubtful about the benefits of engagement and disclosure, and did not assume that they would be provided best-practice care in a non-discriminatory, non-judgemental way. They perceived risks to confidentiality and risks of changes to the care they received from GPs upon disclosure.

Conclusion: GPs may need to act in ways that counteract the perceived risks and persuade people affected by HCV of the benefits of seeking HCV-related care.

Recognise and Respond to Disclosures of Rape and Sexual Assault -1 Day Training

Women’s and Children’s Health Network, June 2018

This training is designed for workers in all areas of human services and health
care. The focus will be on providing knowledge, skills and attributes necessary to
provide appropriate trauma informed response to adults who have been raped
or sexually assaulted.

This involves an understanding of the context in which rape and sexual assault occurs; the ability to assess client needs and match them to services available; and supporting the rights of clients through the implementation of practices which promote client self-determination.

Prerequisites:  None
When: 9:30am – 4:30pm TUESDAY 4th SEPTEMBER, 2018
Where: Yarrow Place, Level 2, 55 King William Road, North Adelaide
Cost: $150.00 + GST per day (WCHN Staff discount $50 + GST per day). Invoice will be sent to the person responsible for the payment

Morning tea and lunch provided

RSVP: Please email marianne.law@sa.gov.au to register. Seating is strictly limited.

Parking: Yarrow Place has no on-site parking available, there is parking at the Women’s & Children’s Hospital or Wilson’s car park on Kermode Street otherwise there is 2 hour street parking around the North Adelaide area.

This training is presented by Yarrow Place staff

Download flyer: 18.9.4 R R YP Training 4th Sept