Expanded HIV PrEP implementation in communities in NSW (EPIC-NSW): design of an open label, single arm implementation trial

BMC Public Health 
https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-017-5018-9

 Published: 2 February 2018

Abstract:

Background

The New South Wales (NSW) HIV Strategy 2016–2020 aims for the virtual elimination of HIV transmission in NSW, Australia, by 2020. Despite high and increasing levels of HIV testing and treatment since 2012, the annual number of HIV diagnoses in NSW has remained generally unchanged. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is highly effective in preventing HIV infection among gay and bisexual men (GBM) when taken appropriately. However, there have been no population-level studies that evaluate the impact of rapid PrEP scale-up in high-risk GBM. Expanded PrEP Implementation in Communities in NSW (EPIC-NSW) is a population-level evaluation of the rapid, targeted roll-out of PrEP to high-risk individuals.

Methods

EPIC-NSW, is an open-label, single-arm, multi-centre prospective observational study of PrEP implementation and impact. Over 20 public and private clinics across urban and regional areas in NSW have participated in the rapid roll-out of PrEP, supported by strong community mobilization and PrEP promotion. The study began on 1 March 2016, aiming to enroll at least 3700 HIV negative people at high risk of HIV. This estimate took into consideration criteria for PrEP prescription in people at high risk for acquiring HIV as defined in the NSW PrEP guidelines. Study participants receive once daily co-formulated tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) and are followed for up to 24 months. Follow-up includes: testing for HIV at 1 month, HIV and other sexually transmissible infections three-monthly, HCV annually and monitoring of renal function six-monthly. Optional online behavioural surveys are conducted quarterly. The co-primary endpoints are (i) HIV diagnoses and incidence in the cohort and (ii) HIV diagnoses in NSW.

Discussion

EPIC-NSW is a population-based PrEP implementation trial which targets the entire estimated population of GBM at high risk for HIV infection in NSW. It will provide a unique opportunity to evaluate the population impact of PrEP on a concentrated HIV epidemic.

New resources from SIN

SIN (South Australian Adult Industry Workers Association), February 2018

The posters below were originally designed in an effort to engage migrant students with SIN’s services. However, they are not restricted to students, and may be a beneficial engagement tool in many environments.  Please feel free to distribute these to any setting where you feel they may be beneficial – with a particular focus on tertiary settings. 

SIN also has a CALD project worker, providing outreach, peer education, information, referrals, support, advocacy and safer sex supplies to migrant sex workers and sex workers from non-English speaking backgrounds. Suree is a Thai speaking peer educator available for support on all the issues that affect sex workers.

The CALD project holds social and educational events throughout the year, such as dinners, bingo nights, skill shares and workshops. Peer engagements, intensive assistance and new worker trainings are also offered by SIN’s CALD project worker.

Project Worker: Suree

Office: (08) 8351 7626 / Mobile: 0450 847 626 / Email: cald@sin.org.au

Hours: Wednesday & Thursday 1:30pm – 5:00pm, and Friday 10:00am – 5:00pm

 

Forum: Engaging Marginalised Populations in Hepatitis C Treatment

Hepatitis SA, January 2018

Hepatitis SA invites you to The 2018 HepLINK Forum:
Engaging Marginalised Populations in Hepatitis C Treatment

Thjis will be held on Thursday, 1 March, 11am–2pm (lunch provided), at the Education Development Centre (EDC), 4 Milner St, Hindmarsh.

  • Keynote speaker:
    Dr Phillip Read, Director, Kirketon Road Centre
    Dr Phillip Read is a sexual health physician and the Director of the Kirketon Road Centre in Sydney’s Kings Cross. Kirketon Road is a primary health care facility involved in the prevention, treatment and care of HIV, hepatitis and STIs among people who inject drugs, sex workers and at-risk young people.
    PLUS
  •  Rosalie Altus, Practice Consultant Viral Hepatitis Liaison Nurse, Flinders Medical Centre
  • Panel discussion with guest speakers representing the Aboriginal, youth, regional, multicultural and CNP sectors across South Australia

Please RSVP to admin@hepatitissa.asn.au by Friday 23 February, 2018.

For further information about the event, please phone Tess on 8362 8443.

A team effort: preventing violence against women through sport

Our Watch, November 2017

Sport is an integral part of Australian culture and it is woven into the fabric of the everyday lives of many Australian individuals, families and communities.

Change the story: a shared national framework for the primary prevention of violence against women and their children in Australia identifies it as a key setting for the prevention of violence against women in Australia.

On and off the field, sport has great potential to influence social change and prevent violence against women by creating inclusive, equitable, healthy and safe environments for men and women, boys and girls.

Sport has the capacity to influence, inform and shape attitudes and behaviours in both negative and positive ways. Sporting environments are places where violence against women can occur directly and, if allowed, can provide a setting for entrenched violence-supportive attitudes and behaviours to be played out. However, this doesn’t have to be the way. Sport can be a leader to empower, motivate and inspire change, on and off the field. Sport is a powerful environment to connect boys and girls, men and women with vital information, skills and strategies to push for inclusive, equitable, healthy and safe sporting spaces for everyone.

The challenge is to extend the notion of equality and fairness into the core business of sport by addressing the drivers of violence against women and stop it before it starts.

Evidence-Informed Public Health: resources and information

National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (Canada), 2017

Evidence-Informed Public Health is the process of distilling and disseminating the best available evidence from research, context and experience, and using that evidence to inform and improve public health practice and policy.

Put simply, it means finding, using and sharing what works in public health.

Canada’s NCCMT has a range of tools and resources on Evidence-Informed Public Health,  from factsheets to online learning modules.

  • Access EIPH resources here 

SAMESH Newsletter Spring 2017

SAMESH, 20/09/2017

The Spring newsletter is now available from SAMESH: South Australia Mobilisation + Empowerment for Sexual Health.

SAMESH provides support, education and training about Sexual Health and HIV for men who have sex with men and people living with HIV, as well as services for the broader LGBTIQ community, in South Australia. It is a joint program of SHine SA and VAC.