Cultural and linguistic diversity of people living with chronic hepatitis B

Cultural and linguistic diversity of people living with chronic hepatitis B in 2011–2016: changing migration, shifting epidemiology
Aust NZ J Public Health. 2018; 42:441-3; doi: 10.1111/1753-6405.12826
Abstract
Objective: To estimate the cultural and linguistic diversity in Australians currently living with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), the majority of whom were born overseas, and to identify trends in this diversity over time.
Methods: Estimates were generated by combining Australian census country of birth
information with seroprevalence data generated from antenatal serology linked with
surveillance notifications. The number of people living with CHB was assessed according to country of birth using the 2011 and 2016 censuses.
Results: The total number of Australian residents living with CHB increased by 20% between 2011 and 2016, substantially outpacing population growth. The most common country of birth continued to be China, with the number of Chinese-born Australians living with CHB increasing by 60% in the 5-year period. Decreased numbers were observed for people born in European countries.
Conclusions: The epidemiology of chronic hepatitis B in Australia has shifted over time due to changing migration patterns, with increases in many countries in the Asia-Pacific, African and Middle Eastern regions. 
Implications for public health: Interventions to improve the health of people living with CHB are imperative, and these up-to-date estimates identify priority groups and communities, which are constantly changing.

New online learning from ASHM tackles stigma and discrimination in healthcare

The Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine (ASHM), 1 st March 2019

To mark Zero Discrimination Day, today ASHM has launched Removing Barriers, a new online learning tool for addressing stigma and discrimination in healthcare settings against people affected by HIV, hepatitis B or hepatitis C. 

The Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine (ASHM) received funding from the Australian Government Department of Health to address systemic barriers and stigma and discrimination to increase access to the health system by people at risk of or with hepatitis B, hepatitis C or HIV.

“Removing Barriers makes it everybody’s business to change what we say, change what we do and work together in removing the unacceptable barriers of stigma and discrimination across the health system.”

It’s hard to think about, but frail older women in nursing homes get sexually abused too

The Conversation, November 22, 2018 6.02am AEDT

We don’t often think of older women being victims of sexual assault, but such assaults occur in many settings and circumstances, including in nursing homes. Our research, published this week in the journal Legal Medicine, analysed 28 forensic medical examinations of female nursing home residents who had allegedly been victims of sexual assault in Victoria over a 15-year period.

The majority of the alleged victims had some form of cognitive or physical impairment. All 14 perpetrators who were reported were male, half of whom were staff and half other residents.

 

 

Hepatitis C Virus – for GPs, Nurses and Allied Health Professionals

Sonder, October 2018

In this education session, presenters Dr Dep Huynh, Ms Margery Milner and Mr Jeff Stewart will provide attendees with an update on the risk factors associated with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and the management options available.

The presenters will also provide information on liver cirrhosis tests and how to choose and initiate the most appropriate HCV treatment for patients.

Learning objectives

  • Identify and understand the risk factors for HCV screening;
  • Perform correct diagnosis of chronic HCV using reflexive testing;
  • Assess and manage patients for liver cirrhosis using non-invasive tests;
  • Improve patient safety by choosing the most appropriate HCV treatment according to the patient’s characteristics and co-medications;
  • Discuss and improve your understanding on how to initiate HCV treatment.

Presented by

Dr Dep Huynh, Gastroentrologist & Staff Specialist at Queen Elizabeth Hospital,
Clinical Lecturer, University of South Australia

Margery Milner & Jeff Stewart, Nurses at Queen Elizabeth Hospital

Agenda

6.30pm – 7.00pm Registration and dinner
7.00pm – 8.00pm Presentation by Dr Dep Huynh, Gastroentrologist & Staff Specialist at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Clinical Lecturer, University of South Australia8.00pm – 8.10pm Tea/coffee break
8.10pm – 9.10pm Presentation by Margery Milner & Jeff Stewart, Nurses at Queen Elizabeth Hospital
9.10pm – 9.30pm Questions, evaluation & close

RACGP QI & CPD Category 2, 4 Points

DATE AND TIME

Mon. 5 November 2018

6:15 pm – 9:30 pm ACDT

LOCATION

Arya Restaurant

30/81 O’Connell Street

North Adelaide, SA 5006

This program is funded by the Adelaide Primary Health Network - an Australian Government initiative

 

Survey for Women living with HIV

napwha, femfatales, Relationships Australia South Australia, September 2018

WOMEN’S EXPERIENCE OF LIVING WITH HIV AND AGEING

This survey is the result of a collaboration between MOSAIC, NAPWHA and Femfatales. They encourage all women living with HIV, regardless of age, to be motivated to consider their health, to reflect on living with HIV, and to complete this survey so that their voices may be heard.

The feedback from this survey can be used to make positive changes in the delivery of support to women living with HIV. Please complete this survey by Friday October 26th 2018. The survey should take 10-15 minutes to complete.

‘Sussing that doctor out’: Experiences of people affected by hepatitis C regarding private GPs in SA

‘Sussing that doctor out.’ Experiences and perspectives of people affected by hepatitis C regarding engagement with private general practitioners in South Australia: a qualitative study

BMC Fam Pract. 2017 Nov 29;18(1):97. doi: 10.1186/s12875-017-0669-2.

Abstract

Background: Australians with chronic hepatitis C (HCV) can access affordable Direct Acting Antiviral (DAA) treatments with high cure rates (>90%), via General Practitioners (GPs). Benefits from this treatment will be maximised if people with HCV readily disclose and engage with private GPs regarding HCV-related issues. Investigating the perceptions and experiences of people affected by HCV with GPs can allow for this pathway to care for HCV to be improved.

Methods: In 2013–2014, 22 purposively sampled participants from South Australia (SA) were interviewed. They a) had contracted or were at risk of hepatitis C (n = 10), b) were key workers who had clients affected by HCV (n = 6), and c) met both a) and b) criteria (n = 6). The semi-structured interviews were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed.

Results: People affected by HCV viewed GPs as a source of general healthcare but, due to negative experiences and perceptions, many developed a strategy of “sussing” out doctors before engaging with and disclosing to a GP regarding HCV-related issues. Participants were doubtful about the benefits of engagement and disclosure, and did not assume that they would be provided best-practice care in a non-discriminatory, non-judgemental way. They perceived risks to confidentiality and risks of changes to the care they received from GPs upon disclosure.

Conclusion: GPs may need to act in ways that counteract the perceived risks and persuade people affected by HCV of the benefits of seeking HCV-related care.