The Talk: How Adults Can Promote Young People’s Healthy Relationships and Prevent Misogyny and Sexual Harassment

Harvard University, 17 May 2017

This is the talk we need to have with young people. Many adults—especially parents—often fret about youth and the “hook-up culture.” But research suggests that far fewer young people are “hooking up” than we are commonly led to believe. This focus on the hook-up culture also obscures two much bigger issues that many young people appear to be struggling with: forming and maintaining healthy romantic relationships and dealing with widespread misogyny and sexual harassment. What’s more, it appears that parents and other key adults in young people’s lives often fail to address these two problems.

Making Caring Common’s new report, The Talk: How Adults Can Promote Young People’s Healthy Relationships and Prevent Misogyny and Sexual Harassment, explores these issues and offers insights into how adults can begin to have meaningful and constructive conversations about them with the young people in their lives.

Working with gender diverse young people and their families: free webinar

Australian Institute of Family Studies, April 2017

Working with gender diverse young people and their families: a free webinar presented by Dr Louise Cooper and Ari Dunphy

Increasing numbers of children and young people are identifying as gender questioning, gender diverse or transgender, and presenting for support from professionals in mental health, family services, and child and youth services. Queerspace at Drummond Street Services has responded to many families presenting for assistance for themselves, their child, siblings and other family members or caregivers in dealing with the questions and challenges that arise from the experience of being gender diverse.

This webinar will introduce ideas of gender and identity formation and discuss the struggles that individuals, families and services face in responding to the changing landscape in this area. Adapted case studies from Queerspace’s own work will be used to discuss ways of working with and supporting these young people and their family members. This webinar will provide an opportunity to explore some of the essential information and skills needed for practitioners to deepen their understanding of gender, and work in an inclusive and affirmative manner.

Developing a national LGBTIQ disability strategy – a national consultation

National LGBTI Health Alliance, March 2017

  • Are you an LGBTIQ* person living with disability?
  • Are you the intimate partner/carer for an LGBTIQ person living with disability?
  • Would you like to ensure your lived experience contributes to guiding the work of the National Disability Insurance Agency [NDIA] into the future?

*Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex, or Queer

How to get involved:  

Step One: Apply to attend the Lived Experience Forum in Melbourne on 31 March
Step Two: Click here to complete the online survey before March 31
Step Three: Share this page with your friends!

About the Consultation

The LGBTI Health Alliance, in partnership with the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA), is conducting a nationwide consultation that will contribute to the development of an LGBTIQ Strategy. This Strategy will guide the work of the NDIA in the coming years and help to ensure that LGBTIQ people and communities can access and benefit from the National Disability Insurance Scheme [NDIS].

The consultation has two parts: A survey and a Lived Experience Forum

  1. The Lived Experience Forum

The Lived Experience Forum will bring together LGBTIQ people living with disability from around Australia for an in-person meeting with the NDIA in Melbourne. This is an incredibly important opportunity for LGBTIQ people who live with disability to meet with the NDIA and share their wisdom gained from personal experience. Funding is available to support travel costs.
We call on all LGBTI people living with disabilities, and their intimate partners/carers, to apply to attend this Forum.

Click here to submit your expression of interest

  1. The survey 

The survey will ensure that people from around Australia can contribute their wisdom to this consultation – wherever they are. If required it is also possible to complete the survey by telephone. The survey will take 15-30 minutes to complete and is anonymous.

Click here to complete the survey now

Inquiries: If you have questions about this consultation please contact info@lgbtihealth.org.au or call us on (02) 8568 1123

Sex and Disability on SBS Insight next week

SBS Insight
Airdate: Tuesday, April 12, 2016 at 20:30

Channel: SBS

Imagine: you’ve been married to your partner for 25  years. You live with them, love them, are sexually attracted to them, but physical intimacy? Almost impossible.

This is the reality for David and Jenni Heckendorf, who both have profound cerebral palsy that greatly limits their mobility. In order to have sex, they must use the services of a sex worker; a process of extreme trust, vulnerability and financial cost.

They lobbied to use their NDIS funding to access their sex worker, but others are restricted by state laws and regulations around sex work.

Rachel Wotton is one such sex worker, who works with clients with physical and intellectual disabilities.

What if your child had an intellectual disability? How do you teach them about all the nuances of sex and sexuality: consent, attraction, pleasure, emotion, consequences?

Mary McMahon has helped her gay son negotiate porn. Jarrod McGrath teaches sex-ed classes for children with intellectual disabilities.

And what happens, if and when kids come along? What is the most ethical course of action?

This week, Insight is looking at two issues that are definitely not mutually exclusive: sex and disability.

Tireless voice for women with disabilities wins lifetime award

The Age, November 25, 2015

Are women with disabilities “vulnerable”? Far from it, says Keran Howe. She doesn’t like the term, believing it makes the woman she has worked with as an advocate for more than 30 years seem passive, or submissive.

Instead, women with disabilities are targeted, says Howe, by people who use sexual abuse and family violence to control and intimidate them

Read more here

More sex please: ending barriers in the bedroom [for people with physical disabilities]

Sydney Morning Herald, November 11, 2015

Now 23, Ariane was born with cerebral palsy spastic quadriplegia, which means she has reduced muscle tone in parts of her body and uses a wheelchair.

It also means, like many people with physical disabilities, she has relied on assistance in the past to lead a normal adult sexual life; including help getting undressed before hopping into bed with her boyfriend at the time (who also had a physical disability).

“There’s this idea that we’re not allowed to have sex, that it’s gross,” says Ariane.

  • Read more of this article here
  • Read about the Deakin University study here