Public Cervix Announcement campaign

Thorne Harbour Health, September 2019

Cancer Council Victoria, November 2019

As more research reveals concerning health outcomes for lesbian, bisexual and queer (LBQ) identified women, it is encouraging that there is a shift in focus towards improving health for LBQ women from both mainstream and LGBTIQ health organisations. As part of Women’s Health Week (September 2 – 6) we thought we’d take you through one of our campaigns which was created to raise awareness around cervical screening.

The reasons why these groups don’t screen as often as they should include people thinking they don’t need to screen, feeling embarrassed or frightened and fearing homophobia or transphobia. The fact is, all LGBTIQ people with a cervix between the ages of 25 and 74, need cervical screening every five years to reduce their risk of cervical cancer, no matter who they have had as a sexual partner.

Working with Cancer Council Victoria, Thorne Harbour Health created the ‘Public Cervix Announcement’ campaign. This campaign was created to raise awareness around cervical cancer and debunk some of the myths around who should be screened.

PCA postcard

 

 

 

Sexual minority women face barriers to health care

The Conversation, October 23, 2019 9.25pm AEDT

Stigma and discrimination are common experiences that people who identify as LGBT or sexual minority face when accessing health services. One report found that one in seven LGBT people in the UK avoided seeking healthcare for fear of discrimination from staff. As many as one in four also experienced negative remarks against LGBT people from healthcare staff.

 

When Love Hurts: Domestic Violence Through the Lens of LGBTIQ+ Relationships

Diversity Council Australia (DCA), 21 Oct 2019

Power and control drive all domestic violence cases. But how does intimate partner violence play out in same sex and LGBTIQ+ relationships? What differences are there, and how do we recognise and put safety strategies in place to support them?

The Art of Inclusion* is DCA’s own podcast, peering into the lives of fascinating people, whose stories shed light on the wider social issues facing Australia, and the world.

In this episode, we hear first-hand from a survivor of domestic violence in a same-sex relationship.

The episode’s expert is Kai Noonan from ACON.

Produced and written by:Andrea Maltman Rivera and Sam Loy. Researched and hosted by: Andrew Maxwell. Executive produced by: Lisa Annese.

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Type 2 diabetes: Sexual orientation may influence risk

Medical News Today, Published

The new study — which was led by Heather L. Corliss, a professor at San Diego State University’s Graduate School of Public Health in California — suggests that women who identify as lesbian or bisexual are at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

The findings were published in the journal Diabetes Care.

 

http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc17-2656

 

 

Australian report finds disturbing evidence of gender inequality

Guardian Australia, March 8th

Incorrect assumptions are being made that gender equality has been achieved despite disturbing and comprehensive evidence to the contrary, an investigation by Australia’s sex discrimination commissioner, Kate Jenkins, has found.

“There are many different voices in this, and my voice is tied to having spoken to rural women, LGBTI women, older women, women with disabilities, migrant women and Aboriginal women.”

  • Read more of article here 
  • Download the report (PDF) here
  • Download the infographic (jpg) here

 

Group interventions key to improving health of older lesbian, bisexual women, study finds

The results of a US study suggest that group intervention is an effective tool to help aging lesbian and bisexual women improve their overall health behaviours. The study, published today in a supplement to the journal Women’s Health Issues, addresses growing concerns over health disparities amongst women in this demographic, which include elevated levels of stress, anxiety, substance abuse and larger body sizes in comparison to their heterosexual counterparts.

  • Read more of press release here
  • Access entire supplement (open access) here