A team effort: preventing violence against women through sport

Our Watch, November 2017

Sport is an integral part of Australian culture and it is woven into the fabric of the everyday lives of many Australian individuals, families and communities.

Change the story: a shared national framework for the primary prevention of violence against women and their children in Australia identifies it as a key setting for the prevention of violence against women in Australia.

On and off the field, sport has great potential to influence social change and prevent violence against women by creating inclusive, equitable, healthy and safe environments for men and women, boys and girls.

Sport has the capacity to influence, inform and shape attitudes and behaviours in both negative and positive ways. Sporting environments are places where violence against women can occur directly and, if allowed, can provide a setting for entrenched violence-supportive attitudes and behaviours to be played out. However, this doesn’t have to be the way. Sport can be a leader to empower, motivate and inspire change, on and off the field. Sport is a powerful environment to connect boys and girls, men and women with vital information, skills and strategies to push for inclusive, equitable, healthy and safe sporting spaces for everyone.

The challenge is to extend the notion of equality and fairness into the core business of sport by addressing the drivers of violence against women and stop it before it starts.

No excuses: government releases new guidelines on sexist language

The Age, April 10

“Boys will be boys.” “He’s picking on you because he likes you.” “Don’t throw like a girl.”

These are the kinds of phrases that the Australian government is attempting to eradicate with a new tool in its anti-violence campaign aimed at educators and influencers of young people.

  • Read more here 
  • Download No Excuses Guideline (PDF) here 

John & Tony’s story: love, brain injury, and domestic violence

news.com.au, October 14, 20159:40am

At their most severe, John’s outbursts have inflicted broken teeth and stitches to his partner Tony’s head.

It’s rare to hear someone admit to being a perpetrator of domestic violence. And what John has done is shocking. There’s no question about it. But everyone close to John attests that he was never violent before he sustained a severe brain injury nine years ago.

John’s story is surprisingly common.

With the support of Headway ADP, a specialist support service for adults with an acquired brain injury in Sydney, John hopes to seek further brain-injury specific counselling to assist him with anger management.

Read more here