Cultural and linguistic diversity of people living with chronic hepatitis B

Cultural and linguistic diversity of people living with chronic hepatitis B in 2011–2016: changing migration, shifting epidemiology
Aust NZ J Public Health. 2018; 42:441-3; doi: 10.1111/1753-6405.12826
Abstract
Objective: To estimate the cultural and linguistic diversity in Australians currently living with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), the majority of whom were born overseas, and to identify trends in this diversity over time.
Methods: Estimates were generated by combining Australian census country of birth
information with seroprevalence data generated from antenatal serology linked with
surveillance notifications. The number of people living with CHB was assessed according to country of birth using the 2011 and 2016 censuses.
Results: The total number of Australian residents living with CHB increased by 20% between 2011 and 2016, substantially outpacing population growth. The most common country of birth continued to be China, with the number of Chinese-born Australians living with CHB increasing by 60% in the 5-year period. Decreased numbers were observed for people born in European countries.
Conclusions: The epidemiology of chronic hepatitis B in Australia has shifted over time due to changing migration patterns, with increases in many countries in the Asia-Pacific, African and Middle Eastern regions. 
Implications for public health: Interventions to improve the health of people living with CHB are imperative, and these up-to-date estimates identify priority groups and communities, which are constantly changing.

HIV diagnoses in migrant populations in Australia: a changing epidemiology

PLoS ONE ,14(2): e0212268. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0212268

Abstract

Introduction

We conducted a detailed analysis of trends in new HIV diagnoses in Australia by country of birth, to understand any changes in epidemiology, relationship to migration patterns and implications for public health programs.

Methods

Poisson regression analyses were performed, comparing the age-standardised HIV diagnosis rates per 100,000 estimated resident population between 2006–2010 and 2011–2015 by region of birth, with stratification by exposure (male-to-male sex, heterosexual sex–males and females). Correlation between the number of permanent and long-term arrivals was also explored using linear regression models.

Results

Between 2006 and 2015, there were 6,741 new HIV diagnoses attributed to male-to-male sex and 2,093 attributed to heterosexual sex, with the proportion of diagnoses attributed to male-to-male sex who were Australian-born decreasing from 72.5% to 66.5%. Compared with 2006–2010, the average annual HIV diagnosis rate per 100,000 in 2011–15 attributed to male-to-male sex was significantly higher in men born in South-East Asia (summary rate ratio (SRR) = 1.37, p = 0.001), North-East Asia (SRR = 2.18, p<0.001) and the Americas (SRR = 1.37, p = 0.025), but significantly lower as a result of heterosexual sex in men born in South-East Asia (SRR = 0.49, p = 0.002), Southern and Central Asia (SRR = 0.50, p = 0.014) and Sub-Saharan Africa (SRR = 0.39, p<0.001) and women born in South-East Asia (SRR = 0.61, p = 0.002) and Sub-Saharan Africa (SRR = 0.61, p<0.001). Positive associations were observed between the number of permanent and long-term arrivals and HIV diagnoses particularly in relation to diagnoses associated with male-to-male sex in men from North Africa and the Middle East, North Asia, Southern and Central Asia and the Americas.

Conclusion

The epidemiology of HIV in Australia is changing, with an increase in HIV diagnosis rates attributed to male-to-male sex amongst men born in Asia and the Americas. Tailored strategies must be developed to increase access to, and uptake of, prevention, testing and treatment in this group.

 

Upcoming National Day of Women Living with HIV Morning Tea in Adelaide

SAMESH, 15/02/2019

The National Day of Women Living with HIV in Australia was created as an annual event by Femfatales, the National Network of Women Living with HIV at NAPWHA (the National Association of People with HIV Australia), with the idea to situate it after International Women’s Day to promote a greater awareness around HIV and the needs of women living with HIV in Australia.

Join us for morning tea to celebrate and support women living with HIV this year.

The event will be held at SHINE’s Hyde Street site in the city on March 8 from 10:30AM-12:30AM, and will be a chance to recognise and pay tribute to an often overlooked demographic in the fight against HIV.

Donations are welcome, with all proceeds going toward programs that benefit women living with HIV.

All are welcome to attend this tea with friends, family, partners & supporters.

Migrant women are particularly vulnerable to technology-facilitated domestic abuse

The Conversation, February 1, 2019 6.11am AEDT

Migrant women with temporary visa status are particularly vulnerable when it comes to domestic and family violence. That vulnerability is intensified when you add technology to the mix.

In our recent study, we analysed interviews with migrant women who had experienced domestic abuse about their experiences with technology-facilitated abuse. We found while technology can help women to reduce their isolation in a new country, a partner’s control of technology may increase isolation for migrant women, which can heighten the risk of abuse.

 

Australia will never be HIV-free if access to prevention requires a medicare card

The Conversation, January 23, 2019 12.21pm AEDT

by Nicholas Medland, Sexual health physician and senior researcher, UNSW

Australia aims to “virtually eliminate” HIV transmission by 2022, according to the health minister’s new national HIV strategy. This ambitious goal has been made possible by biomedical HIV prevention, a new and highly effective way of preventing HIV using medications.

But new inequalities are emerging between those who can and can’t access these medications because of their Medicare eligibility. These inequalities may undermine the success of HIV elimination in Australia and threaten Australia’s international reputation as a safe place to study, work and live.

Read more of Australia will never be HIV-free if access to prevention requires a medicare card

 

16 days of activism events: Charles Sturt is Saying No to Domestic and Family Violence

City of Charles Sturt, November 2018

Charles Sturt is partnering with local community groups, sports clubs, schools, businesses and key stakeholders to raise awareness and implement violence prevention activities. Several activities are planned for the 16 days of activism from the 25 November (International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women) to 10 December (Human Rights Day).  The 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence Campaign is a time to stimulate action to end violence around the world.

Act of love

Twelve artists have been paired up with members in our community affected by domestic and family violence to paint their portrait. The portraits are a thoughtful portrayal of a larger story capturing exhibition. The Act of Love is the interchange between the artist and the sitter, with the finished portrait being gifted to the sitter at the end of the exhibition.

Clothesline Project

Community members are encouraged to share their unique and empowering responses to Domestic and family violence and decorate a t-shirt. All the t-shirts will be strung up on clotheslines and displayed at various locations across the city to raise awareness. Various locations will be available to paint the t-shirts.

Message to my Love campaign

During the sixteen days of activism at the Civic Library, the Digital Story Box will become a personal story capturing device. Our community will be invited to pick up the phone, listen to a story and then record a personal message of love and respect for a loved one in their life. This could be a daughter, son, partner, parent, best friend or anyone that you love. Leaders in our community will initially be interviewed  and these stories will then be able to be viewed and heard as part of the campaign.

Associated events and exhibitions will also be scheduled during this time as a way to share messages and stories which aim to raise confidence and awareness in our community.

As part of the Message to my Love project, we will be sending post cards with rates notices for community to write their messages. There will be a survey monkey link on the post card for people to fill in online or their will be selected locations to drop in the postcard where they will be displayed as part of the #messagetomylove campaign.

We will be out and about filming community messages at different public spaces. Keep an eye out on our website, social media for further information.

This is an exciting time for our council.  We are committed to creating safe families and communities for everyone and we welcome your involvement in these activities. If you would like more information about these activities and programs please contact Khadija at: kgbla@charlesturt.sa.gov.au

If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic violence or feel unsafe in an intimate or family relationship, 24 hour assistance is available on 1800 RESPECT (1800 737 732), which is the National Sexual Assault Domestic & Family Violence Counselling Service. Or you can go to www.1800respect.org.au