Job vacancy at SHINE SA: Mental Health Clinician / Team Leader, Gender Wellbeing Service

SHINE SA, August 2020

Mental Health Clinician and Team Leader – Gender Wellbeing Service

  • PO3 Level (hourly rate of $44.29 – $46.97 based on experience), Part-time (0.5 FTE)
  • Fixed-term contract to 30 June 2021 with possibility of extension
  • Excellent Salary Sacrificing Scheme

SHINE SA is a leading not-for-profit provider of primary care services and education for sexual and relationship wellbeing. We work in partnership with government, health, education and community agencies, and communities to improve the sexual and reproductive health and relationship well-being of the community. We have an opportunity for a Mental Health Clinician (see Job and Person Specification for the appropriate qualifications) to lead the Gender Wellbeing Service, based in the CBD at our Hyde Street site.

In this role you will provide psychological therapies for gender questioning, trans and gender diverse people in the metropolitan area of Adelaide with mild to moderate mental health concerns.  You will work closely with the Intake and Peer Support Coordinator and Administrative Support worker in the team and have responsibility for overseeing a lived-experience peer support program for volunteers.

This is will be a challenging and rewarding role for the right person, offering a competitive salary and the ability to salary package under the generous conditions available only to not-for-profit organisations.

If you are interested in this role, you are required to address the essential minimum requirements as outlined in the Job and Person Specification available on our SHINE SA web site at the link below.

  • Find out more or apply here: 

Mental Health Clinician and Team Leader – Gender Wellbeing Service

Call for study participants: Image Based Sexual Abuse (IBSA) and its impact on LGBTQ individuals

University of Birmingham, May 2020

Image Based Sexual Abuse (IBSA) and the impact this has on the well-being of LGBTQ individuals

Image Based Sexual Abuse

This PhD study aims to explore LGBTQ individuals’ experiences of Image Based Sexual Abuse (also known as revenge pornography) on their mental health and well-being. The study is also interested in how much health and well-being organisations understand about IBSA and how easy it is for individuals to access services.

Victims of IBSA express symptoms of depression, anxiety and in some instances suicidal tendencies. This harmful impact can be felt in both the private and professional spheres for the victims. Internet users who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning or queer (LGBTQ) are far more likely than those who identify as heterosexual to have experienced threats of or actual non-consensual image-sharing. However, the majority of the current body of research focuses on heterosexual women and there is little research that is aimed at the long-term implications this can have on LGBTQ individuals in regards to their mental health and well-being. All members of the team work in the School of Nursing/ School of Social Policy at the University of Birmingham. Dr Caroline Bradbury-Jones is the Principal PhD Supervisor for this study and is the Programme Lead for the Risk Abuse and Violence Research Programme within the School of Nursing. Dr Nicki Ward is a lecturer in social work and is a PhD Supervisor of this study. Mr Ronnie Meechan-Rogers is a senior lecturer within the school of nursing and is exploring this topic as part of his PhD studies.

If you are LGBTQ and have experienced IBSA we think that you could offer a great deal in helping us with the study.

Key researchers:

  • Dr Caroline Bradbury-Jones

  • Dr Nicki Ward

  • Mr Ronnie Meechan-Rogers

Read more or contact researchers here

 

New service providing mental health support to people of CALD backgrounds

Relationships Australia South Australia, May 2020

ASKPEACE is available to provide mental health support to people of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds living in South Australia who have been impacted by COVID-19.

The ASK Peace Project will provide a virtual service based on counselling and case management, referrals, support and advocacy services to respond to the mental health and wellbeing of CALD individuals, families and communities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

It is not necessary to speak English to access this service.

You can refer your client to this service; they also accept self-referrals.

There is no cost for the service.

Network MindOut webinar: The Impact of Bisexual+ Invisibility on Mental Health

National LGBTI Health Alliance, Recorded 24th March 2020

Bisexual+ people are thought to be the largest group in the LGBTIQ+ population, yet are commonly misunderstood by mainstream society and often invisible in the broader LGBTIQ+ discourse. Although many bisexuals are comfortable with, if not proud of their identity, research from around the world tells us that bisexual+ people are more vulnerable to systemic and individual victimisation than lesbians and gays, and mental health outcomes are particularly poor as a result. This webinar will explore the impacts of bisexual+ invisibility on mental health, and will offer practical tips on how to be more inclusive.

Presenter: Misty Farquhar is a PhD Researcher at the Curtin University Centre for Human Rights Education, where they also teach. Misty’s research explores how people living outside binary ideas of sexuality / gender experience recognition in Australia. Misty is extremely active in community outreach, education, and advocacy efforts and is the founder of Bisexual+ Community Perth.

Client violence towards workers in the child, family and community welfare sector

Australian Institute of Family Studies. CFCA Paper No. 54 – March 2020

This paper explores the prevalence and presentation of client violence towards workers, considering any violent or aggressive behaviour from clients, direct associates of clients, and friends or family members of clients. It compares current research on client violence towards workers to official data reports, and considers why there might be a discrepancy between the two sets of data. It details the effects that client violence has on workers personally and the implications for their practice. Finally, it outlines strategies for improving responses to client violence towards workers, including practical responses that can be implemented at an organisational, educational and policy level.

New resource: LGBTI R U OK? Conversation Guide

National LGBTI Health Alliance and R U OK?,  February 2020

“Life can be challenging, and we all need support during times of grief, loss, relationship breakdown and when we’re under work or financial pressure. On top of this, LGBTI people might be subject to prejudice, stigma, discrimination, harassment, and violence.” 

National LGBTI Health Alliance has collaborated with R U OK? to produce this LGBTI guide which was released just in time for the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras.