Sexual & Reproductive Health Resource Kit for Aboriginal young people

Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council of New South Wales, 2018

The AH&MRC has developed a new vibrant Sexual and Reproductive Health Resource Kit for workers to use with Aboriginal young people named “DOIN ‘IT’ RIGHT!”.

DOIN IT RIGHT! provides workers who work with young Aboriginal people (including non-sexual health and non-Aboriginal workers) with step by step instructions on delivering sexual and reproductive health activities appropriately.

Although the statistics are sobering, ongoing education and health promotion will assist young Aboriginal people to make informed choices about their sexual and reproductive health. Given the decreasing age of first sexual experience, high rates of STIs and teen pregnancy, it is important that age and culturally appropriate information and education is provided to young people from an early age.

Contents:

Introduction
Introduction to Sexual and Reproductive Health ……………………………….. 6
Sexual and Reproductive Health in an Aboriginal Context …………………. 7
Aboriginal Cultural Considerations and the Worker’s Role in Sexual
and Reproductive Health Education …………………………………………………. 9
Working with Aboriginal Young People …………………………………………….. 11
Disclosure ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 13
Organisational Philosophy, Policies and Procedures ………………………… 14
How to Generate Conversations ……………………………………………………….. 15
How to use this Kit …………………………………………………………………………… 19
Welcome to Country and Acknowledgment of Country………………………. 21
Group Agreement …………………………………………………………………………….. 23
Opportunity for Anonymous Questions to be Asked Safely………………… 24

1 Looking After Me
Section Introduction ………………………………………………………………………… 27
Changes When Growing Up
Changing Bodies …………………………………………………………………….. 28
Knowing Your Reproductive System and How It All Works ………. 33

2 My Sexuality and How I Feel About Myself

Section Introduction………………………………………………………………………….. 47
Sexuality and me
Sexuality and Sexual Diversity. Step Forward, Step Back ………….. 48
Myths and Stereotypes about Sexuality ……………………………………. 63
Sexuality and Popular Culture ………………………………………………….. 67
Self Esteem
Self Esteem. I Like Me! …………………………………………………………….. 69

3 Sex, Pregnancy and Keeping Safe
Section Introduction …………………………………………………………………………. 76
Sexual Health – What’s Safe and What’s Not
Healthy Vs Unhealthy ………………………………………………………………. 77
High Risk, Low Risk, No Risk …………………………………………………… 87
Sexually Transmissible Infection Information Sheets ………………… 97
Safer Sex STI & Pregnancy Prevention
Contraception and Safer Sex. Methods and Myths ……………………. 113
Using a Condom – DOIN ‘IT’ RIGHT! …………………………………………. 118
Contraception and Safer Sex Information Sheets ……………………… 125

4 Coming to a Decision
Section Introduction …………………………………………………………………………. 142
Sexual and Other Important Decisions
What’s Most Important …………………………………………………………….. 143
Values and Decisions ………………………………………………………………. 152
Decision Tree and Me ………………………………………………………………. 155
I Can Say No!……………………………………………………………………………. 159
What’s Drugs Got To Do With It?
Are You Thinking What I’m Thinking? ………………………………………. 168
Sex, Drugs and Your Choices ………………………………………………….. 175

5 Evaluation
Section Introduction …………………………………………………………………………. 180
What is evaluation …………………………………………………………………… 181
Types of program evaluation …………………………………………………… 182
Planning your evaluation …………………………………………………………. 183
Data collection methods ………………………………………………………….. 185
Documenting activities ……………………………………………………………. 189
Participant feedback ………………………………………………………………… 191
Further evaluation resources …………………………………………………… 192

6 Additional Resources and Information Pages
Section Introduction ………………………………………………………………………… 194
Glossary of Terms ……………………………………………………………………………. 195
Resources and Organisation Contact Details ……………………………………. 202
Broad Sexual and Reproductive Health Information and
Resources……………………………………………………………………………….. 204
Information and Resources for Parents and Carers…………………… 208
Puberty Information and Resources …………………………………………. 209
Contraceptives Information and Resources ……………………………… 211
Pregnancy and Parenting Information and Resources……………….. 213
Sexually Transmissible Infections Information and Resources…… 215
Sexting Information and Resources…………………………………………… 219
Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Information and
Resources……………………………………………………………………………….. 220
Alcohol and Other Drugs Information and Resources ……………….. 221
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex, Queer (LGBTIQ)
and Same Sex Couples Information and Resources…………………… 224
Blood Borne Viruses: HIV and Hepatitis Information and
Resources……………………………………………………………………………….. 226
Social Emotional Wellbeing Health Information and Resources…. 229
Legal Information and Resources………………………………………………. 231
References ………………………………………………………………………………………. 233

 

Teen sexting: pleasure is missing from the discussion

Sexting has increased among teens in recent years, and increases as youths age, according to new research published in JAMA Pediatrics.

An estimated one in seven teens sends sexts and one in four receives them, according to the research.

The paper reviews 39 studies conducted between 1990 to 2016 involving more than 110,000 participants. Two studies took place in Australia, and others in countries including the United States, Korea and South Africa.

‘Revenge porn’: one in five report they have been victims in Australian survey

Guardian, Monday 8 May 2017

The first comprehensive research on so-called revenge porn has shed light on the “mass scale of victimisation” across Australia and its sometimes devastating impact.

A survey of nearly 4,300 people led by RMIT University and Monash University revealed that 20% of respondents had had images or videos of a nude or sexual nature taken without their consent; 11% had had them share, and 9% had received threats that images of themselves would be shared.

Men and women were equally likely to be victims but the rate was higher among younger people: one in three teenagers aged 16 to 19 and one in four aged 20 to 29 reported at least one form of image victimisation. Marginalised groups – Indigenous and gay, lesbian and bisexual Australians, and those with a disability – were especially vulnerable.

 

New digital resource on revenge po*rn & cyberbullying in SA

The Law Society, 2 November 2016

The Law Society and University of Adelaide have launched a new digital cyberbullying resource which deals with new revenge porn laws that came into force in SA on Friday.

A cyberbullying section has been added to the app Out of Bounds (previously called The Naked Truth), which also explains the laws surrounding unlawful sexual intercourse and sexting.

The new cyberbullying section provides a snapshot of South Australian and Federal laws that can apply to a range of cyberbullying activities, including revenge porn, trolling, and stalking. It also features a graphic novel style narrative about a school student who has been subject to cyber abuse, and the devastating ramifications for both the victim and the perpetrators involved.

The cyberbullying section is a natural extension of the app, said Law Society President David Caruso.

“As well as adding an extensive cyberbullying section, we’ve updated the sexting section of the app to reflect new laws which criminalise revenge porn,” Mr Caruso said.

“Sexting can quickly turn from digital flirting to bullying. Cyberbullying in all its forms is a particularly insidious and devastating form of victimisation. It is impossible to escape, it emboldens more people to demean others under the veil of anonymity, and the vitriol and humiliation can spread far wider and quicker than traditional ‘schoolyard’ bullying.”

“The South Australian Government ought to be commended for acknowledging this and strengthening laws against revenge porn. In saying this, we still see scope for further law reform that reduces the risk of teenagers facing child pornography charges for naïve but innocent behaviour, while maintaining a zero tolerance approach to sexual predators.

“Of course, laws can only do so much – the key is education.”

University of Adelaide law lecturer Dr Colette Langos, who collaborated with the Law Society on the app, said: “Many young people regard sexting as a common behaviour, so it is especially important to make sure they understand where ‘a bit of fun between friends’ crosses the line and becomes unlawful conduct.”

“Evidence-based research informs us that non-consensual behaviour in the form of cyberbullying or ‘revenge porn’ has the potential to harm a victim in a profound manner given the public humiliation which follows distribution of the image online. Law reform in this area may better protect victims.”

Dr Langos said the new law enables police to charge a person under the age of 17 years with a non-indictable offence of ‘distribution of an invasive image’ rather than charging a young person under the child pornography legislation. The new laws also make it an offence to threaten to distribute an invasive image.

“There is a big distinction between abhorrent, predatory conduct and conduct which frequently, and sometimes regrettably, occurs between young people without predatory intent,” Dr Langos said.

Mr Caruso said: “This app is not designed to scare young people into changing their behaviour. It aims to explain the law in a digestible and interactive way to help young people make informed decisions. Many teenagers, and older people for that matter, are not aware of the legal boundaries regarding sexual behaviour and online communication.”

– Download the Out of Bounds app on your Apple Device
– Download the Out of Bounds app on your Android device
– Visit the Out of Bounds webpage

Source

Teens should be educated about safer sexting not just abstinence, report says

The Guardian, Monday 31 October 2016

Teenagers should be educated on how to sext more safely and be respectful of each other rather than be persuaded by educational materials to abstain from sexting, a new report says.

The paper, written by Yfoundations youth health sector support officer Jessie Hunt, is a first in Australian public health policy. It says resources aimed at educating teenagers about sexting are outdated and perpetuate problematic notions surrounding gender.

Sex, Love and Other Stuff: Respectful relationships for young men

Domestic Violence Resource Centre Victoria (DVRCV), 2011

Sex, Love and Other Stuff is a booklet developed for young men, with young men, that talks about sex, relationships, power and respect.

It has been specifically developed from what young men told DVRCV they wanted to know — stuff like, what a ‘relationship’ is, how to talk to girls, and about sex.

There’s quite a bit of information about how to give and get respect, how to communicate with a partner or someone you’re interested in. And there’s a checklist to suss out how respectful a relationship is.

Download resource (PDF) here