Can you get gonorrhoea from kissing?

ABC Radio (Hack), 8th November 2017

In a troubling development, Melbourne researchers suspect gonorrhoea is being spread by kissing, overturning years of conventional wisdom.

Although it’s early days and not cause for alarm, there is evidence to suggest ‘throat-to-throat transmission’ may be driving the spread of gonorrhea in inner-city Australia.

It’s been generally understood you could only get gonorrhea by having vaginal, anal or oral sex with someone who has gonorrhea. Dr Vincent J Cornelisse, a sexual health physician and PhD candidate at Monash University, has been conducting research that challenges this idea.

Professor Basil Donovan, head of the Sexual Health Program at the Kirby Institute, told Hack the finding was “highly tenuous”. “You’ll need a lot more science before you put out a warning,” he said.

 

Evidence-Informed Public Health: resources and information

National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (Canada), 2017

Evidence-Informed Public Health is the process of distilling and disseminating the best available evidence from research, context and experience, and using that evidence to inform and improve public health practice and policy.

Put simply, it means finding, using and sharing what works in public health.

Canada’s NCCMT has a range of tools and resources on Evidence-Informed Public Health,  from factsheets to online learning modules.

  • Access EIPH resources here 

Gardasil 9 now on the National Immunisation Program

AJP, 9th Oct 2017

The Government has announced free access for young people to the improved HPV vaccine.

From 2018, Gardasil 9, which protects against nine HPV strains (up from four) will be offered through school-based immunisation programs to all 12 to 13-year-old boys, and girls in years seven or eight.

Punishing one person for STI transmission weakens public health efforts

The Conversation, September 21, 2017

Is one person to blame if another gets a sexually transmissible infection (STI)? In most Australian states, if you have certain STIs, you have a legal responsibility to notify your potential sexual partners.

The idea that punishing STI exposure or transmission will decrease rates of infection is not supported by global research on HIV, and there is no reason to believe this would be any different for other STIs.

FACTS NOT FEAR: a free forum on undetectable viral load

SAMESH is pleased to invite you – community members, clinicians, sector workers, anyone who may be interested – to their community forum, FACTS NOT FEAR: A forum on undetectable viral load.

 Join our panel of experts and community members to discuss the latest science about undetectable viral load and its role in preventing onward transmission of HIV, and to hear personal perspectives from People Living With HIV on how their experience of intimacy and relationships has been transformed.  There will be presentations and opportunities for questions and answers.

Panel members include:

Professor Mark Boyd

  • Chair of Medicine, Lyell McEwin Hospital, University of Adelaide
  • Principal Research Fellow, SAHMRI
  • Visiting Professorial Fellow, Kirby Institute UNSW Australia
  • President, Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine (ASHM)
  • Co-Editor-in-Chief, AIDS Research and Therapy

 Dr Carole Khaw

  • Consultant Sexual Health Physician, Clinic 275, SASSHS, Infectious Diseases Unit, Royal Adelaide Hospital
  • Clinical Senior Lecturer, School of Medicine, University of Adelaide

 Specially invited Community members

  • Speaking of their personal experiences

Free Event

6.PM – 7.30 PM, Thursday 28 September 2017,  57 Hyde ST, Adelaide

~ Light refreshments provided: a selection of cheeses, wine and juices ~

 

Challenging misconceptions about sexual offending: report (Link fixed)

Australian Institute of Family Studies, 2017

Reports of sexual offences crimes have increased over the last six years. Despite the prevalence of sexual offending in our communities, there is a lack of understanding about these crimes.

Myths and misconceptions about sexual offending are common. This is understandable, because sexual offending is a profoundly hidden crime. Much of what we know about sexual crime is imagined or gained through mainstream media

Most people would not be fully aware of the vast body of scientific literature regarding sexual offending. This is despite the fact that specialist knowledge is the key to effectively responding to sexual crime in the criminal justice system .

The purpose of this resource is to synthesise over 40 years of research evidence to present an accurate and updated picture of sexual offending. With specialist knowledge, we can work towards improving criminal justice responses
and outcomes in cases of sexual crime.

» This reference booklet addresses some of the most significant myths and misconceptions about adult rape and sexual offences, as well as child sexual abuse.
» The evidence has been collated from an analysis of the psychological and criminological literature.
» It provides a clear picture of what should be considered a misconception, alongside the current evidence of what is considered “typical” and “common” behaviour in both offenders and victims.
» There are multiple ways that this resource could be used. It may be useful as a guide to assist fact finders at different stages of the criminal justice process.