How sexual assault survivors can feel in control during cervical screenings

ABC Life By Kellie Scott / 12th August 2020
Kate* avoids cervical screenings.The 34-year-old from Sydney is a survivor of sexual assault and finds the physical examination re-traumatising.

Kate’s experience is not unique.

One in five Australian women has experienced sexual violence since the age of 15. And research shows those who have experienced sexual abuse, either as adults or children, are less likely to attend regular cervical screening.

People with disability are more likely to be victims of crime – here’s why

The Conversation, February 22, 2019 6.06am AEDT

Some of our most vulnerable citizens have been beaten, raped, and even killed at the hands of those supposedly caring for them.

The statistics are alarming. Up to 90% of women with disability have been sexually assaulted. And people with disability are three times as likely to die prematurely than the general population from causes that could have been prevented with better quality care.

But to provide victims with justice, we need to better understand why people with disabilities are more vulnerable to abuse and assault.

A systematic review of Indigenous narratives of culturally safe healthcare communication

The power of talk and power in talk: a systematic review of Indigenous narratives of culturally safe healthcare communication

Australian Journal of Primary Health
doi: 10.1071/PY17082
Volume: 24 Issue: 2

Abstract

The study aimed to explore Indigenous narrative accounts of healthcare access within qualitative research papers, to better understand Indigenous views on culturally safe healthcare and health communication represented in that literature.
A systematic literature review of peer-reviewed academic qualitative studies identified 65 papers containing Indigenous respondents’ views on accessing healthcare.
Analysis included all Indigenous voice (primary quotations) and author findings describing healthcare access across these studies.
Healthcare communication, or ‘talk’, emerged as a key theme. Indigenous clients valued talk within healthcare interactions; it was essential to their experience of care, having the power to foster relationships of trust, strengthen engagement and produce positive outcomes.
By mediating the power differentials between health professionals and Indigenous clients, talk could either reinforce powerlessness, through judgmental down-talk, medical jargon or withholding of talk, or empower patients with good talk, delivered on the client’s level.
Good talk is a critical ingredient to improving Indigenous accessibility and engagement with healthcare services, having the ability to minimise the power differentials between Indigenous clients and the healthcare system.

Language matters when working with people who use alcohol and other drugs…

Network of Alcohol & other Drugs Agencies (NADA) and the NSW Users and AIDS Association (NUAA), 

Language is powerful—especially when discussing alcohol and other drugs
and the people who use them.

A new resource from the Network of Alcohol & other Drugs Agencies (NADA) and the NSW Users and AIDS Association (NUAA) has been launched

Stigmatising language reinforces negative stereotypes. Person-centred language focuses on the person, not their substance use. It is a simple and effective way of showing you respect a person’s agency, dignity and worth.

This resource has been developed for people working in non government alcohol and other drugs (AOD) services. It has been developed in consultation with people who use drugs.The purpose of this resource is to provide workers with guidelines on how to use language to empower clients and reinforce a person-centred approach.

 

Morning tea for National Day of Women Living with HIV in Australia

via SAMESH, a joint program of SHINE SA and VAC, February 2018

NATIONAL DAY OF WOMEN LIVING WITH HIV IN AUSTRALIA: Friday 9 March 2018 

Join us for morning tea to celebrate and support women living with HIV.

“Too often, WLHIV in Australia are considered as an afterthought or swept up in the generic term ‘people living with HIV. Women when not well supported will often go underground after diagnosis and hide in fear or shame of being constantly labelled, judged and stigmatised. This leaves a larger proportion of WLHIV dealing with their diagnosis alone. The Femfatales aim to inspire, celebrate and advocate and give WLHIV the platform to step up and be heard. We believe that holding a National Day of Women Living with HIV Australia is a good start.” – Kath Leane, Chair of Femfatales.

Location: 57 Hyde St, Adelaide
Time: 10 am -12 pm

All are welcome to attend this morning tea with friends, family, partners & supporters.

 

Consent flowchart – education tool

Planned Parenthood Toronto, [2015?]

The consent flowchart has been designed to help young people understand how consent is negotiated.

People follow the instructional bubbles until they reach the end. They can continue each time they choose a consent option. If they choose an option where consent is not given, they land on an orange bubble and must go back to the beginning and start over. 

Yellow bubbles show different possible reposes to lack of consent.

Consent is not just about sex, as this chart shows.

Queering Sex Ed (QSE), which created this resource, is a project at Planned Parenthood Toronto, developing sex ed resources with and for LGBTQ youth. They create resources which are:

 

  • Inclusive
  • Accessible
  • Sex-positive
  • Includes trans* and cis people
  • Asexual positive
  • Doesn’t assume identity
  • Youth positive
  • Body positive
  • Empowering, not fear/shame based
  • Opens rather than closes possibilities
  • Accounts for pleasure
  • Awesome

Download the consent flowchart (PDF) here