Australian Burden of Disease Study: Illicit Drug Use, Intimate Partner Violence, Unsafe Sex

 Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Last updated: 

Burden of disease is a measure of the years of healthy life lost from living with, or dying from disease and injury. A portion of this burden is preventable, being due to modifiable risk factors. This report provides information on the deaths and burden of disease due to risk factors included in the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2015. 

New analyses of the key drivers of change over time in the burden of disease due to selected risk factors have recently been added to these data visualisations (August 2020).

The following excerpts may be of interest:

Or you can see all the data here

 

 

People with disability are more likely to be victims of crime – here’s why

The Conversation, February 22, 2019 6.06am AEDT

Some of our most vulnerable citizens have been beaten, raped, and even killed at the hands of those supposedly caring for them.

The statistics are alarming. Up to 90% of women with disability have been sexually assaulted. And people with disability are three times as likely to die prematurely than the general population from causes that could have been prevented with better quality care.

But to provide victims with justice, we need to better understand why people with disabilities are more vulnerable to abuse and assault.

Intercourse, age of initiation and contraception among adolescents in Ireland

BMC Public Health 2018 18:362 https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-5217-z

Abstract

Background

The need to tackle sexual health problems and promote positive sexual health has been acknowledged in Irish health policy. Young people’s sexual behaviour however remains under-researched with limited national data available.

Methods

This study presents the first nationally representative and internationally comparable data on young people’s sexual health behaviours in Ireland. Self-complete questionnaire data were collected from 4494 schoolchildren aged 15–18 years as part of a broader examination of health behaviour and their context. The prevalence of sexual initiation, very early sexual initiation (< 14 years) and non-condom use at last intercourse are reported and used as outcomes in separate multilevel logistic regression models examining associations between sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle characteristics and young people’s sexual behaviours.

Results

Overall, 25.7% of boys and 21.2% of girls were sexually initiated. Older age was consistently predictive of initiation for both boys and girls, as were alcohol, tobacco and cannabis involvement, living in poorer neighbourhoods and having good communication with friends. Involvement in music and drama was protective. Very early sexual initiation (< 14 years) was reported by 22.8% of sexually initiated boys and 13.4% of sexually initiated girls, and was consistently associated with rural living, cannabis involvement and bullying others for both. Boys’ very early initiation was predicted by alcohol involvement, receiving unhealthy food from parents and taking medication for psychological symptoms, whereas better communication with friends and more experience of negative health symptoms were protective. Girls’ very early initiation was predicted by being bullied and belonging to a non-Traveller community, whereas taking medication for physical symptoms and attending regular health checks was protective. Condom use was reported by 80% of sexually initiated students at last intercourse. Boys’ condom use was associated with older age, higher family affluence, bullying others, more frequent physical activity and health protective behaviours. For girls, condom use was predicted by belonging to a non-Traveller community, healthy food consumption, higher quality of life and being bullied, whereas taking medication for physical and psychological symptoms was associated with non-condom use.

Conclusions

These nationally representative research findings highlight the importance of focusing on young people as a distinct population subgroup with unique influences on their healthsexual health requiring targeted interventions and policy.

 

Australian report finds disturbing evidence of gender inequality

Guardian Australia, March 8th

Incorrect assumptions are being made that gender equality has been achieved despite disturbing and comprehensive evidence to the contrary, an investigation by Australia’s sex discrimination commissioner, Kate Jenkins, has found.

“There are many different voices in this, and my voice is tied to having spoken to rural women, LGBTI women, older women, women with disabilities, migrant women and Aboriginal women.”

  • Read more of article here 
  • Download the report (PDF) here
  • Download the infographic (jpg) here

 

Improving Cultural Understanding & Engagement with People from ATSI Communities

Improving Cultural Understanding and Engagement with people from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities: Practical learnings to improve your practice (Webinar)

1800RESPECT , October 2016

The details

When: Thursday, December 1, 2016

What Time: 01:00 PM AEDT

Duration: 45 minutes

Where: Online – wherever you like!

Presenter: Craig Ridney CEO of Kornar Winmil Yunti (KWY)

Cost: Free!

What’s your timezone?

NSW, ACT, VIC, TAS: 1.00 pm – 1.45pm

SA: 12.30 pm – 1.15 pm

QLD: 12.00 pm – 12.45 pm

NT: 11.30 pm – 12.15 pm

WA: 10.00 am – 11.45 pm

About the webinar

Family violence is a serious problem for many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities around the nation. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are 35 times more likely to be hospitalised and twice as likely to die as an outcome of family violence compared to other Australian women. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are over nine times as likely to be on care and protection orders and ten times more likely to be in out of home care than non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. There are also lower reporting rates as women are known to face specific and additional barriers to reporting in their communities. The impacts of family violence are compounded by the fact that survivors of violence may not have access to culturally appropriate services or supports, may be distrustful of the justice system, and already experience significant socioeconomic disadvantage and marginalisation.

This webinar will explore the complexities of domestic and Aboriginal family violence, provide insights into greater Aboriginal cultural competency and community engagement, and share best practice approaches to recognising and responding for frontline workers across all sectors.

You can make a difference by watching this webinar and finding out what you can do to help break the cycle of violence, and increase the safety of women and children.

Craig Ridney CEO of Kornar Winmil Yunti (KWY)

Craig is currently the CEO of Kornar Winmil Yunti (KWY) an Aboriginal not for profit organisation based in Adelaide that works closely with the specialist homelessness and domestic violence services state wide.

Craig currently holds a range of representative positions including the Minister appointed – Aboriginal Community Leadership Reference Group – providing crucial advice regarding the government response to the Nyland Child Protection Systems Royal Commission Report to cabinet, South Australian Council of Social Services (SACOSS), the Coalition of Women’s Domestic Violence Services and the Coalition for Men Supporting Non-Violence.

He recently launched The Aboriginal Family Violence Program (AFVP) focusing on women who want to stay in their relationships. The program recognises the importance of culturally appropriate safety responses for Aboriginal women and children experiencing family violence.

Register here 

Contraception: past, present and future and why it matters

WHO, 26 September 2016

Over the past 25 years, considerable progress has been made in women’s sexual and reproductive health, including increases in contraceptive use, spurred by the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD).

Despite the positive global trends there are large differences among and within countries. Over 200 million women worldwide would like to avoid a pregnancy but are not using an effective method of contraception. Reasons for this vary from each country but are related to a lack of supplies, cultural and political barriers and poor quality of services.

For policy-makers and programme managers it is critical that their decisions are informed by important lessons that we can learn from history and knowledge of what opportunities the future holds.

The video series is intended as an educational advocacy product and also for programme managers and policy makers to reinforce their commitment to prioritize modern contraception programmes and research based on a better understanding of the history and future directions of family planning and contraception.

Read more / watch video series here