Updated fact sheet on Fertility Awareness Methods (FAMs)

SHINE SA, May 2019

We have recently updated our fact sheet on Fertility Awareness Methods (FAMs). 

There has been a rise in popularity of  period tracking and fertility tracking apps, used for ‘calendar-based’ fertility awareness methods. FAMs are methods where people become aware of the signs of fertility and learn to detect when they are most likely to become pregnant.

These methods rely on the motivation, experience, commitment and cooperation of all sexual partners to be effective for contraception or conception.

The fact sheet answers question such as ‘how effective are such methods?’ and ‘what are the advantages and disadvantages?.

Efficacy of Contraceptive Methods chart – new edition 2019

Family Planning Alliance Australia, 2019

How effective is each contraceptive method? This revised chart compares methods of contraception for their efficacy. 

The figures have been derived by expert consensus using results from a variety of studies, selecting figures from studies which appear to be most comparable to Australian conditions.

Birth control: Natural methods of contraception on the rise in Australia

ABC, 22nd July 2017

Despite the messaging around safe sex and unwanted pregnancies that dominates our discussion of sexual health, a growing number of Australians are opting to risk it. A recent study out of Monash University suggests the use of so-called natural contraception methods, like withdrawal and fertility awareness, are making a comeback.

Sara Holton, a research fellow at Monash and co-author of the study, says the finding is unexpected.

Contraception for women living with violence

Children by Choice, Last modified on: 22 May 2017

Contraceptive use is often compromised for women living with violence. 

Contraceptive options that are safe and appropriate for one woman may not work for another. If you’re working with women experiencing violence, it’s important to explore each woman’s unique circumstances and draw on her own knowledge to assess the degree of comfort and safety with her contraceptive options.

Important factors to consider include whether the perpetrator is likely to:

  • Monitor the woman’s Medicare or prescription records through her MyGov account;
  • Restrict or monitor access to health care professionals;
  • Monitor menstruation and fertility patterns;
  • Engage in severe physical assaults;
  • Be actively searching for the use of contraceptive drugs or devices; and/or
  • Engage in rape and other forms of sexual assault.

This guide is not intended to replace a full medical consultation with a professional, but does provide a starting point for thinking further about which contraceptive options might be safest and most appropriate given an individual patient’s or client’s circumstances.

  • Read more here
  • Download full resource (PDF) here 

 

Withdrawal method linked to condom, pregnancy perceptions

Reuters, Thu Jan 29, 2015 4:13pm EST

Up to 17 percent of young adults in the U.S. may be using “withdrawal” to prevent pregnancy, although not necessarily relying just on that method, a new study finds.

Read more here

Unsafe sex: why everyone’s at it

The Guardian,

They pay their bills, hold down careers – so why are young people taking risks when it  comes to sex?

We talk to the women (and men) ditching contraception and trusting in luck.

Read more