Healthcare providers should discuss U=U with all their HIV-positive patients

aidsmap/nam, 18/03/2019

Healthcare providers should inform all patients with HIV they cannot transmit HIV to a sexual partner when their viral load is undetectable, argue the authors of  a strongly worded comment in The Lancet HIV.

The authors note that despite overwhelming scientific data supporting the undetectable = untransmittable (U=U) message, significant numbers of healthcare providers do not educate their patients about U=U when telling them their viral load is undetectable.

 

 

 

Gaps And Policy Barriers To Engagement With The HIV Cascade Of Care

Identifying and Plugging the Leaks: Gaps And Policy Barriers To Engagement With The HIV Cascade Of Care

CTAC (Canadian Treatment Action Council), 2018

This project explored what issues impact engagement by people living with HIV with healthcare in Ontario. The goal was to identify policy issues that impact treatment access for people living with HIV, and to identify opportunities to make the healthcare system more accessible.

The HIV Cascade of Care is a useful description of the different steps that a person living with HIV will need to take in order to achieve an undetectable viral load and optimal health outcomes, from infection and diagnosis through to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) initiation and viral suppression.

We know people drop out of the HIV Cascade of Care – e.g. why those starting treatment don’t stay on it. By seeking out policy barriers and developing solutions we can enable people to live long, healthy, and happy lives.

The project has five recommendations around barriers to engagement in the HIV Cascade of Care.

Download report here

 

FACTS NOT FEAR: a free forum on undetectable viral load

SAMESH is pleased to invite you – community members, clinicians, sector workers, anyone who may be interested – to their community forum, FACTS NOT FEAR: A forum on undetectable viral load.

 Join our panel of experts and community members to discuss the latest science about undetectable viral load and its role in preventing onward transmission of HIV, and to hear personal perspectives from People Living With HIV on how their experience of intimacy and relationships has been transformed.  There will be presentations and opportunities for questions and answers.

Panel members include:

Professor Mark Boyd

  • Chair of Medicine, Lyell McEwin Hospital, University of Adelaide
  • Principal Research Fellow, SAHMRI
  • Visiting Professorial Fellow, Kirby Institute UNSW Australia
  • President, Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine (ASHM)
  • Co-Editor-in-Chief, AIDS Research and Therapy

 Dr Carole Khaw

  • Consultant Sexual Health Physician, Clinic 275, SASSHS, Infectious Diseases Unit, Royal Adelaide Hospital
  • Clinical Senior Lecturer, School of Medicine, University of Adelaide

 Specially invited Community members

  • Speaking of their personal experiences

Free Event

6.PM – 7.30 PM, Thursday 28 September 2017,  57 Hyde ST, Adelaide

~ Light refreshments provided: a selection of cheeses, wine and juices ~

 

The Evidence for U=U: Why Negligible Risk Is Zero Risk

August 10, 2017

Over the last year, hundreds of HIV organisations have joined a new campaign to endorse the statement that HIV transmission does not occur when viral load is undetectable on ART.

And while the dramatic impact of ART on reducing HIV transmission has been known for a long time, it is new to say ART stops transmission completely.

Public health and HIV viral load suppression

UNAIDS, 19 JULY 2017

Key messages:

1. There is growing scientific consensus that people living with HIV who are taking effective antiretroviral therapy and whose virus is suppressed to undetectable levels will not transmit HIV sexually.

2. Treatment is first and foremost about enabling the person living with HIV to regain and maintain good health. Globally, there needs to be better access to viral load assays at affordable prices, combined with effective laboratory systems and robust health services. Stronger efforts should be in place to ensure that all people living with HIV have access to treatment as soon as they are diagnosed.

3. The Positive Health, Dignity and Prevention10 framework of the Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+) and UNAIDS lays out important principles for involving people living with HIV and ensuring that everyone is responsible for prevention, irrespective of their HIV status. The framework calls for ending stigma, discrimination and unjust criminalisation that violate human rights and deter people living from HIV from accessing HIV prevention, treatment and care services.

4. The UNAIDS Fast-Track approach and the 2016 United Nations Political Declaration on Ending AIDS lay out recommendations that address the primary prevention and structural changes required to reach everyone affected and to provide accessible and affordable treatment for all people living with HIV.

5. Male and female condoms and other combination prevention strategies remain a key part of the HIV response as primary prevention tools. Stronger condom programming is essential to ensure sexual and reproductive health in general, not just HIV.

 

Child Living with HIV Maintains Remission Without Drugs Since 2008

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), July 24, 2017

A nine-year-old South African child who was diagnosed with HIV infection at one month of age and received anti-HIV treatment during infancy has suppressed the virus without anti-HIV drugs for eight and a half years, scientists reported today at the 9th IAS Conference on HIV Science in Paris. This case appears to be the third reported instance of sustained HIV remission in a child after early, limited anti-HIV treatment.