New kind of male contraceptive faces biggest hurdle: drugmakers

The Age,  Published 

Doctors are on the cusp of launching the first new male contraceptive in more than a century. But rather than a Big Pharma lab, the breakthrough is emerging from a university start-up in the heart of rural India.

Years of human trials on the injectable, sperm-zapping product are coming to an end, and researchers are preparing to submit it for regulatory approval. Results so far show it’s safe, effective and easy to use – but gaining little traction with drugmakers.

Successful male contraceptive gel trial brings new form of birth control closer

Guardian, Tuesday 7 February 2017

A male contraceptive gel has been found to work reliably in a trial in primates, bringing the prospect of an alternative form of birth control for humans closer.

The product, called Vasalgel, is designed to be a reversible and less invasive form of vasectomy and in the latest study was 100% effective at preventing conception.

  • Read more of article here
  • Read full text of paper (open access) in the journal Basic and Clinical Andrology here 

Condom-free male birth control just passed another trial

Science Alert, 9 March 2016

One of the most promising male birth control techniques so far has just passed another major hurdle, with trials in rabbits showing that one injection can deliver safe and effective contraception to males for at least 12 months.

Read more here