Analysis of cervical cancer and abnormality outcomes in an era of cervical screening and HPV vaccination in Australia

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Release Date: 

This is the third report from an Australian-first project, combining screening, cancer, death, and HPV vaccination data to demonstrate the effects of screening and HPV vaccination on cervical cancer, precancerous abnormalities and cervical screening behaviour.

Screen-detected cervical cancers were less likely to cause death than those diagnosed in never-screened women, and HPV-vaccinated women were more likely to participate in cervical screening, and less likely to have a high-grade abnormality.

 

Students could learn about endometriosis as part of sex education

Guardian Australia, 

Teaching schoolchildren about pelvic pain will form part of a proposed national plan to tackle endometriosis, the debilitating condition that affects hundreds of thousands of women.

The health minister, Greg Hunt, will push the states and territories to commit to the plan, which was discussed at Friday’s Council of Australian Governments [Coag] meeting in Sydney. The draft plan is being developed in collaboration with a coalition of endometriosis advocacy and research organisations.

Can diet improve the symptoms of endometriosis?

The Conversation, February 19, 2018 6.14am AEDT

By Elisabeth Gasparini, Manager of Nutrition and Food Services, The Royal Women’s Hospital

Current treatments for endometriosis, such as surgery and contraceptive pills, can be invasive or cause unpleasant side effects. So, the internet is awash with advice for alternative treatments, including acupuncture and dietary changes. Some women claim to have reduced their symptoms by eating “anti-inflammatory” foods, cutting out gluten, dairy and alcohol.

But what is the evidence behind eating or avoiding certain foods, and should women with endometriosis adhere to a specific diet?

SHINE SA Media Release: Response to ABC report on Long Acting Reversible Contraception (LARCs)

SHINE SA, Issued: 13 December 2017

SHINE SA believes that decisions about contraception should be made in conjunction with a health care professional and that everyone should have access to accurate and unbiased information to enable appropriate informed contraceptive choice.

LARCs (Long Acting Reversible Contraception) including the levonorgestrel IUD1 (Mirena) and the subdermal implant (Implanon NXT) are the most effective reversible methods of contraception available. They have the additional advantage of being long lasting, convenient to use and generally well regarded by most users. LARC method failure rates rival that of tubal sterilization at <1% and unintended pregnancy rates are lower than those reported for contraceptive pill users.

Like all progestogen only contraceptive methods, LARCs may result in a change of bleeding pattern which may include no bleeding, frequent or prolonged bleeding. Users of the levonorgestrel IUD most commonly experience a reduction in bleeding over time and it is used as a treatment for Heavy Menstrual Bleeding for this reason. Only 1 in 5 users of the contraceptive implant have an increase in bleeding that persists beyond the first few months.

LARC use, and in particular the subdermal implant, is not known to be associated with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) which is an infection of the upper part of the female reproductive system namely the uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. PID is a known side effect of IUD insertion but occurs in less than 1 in 300 people. The risk of PID is only increased for the first 3 weeks after insertion, after which it returns to the previous background risk. Users of IUDs are encourage to return at any sign of infection and when treated promptly with antibiotics are unlikely to experience any long term complications.

New clinical guidelines to help with heavy menstrual bleeding

ABC Health & Wellbeing, 20/10/2017

25 percent of Australians who menstruate experience heavy menstrual bleeding. Now, new guidelines for doctors will help ensure these people have access to the best available treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding.

Professor Anne Duggan, senior medical advisor at the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, said some patients were not being offered the full range of treatments.

clinical guidelines

Implementation resources

These resources can be used to promote and explain what the Heavy Menstrual Bleeding Clinical Care Standard means to health services, clinicians, patients and their carers.

 

The battle over Essure

The Washington Post, Published on July 26, 2017

Nobody can say exactly how many women have had Essure implanted since the device went on the market in 2002. Bayer, which is headquartered in Germany, says that more than 750,000 devices have been sold worldwide and that sales “continue to grow.” 

In recent years, the [US] Food and Drug Administration has received more than 16,000 adverse-event reports about Essure. These are official reports about symptoms, hospitalizations or diagnoses that patients, doctors, hospitals or a device manufacturer believe are associated with a device.

“It seems every two or three years we have another controversy in women’s health,” says Steve Xu, a health-­policy researcher and Northwestern University dermatology resident.