How sexual assault survivors can feel in control during cervical screenings

ABC Life By Kellie Scott / 12th August 2020
Kate* avoids cervical screenings.The 34-year-old from Sydney is a survivor of sexual assault and finds the physical examination re-traumatising.

Kate’s experience is not unique.

One in five Australian women has experienced sexual violence since the age of 15. And research shows those who have experienced sexual abuse, either as adults or children, are less likely to attend regular cervical screening.

Developing LGBTQ programs for perpetrators and victims/survivors of domestic and family violence

Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety, 2020

Developed under the guidance of a project reference group comprised of key academics, clinicians and researchers in the areas of LGBTQ theory and practice, domestic and family violence interventions and social work practice, this research highlights the need to support the LGBTQ community in developing readiness to recognise domestic and family violence, and then seek support.

Identifying and responding to LGBTQ DFV/IPV can present specific challenges.

Key findings:
  • DFV/IPV in LGBTQ relationships can be difficult to identify and understand due to the “heterosexual face” of domestic violence.
  • DFV/IPV in LGBTQ relationships can involve unique tactics of abuse, including identity-based abuse.
  • Trauma from discrimination and stigma (minority stress) impact experiences of DFV/IPV for LGBTQ community members, but are not directly causal.
  • LGBTQ community readiness to recognise DFV/IPV and seek support, as well as service responses to LGBTQ people experiencing DFV/IPV, must be strengthened.

 

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Intersex people and COVID-19

Intersex Human Rights Australia, 12 April 2020

COVID-19 can infect any individual, irrespective of age or health but its impact exacerbates existing inequalities. All populations that suffer health inequalities are disproportionately affected, and people with intersex variations are no exception.

Current health is determined to some extent by biological factors.

Disability Support Toolkit for frontline workers – violence and abuse

1800RESPECT, March 2020

The Disability Support Toolkit has resources for front line workers supporting people with disability who have been impacted by violence and abuse.

People with disability are 1.8 times more likely to experience violence and abuse, including more varied forms of abuse. (Source: AIHW Report 2019.) They are also less likely, and take longer to reach out for support.

This Toolkit includes:

  • Research paper on best practice to implement the disability toolkit
  • Videos to share with clients on how to contact the 1800RESPECT service and how the service works
  • Easy English booklets that can be downloaded or ordered free from 1800RESPECT.

This Toolkit can be used in conjunction with information provided on our website on Inclusive Practice: Supporting people with disability.

‘Putting it into practice’ Guidelines

The ‘Putting it into Practice’ guidelines are a resource to support access and inclusion. The guidelines provide information on:

  • General principles
  • Engaging women with disabilities, including language
  • Using specialist resources

 

  • Download the guidelines in Word or PDF.

Scope Videos

This set of 3 videos were co-developed by Scope and 1800RESPECT. They are designed to be viewed by people with disability, and include information on how to contact 1800RESPECT, and how the service works.

  • Watch the videos here

Easy English booklets

The Easy English booklets have been developed as part of the Disability Pathways Project and with Women with Disabilities Australia. They are evidence based, user group tested and easy to use.

Sunny app

Sunny is 1800RESPECT’s app for women with disability who have experienced violence and abuse. Sunny has been co-designed with women with disability to make sure it provides the very best support for the people who use it. Learn more about Sunny. Sunny is free to download and is free to use on your phone.

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New resource: LGBTI R U OK? Conversation Guide

National LGBTI Health Alliance and R U OK?,  February 2020

“Life can be challenging, and we all need support during times of grief, loss, relationship breakdown and when we’re under work or financial pressure. On top of this, LGBTI people might be subject to prejudice, stigma, discrimination, harassment, and violence.” 

National LGBTI Health Alliance has collaborated with R U OK? to produce this LGBTI guide which was released just in time for the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras.

Domestic & Family Violence: Strangulation Awareness Training

Women’s Safety Services SA, October 2019

Domestic and Family Violence: Strangulation Awareness is a specialised course in understanding and responding to this key high risk factor. The latest research will be presented as well as a practice framework for responding to disclosures.

  • Tuesday 31st October 2019
  • 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm
  • Location advised on registration (Mile End area)
  • Cost: $90**

**limited half price tickets available for full time students – contact kellyb@womenssafetyservices.com.au for details of how to access these tickets

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

  • Understand the signs and symptoms of strangulation
  • Understand the physiological consequences of strangulation
  • Identify factors that indicate risk of serious harm or death in D&FV
  • Respond to disclosures of strangulation from risk and safety response model

For further information about this course, please contact the Learning and Education Coordinator: kellyb@womenssafetyservices.com.au