More LGBTQI content needed at medical schools – survey

Radio New Zealand,  23 June 2018

There are gaps in gender identity and sexuality education at medical schools, staff at the country’s two providers say. The findings were published in the most recent New Zealand Medical Journal, after surveying staff from both the Universities of Otago and Auckland.

Two-thirds said it was important and both schools would like to see more content and earlier education for medical students. When asked how much LGBTQI content was included in their module, 54 percent responded “none at all”, while 33 percent responded “a little.”

The survey’s author, University of Otago’s Charlene Rapsey, said education relating to gender identity and sexuality did happen but most material was not covered until a student’s third year – and it should at second year.

Exploring psychosocial predictors of STI testing in University students

BMC Public Health, 2018 18:664, Published: 29 May 2018

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-5587-2

Abstract:

Background

To explore university students’ Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) testing knowledge, psychosocial and demographic predictors of past STI testing behaviour, intentions to have an STI test, and high risk sexual behaviour, to inform interventions promoting STI testing in this population.

Methods

A cross-sectional, quantitative online survey was conducted in March 2016, recruiting university students from North East Scotland via an all-student email. The anonymous questionnaire assessed student demographics (e.g. sex, ethnicity, age), STI testing behaviours, sexual risk behaviours, knowledge and five psychological constructs thought to be predictive of STI testing from theory and past research: attitudes, perceived susceptibility to STIs, social norms, social fear and self-efficacy.

Results

The sample contained 1294 sexually active students (response rate 10%) aged 18–63, mean age = 23.61 (SD 6.39), 888 (69%) were female. Amongst participants, knowledge of STIs and testing was relatively high, and students held generally favourable attitudes. 52% reported ever having an STI test, 13% intended to have one in the next month; 16% reported unprotected sex with more than one ‘casual’ partner in the last six months. Being female, older, a postgraduate, longer UK residence, STI knowledge, perceived susceptibility, subjective norms, attitudes and self-efficacy all positively predicted past STI testing behaviour (p < 0.01). Perceived susceptibility to STIs and social norms positively predicted intentions to have an STI test in the next month (p  < 0.05); perceived susceptibility also predicted past high-risk sexual behaviour (p < 0.01).

Conclusions

Several psychosocial predictors of past STI testing, of high-risk sexual behaviour and future STI intentions were identified. Health promotion STI testing interventions could focus on male students and target knowledge, attitude change, and increasing perceived susceptibility to STIs, social norms and self-efficacy towards STI-testing.

Temporary open access to special journal issue on Trans Youth in Education

Sex Education, volume 18, 2018: Special Issue on Trans Youth in Education

Sex Education journal has published a special issue on Trans Youth in Education.  This is now out and is available on Open Access for a few weeks only. 

Documentary gives insight into risks of sexual assault among Australia’s international students

ABC NewsRadio Breakfast, First posted 27/04/2018 at 09:02:46
Half a million international students, most from Asia, are enrolled to study in Australia. It’s the country’s third largest export industry, worth $18 billion.

But Australia’s reputation as a safe and sunny place to study is under threat after widespread disclosures of rape and sexual assault.

Australia: Rape on Campus follows a six-month investigation into sexual assault at the country’s universities, exploring how international students, far from home and family, are especially at risk.

It follows an Australian Human Rights Commission survey which found 1.6 percent of students experienced sexual assault in a university setting in 2015 or 2016, one in five were international students.

Journalist Aela Callan is behind the documentary and she spoke to ABC’s Fiona Ellis-Jones from Berlin.

Her documentary, Australia: Rape on Campus, will be screened on Al Jazeera.

Making sexual consent matter: one-off courses are unlikely to help

The Conversation, February 15, 2018 6.05am AEDT

In the wake of the findings of the Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) 2017 national report on sexual assault and sexual harassment at Australian universities, a number of universities have introduced mandatory courses on sexual consent for new students.

Of all students who participated in the AHRC inquiry, 26% experienced some form of sexual harassment in a university setting in 2016. Just over half had experienced sexual harassment at least once in the year prior to the survey.

New resources from SIN

SIN (South Australian Adult Industry Workers Association), February 2018

The posters below were originally designed in an effort to engage migrant students with SIN’s services. However, they are not restricted to students, and may be a beneficial engagement tool in many environments.  Please feel free to distribute these to any setting where you feel they may be beneficial – with a particular focus on tertiary settings. 

SIN also has a CALD project worker, providing outreach, peer education, information, referrals, support, advocacy and safer sex supplies to migrant sex workers and sex workers from non-English speaking backgrounds. Suree is a Thai speaking peer educator available for support on all the issues that affect sex workers.

The CALD project holds social and educational events throughout the year, such as dinners, bingo nights, skill shares and workshops. Peer engagements, intensive assistance and new worker trainings are also offered by SIN’s CALD project worker.

Project Worker: Suree

Office: (08) 8351 7626 / Mobile: 0450 847 626 / Email: cald@sin.org.au

Hours: Wednesday & Thursday 1:30pm – 5:00pm, and Friday 10:00am – 5:00pm