Hepatitis C cure leads to improved quality of life

hivandhepatitis.com, 23 October 2017

 People who were cured of hepatitis C with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) had sustained improvements in their health-related quality of life, including both physical and mental health measures, according to study results presented at the 2017 AASLD Liver Meeting this week in Washington, DC.

Australian Health Organisations refute Cochrane Review Report and affirm efficacy of DAA therapy for hepatitis C

Joint position statement, Australia, June 2017

This joint Position Statement aims to strongly refute and reject the findings of the Cochrane Review report titled Direct-acting antivirals for chronic hepatitis C, published by the Cochrane Hepato‐Biliary Group on 6 June 2017.

The Position Statement was prepared by the expert panel who published a Consensus Statement for Australian recommendations for the management of hepatitis C for virus infection representing the Gastroenterological Society of Australia (Australian Liver Association), the Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases, the Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine, the Australasian Hepatology Association, Hepatitis Australia and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners.

The organisations above developed this position statement to urge health practitioners and patients not to be swayed by this flawed report claiming new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for hepatitis C do not save lives.

Quality of Life and Social Functioning during Treatment of Recent Hepatitis C Infection

Quality of Life and Social Functioning during Treatment of Recent Hepatitis C Infection: A Multi-Centre Prospective Cohort. 

PLoS ONE. 2016;11(6):e0150655. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0150655

Despite effective treatment for recent hepatitis C (HCV) infection, side-effects and adherence concerns limit its use among people who inject drugs (PWID).

This study evaluated health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and social functioning following infection and during recent HCV treatment.

Conclusions:

Social functioning can predict recent HCV treatment uptake and SVR. Efforts to maximise social stability may improve treatment response. Pegylated-interferon treatment is associated with reduced HRQoL on-treatment in an already vulnerable population of PWID that would be better served by interferon-free regimens particularly in treated target at PWID to prevent transmission

  • Access full text (open access) here 

 

How Sure Is a Cure [ after treatment for Hepatitis C ] ?

POZ, July 16, 2015

While there are no guarantees in life, once someone has been pronounced cured of hepatitis C virus (HCV), the declaration that the virus is gone for good is quite near certain. Hopefully someone who has made it to this point can feel secure in the knowledge that they have indeed started a new, healthier chapter.

However, there are two reasons why a cure might not be permanent: relapse or reinfection.

Read more here